kotick

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11 Whiner

About kotick

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  • Birthday 08/07/1955

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    Catalonia
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    Sailing, scuba diving, motorcycles, model planes, hiking...

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  1. kotick

    Dick Carter design boats

    Mainsails were small back then, shortening sail was mainly done by changing jibs, so main reefing was less important than it is now. But I remember these roller systems as a devilish contraption...
  2. kotick

    Dick Carter design boats

    That is exactly what I was talking about.
  3. kotick

    Dick Carter design boats

    Yes, of course! I was referring to the halyard clutch system. I don't know if Frigate or Ydra also had this device.
  4. kotick

    Dick Carter design boats

    Correct me if I am wrong, but I remember Mabelle in the seventies - she had the first halyard clutch system I had ever seen. The halyards exited the mast inside the coachroof and traveled horizontally just under the ceiling, before exiting through the posterior wall. There were some rings with captive steel balls which held the halyards, after being winched in from the cockpit. I was a very crude system, and the halyards only could be freed after tensioning them a great deal, but it worked. In recent pictures of Mabelle I saw that this system had been removed, with the winches relocated on the mast, as it was usual in those days. I don't think the clutch system lasted for a long time, as it was difficult to use and moreover the boat interior was always damp. I don't know if this was Carter's design.
  5. kotick

    Britton Chance jr designs archives

    OK, that's what I meant. When we tried to optimize IOR ratings (that was about a century ago...) there was nothing we could do about the hull, of course, but it was clear that a greater GD meant a higher rating. Hence the narrow sterns in some boats by Holland, Chance and others. I remember a Chance 37, built in France by Wauquiez, rolling wildly under spinnaker, helmsman trying desperately to keep the boat pointing in the right direction. But it was fast! It was fun to see, especially if you were in another boat.
  6. kotick

    Britton Chance jr designs archives

    Very good explanation, thanks. I have found a very dusty copy of Peter Johnson's "Yachtsman's Guide to the Rating Rule" (1971) in which it is clearly stated that the Forward Girth Station (FGS) and Aft Girth Station (AGS) were the measurements used to determine length (L). FGS was located where "girth, measured from sheerline to sheerline round the hull, is equal to half the measured beam (B)", and AGS was the same but using 3/4 of B. As more and more designs exceeded this measure in the transom, a girth difference (GD) was used to allow for this, and AGS was located in the aft end of the deck, with the distorted consequences we all know. So, there was no bow GD. Funny how some things slip away from memory with advancing age...
  7. kotick

    Britton Chance jr designs archives

    I can't find my copy of the IOR Red Book, but I think GD was solely measured aft. And it could be negative, if it was less than the result of some formula. Anyway, the boad-sterned designs that came shortly afterwards sent this rule to the dustbin. Correctly in my view, but it was fun trying to shave a decimal from a rating.
  8. kotick

    Britton Chance jr designs archives

    IIRC, designers sought exactly the opposite - measured length should be as short as possible. Sterns had a limit on measured girth, and as almost all of them exceeded this limit there was a "girth difference" measure, or GD, in the IOR certificate. One of the benefits of long transoms was to position the top of the transom as forward as possible, to reduce measured length. At least, this is what I remember...
  9. kotick

    Older well known IOR Boats

    OMG. You are a well of knowledge. Salut, copain!
  10. kotick

    Older well known IOR Boats

    Yes, and skipped by an Admiral, no less! Agostino Straulino was the helmsman in the One Ton Cup in Porto Cervo.
  11. kotick

    Older well known IOR Boats

    Thank you for the memories you have helped to bring back! I will stop now to avoid hijacking the thread, but one more comment: I thought the original owner was a woman, I do not recall the name, but she added to the short list of European women who owned IOR boats. Monique de Tinguy du Pouet had Tadorne, a Delph 32 (Mauric plans) who sailed really well in France, Marina Scapparelli owned Ydra, a well-known Carter one-tonner (and several other boats, too) and Pam Saffery-Cooper, who owned several British half-tonners together with her husband Brian (who passed away in 2018).
  12. kotick

    Older well known IOR Boats

    A really interesting first-hand story. I have only seen Sam in pictures, so I thought the Stearn mast was original. When I said "she was not so fast as the Contention 33" I was referring to the production model. And my "big guns" are of course the metal ones, not bone and flesh! Interestingly, there seems to be several people in this thread acquainted with Samsara. I have very good memories from the Cirrus (the one we sailed had not any twist in the keel).
  13. kotick

    Older well known IOR Boats

    Thanks. Samsara is now for sale in Imperia, Italy. Ad says she was built in 1976, so I suppose both versions were developed more or less together. Sam has a thin three-spreader mast, very different from the solid stick in the production model. As I see in the pictures, the characteristic winch position is the same on both boats. She was not so fast as the Contention 33, of course, we struggled hard to keep up with them. I know nothing about the Navy-run boats, perhaps they had to carry big guns and this slowed the boats.
  14. kotick

    Older well known IOR Boats

    Cirrus 33, designed by German Frers and built in Spain, Taylor boatyard, around 1977-79. Derived from Samsara, a cold molded prototype from Souters in Cowes which finished third on the 3/4 Ton Cup in 1977 and second in her class on the infamous 1979 Fastnet. Very nice boat, very sturdy and heavy. I was an IOR measurer back then and I found that the keels were not the same size; one of them had a twist of a full degree from top to bottom, which caused some funny results on beats. https://sailboat.guide/cirrus-34-ton-frers I did a Med campaign on one of these, including the Med International Championship in Palma. We also won the Godo Cup, a well-known event in Spain. Not too fast but very reliable. Genoa winches were recessed into the cockpit, which meant that the only way to sheet hard was to press the knees against the cockpit side - very painful after several tacks. Somewhat acrobatic on runs in a heavy sea but controllable, although the tiller was rather short to compensate for the small cockpit. A nice boat.
  15. kotick

    Older well known IOR Boats

    Spaniards, as usual, denigrating others to hide their shortcomings. All of the king's boats were paid in full, plus expenses, by a Barcelona (catalan) bank. I don't know who paid fot the Navy boats but is is not difficult to guess - taxpayers. And our sailor king is now on the run in Abu Dhabi, I don't know if they race one designs there. Yes, Spain has it's own Quebec, but much more abused. I said what I had to say, I will not reply to this anymore, it would overflow to PA.