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Panope

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Panope last won the day on December 3 2018

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575 F'n Saint

About Panope

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    Super Anarchist

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    Port Townsend, WA

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  1. When I started the anchor videos, it was just the underwater stuff and on-screen text. Right away the accusations started flying that I was working for a particular anchor manufacturer. Understandably, a lot of people could not believe that I would be doing all this "just for the hell of it". I felt that the best way to convey "who I am" was to simply show them - hence the on screen head shots. I don't mind genuine, constructive criticism. It's a good thing. But the occasional disingenuous troll types are a real pain.
  2. I would be happy as a clam just being the guy on the water or in the shop solving the nuts and bolts problems of conducting the tests, inventing the apparatuses, gathering data, and capturing the video footage. Best part is coming home dead-dog-tired reviewing footage and finding the occasional surprise. It would be fine by me if someone else took over the presentation of all this. Steve
  3. I know nothing of trimarans, but I thought this one looked cool. Anyone know what it is? Steve
  4. Around these parts, the fishermen that I have spoken to, keep their old school ground tackle (mostly Forfjord, Stockless) because they don't bend in boulders and also, because that is what fits in Hawse pipes or centerline rollers that have zero overhang. Also, I suspect that the knowledge of these people's trade, was passed down from many generations, and they are not likely to use sailing forums, Cruising World magazine, or some ridiculous anchor test, as a source of information. "We've always done it this way"
  5. Thanks for posting that, Jud. I'll take advice from Webb, any day. My second ever experience with anchoring, nearly ended in disaster. I was just a boy, on a friend's engineless schooner. Lee Shore. 25kts. Full canvas and suddenly out of control (don't ask me what the fuck we were doing there in the first place). Skipper sprang forward and let go a monster Fisherman anchor (at painfully short scope) that brought us to a halt just before wrecking into a wharf. I am sure this experience has shaped my philosophy toward my anchor tests. Specifically, I have generally approached the
  6. Although the general arrangement is similar to a Delta, by my definition of "copy anchor", this is not a "Delta Copy". Note that the Delta fluke is faceted with sharp creases, whereas the Quickset fluke is shaped with gentle curves (not unlike a CQR). Steve
  7. Pretty good anchor. Good holding in the more firm muds and sands. Low holding in softer mud. Reliable resets (does not tend to mud foul), but I did bend the shank of a Stainless Steel model during a reset in Sandy Mud (no rock). Disclaimer: All tests conducted in the PNW. Other parts of the world may have seabeds with completely different properties/results. Steve
  8. Absolutely. First, I would like very much to have the Fortress (and Danforth) on the "Holding, Resistance/Wt." graphs. At some point I probably will. Here are some of the reasons for the omission: 1) In several seabeds, the bollard power of the test boat is nowhere near enough to reach the holding power of even my smallest Fortress (I have three). As can be seen above, in this thread, my use of "arrows" on the graph is a great source of confusion. 2) For the (few) tests that I have conducted with the winch (it does pull hard enough to test the Fortress), the results are so la
  9. That was my guess. Looks like a 0.00lb./0.00kg. Model. I recommend using lots chain with these anchors. Steve
  10. I take that back. I've been in one. Florida Panhandle. Inland. Flying a small plane, Westbound into an advancing (eastbound) line of those fuckers. I figured I would "stick my nose in it" and see what all the fuss was about. Got my ass handed to me before I got near it. Landed at a dirt strip just as the rain came pouring down. Plane COVERED in mud. Remained in inside plane (parked) while the storm passed overhead. An hour later, and I was on my again under blue skies. Not sure what you I would do if trying to go in the same direction as the line. A hotel room
  11. A 5 minute, low power pause would be no problem. My standard power "ramp up" is to start just above idle and increase at 200 rpm increments, holding each for 10 seconds. I don't have any sort of "theory" behind that profile. It is just what I have always done and is easily repeat. The PNW does not experience significant T-storm activity, so thanks for that insight. I've never seen a 'real' T-storm. Steve
  12. I like it. It is on the "list of future tests". Another test that I really want to do, is a "90 Degree - Slack Rode Veer" where (all) the anchors are initially set at a value similar to a typical axillary sailboat "power set". Then, reposition the boat (with zero rode tension) 90 degrees to the anchor, and then give'er hell. This would simulate a situation where someone sets their anchor in calm conditions. Then, wind pipes up from a direction other than the direction of the set. Steve
  13. Exactly. One could argue that further testing of the "arrows" with the winch (or a stronger boat) is not even necessary. Certainly, I have more important tests to conduct first. Also, testing with the winch in that location (Clean Sand site) is significantly more difficult/dangerous than the other areas due to being exposed to: -Current -Container Ship wake. -More boat traffic that may snag the deadman anchor rode. Note: The preceding is not a complaint. I enjoy the technical challenges and effort involved with all of this madness. Steve
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