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andykane

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175 F'n Saint

About andykane

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  • Location
    Victoria, BC
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    Sailing

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  1. On the other hand I was amazed how effectively a tarp can stop that flow. I had to replace a throughhull valve at the last minute and all the yards were booked up so I pulled a tarp over the hole and did it in the water. I could have kept up with the flow with a sponge it was so little.
  2. Since your bottom paint and boot stripe are both red I would just raise the bottom paint to the top of the thick stripe. Normally antifouling is parallel to the water (it's the boot strip that has some spring to it) so on a shippy traditional boat you'd want to actually mark out a new waterline for the bottom paint. On a boat like the Tartan above the sheer (and consequently the boot stripe) are pretty flat so you'd probably end up with some really narrow areas in the stripe and it would look better to just follow the existing stripe. That's what I did for my boat and I'm happy with how i
  3. Seems like it would be easier to tie the cable off with some scrap line, unhook the anchor, and cut the line? That's how I dropped a 150lb danforth for a mooring buoy once.
  4. There was a thread about issues getting new 2YM15s to rev last year - maybe useful? 9HP should be ample for that boat. My Ross 930 was bigger, heavier, and with a 30 year old, 8HP Yamaha outboard I never felt the need for more power.
  5. Marelon holds up great. I just replaced a 38 yr old RC Marine one because the valve seized. Next time I'll just thread on a new valve - the through hull was near indestructible and not at all brittle even after all that time.
  6. That's a good find - the broker's listing is a bit pathetic. Big difference between "build by an ex-Waterline employee" and your average self-designed/self-built boat. It does have an autopilot control in the pilothouse which seems like a good solution. If you need full steering control then you probably want to be on deck anyway. I would guess there's a deck plate above the rudder post so you can get some kind of emergency tiller on there.
  7. The specs on the designer's site suggest that light air performance would be rather sedate - SA/D of ~14, compared with 17.5 for your C&C. 40hp motor seems a bit low for 30k lbs displacement too. Here's a similar boat that looks much nicer built for not much more: https://www.yachtworld.com/yacht/2004-sk-42-pilothouse-7213632/ Weird interior layout though...
  8. Seascape 18 might fit the bill
  9. I've got a little cover you can flip out of the way. Does a good job keeping the panel dry but the plexi is getting scratched up after a couple seasons use. Next time I'd make it solid and hinge the whole thing.
  10. Where was that sketchy chain? That old, my guess would be leftovers from a logging operation. Weird about the new line shackled on though - they even wired the shackle! FWIW, mostly of the chains in BC parks are installed by the non-profit BC Marine Parks Forever society. They've been busy too - I saw a ton a nice new chains (and anchors) this summer. So don't worry, your tax dollars are being put to use on more important things like opportunistic elections and 2nd hand submarines.
  11. I've seen a router sled used as well - with a ridge on the bottom to follow the previous groove. Is there any issues with the exposed "foamed" core of the PVC?
  12. I'll third that - it's probably fine once you warm it to re-liquify. They do tend to darken with age - may be a concern if you're using the special clear hardener for it's clear color. Worth mixing up a test batch before using it on anything important.
  13. The simple explanation is that it's way easier to make from offcuts in my workshop . The boat had the fittings, but didn't come with a pilot. It might also make sense if you're racing in a situation that doesn't allow an autopilot but that didn't apply in my case.
  14. Faced with the same situation I went with a new Jabsco. 2 years in I'm happy with it - cheap, simple, it works, and I can get parts in stock at any local marine store.
  15. What's the logic behind this? Less UV exposure? I always figured sail ready to hoist = safer. I've always pulled the cover when I left the home dock, then put it back when I got back, and had the sail securely tied down but otherwise ready to hoist. This is coastal cruising, only a few weeks at a time, but has always felt like a safer option than having to remove the cover before hoisting.
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