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Breamerly

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Everything posted by Breamerly

  1. Shit it's people who know what they're talking about, run! In all seriousness, yes, this makes basic sense. But I think it confirms what I'm describing? Your hand out the window is a foil. So is your hull in the water. Curve your fingers and it creates a pressure differential (force vector) on the front of the curved side, as well as a little little bit (I assume negligible amount) of lift, which you experience as pressure forcing your hand 'away from' the curve. With your hull, if you stick the more-curved surface of your hull into the water on one side the same thing happens
  2. This quickly gets to my other point, which is that I have no idea what I'm talking about, just what I've observed and "figured out", like a dangerously curious chimp. Or another way of putting it: a hull is essentially a big foil in the water, but since it has a keel, any induced lift manifests as a force rotating it about its keel (especially if, as in either the hand scenario or a close-hauled scenario, the lift is concentrated on the forward half). And you can feel this with your hand if you actually literally try it: cup your fingers downward and your hand doesn't just want to move do
  3. Right but I'm pretty sure if your hand were a hull with a keel, presenting one curved face, that force would *result in/manifest as a turning moment.
  4. The way I finally got it was sticking my hand out the car window in the highway, fingers pointing forward. Flat hand is a symmetrical hull shape. Cup your hand - an asymetrical hull profile moving through a fluid - and you're hand is immediately pushed downward (a turning moment)
  5. This image is correct in that it points out that the two vectors combine. It is incorrect in implying that they combine to form a perfectly straight-ahead vector - in reality, I'm pretty sure you still make at least some leeway in the vast majority of circumstance, as any comparison of true and apparent headings close-hauled will show.
  6. Their usual level of sucking has increased, I guess
  7. Well. I also live in Seattle and have watched two boats drag them ashore but as they say anecdotes ain't data. I hope OP reads a couple anchor tests and makes up his own mind.
  8. Do you know how to read? I'm all but incompetent and barely have a second-rate third-grade education, and even and I can see the point, politely made by multiple people on this thread, that the foils can't be "in line" if you're making any leeway at all.
  9. Yeah, this has been tested and is questionable. I don't want to thread-jack gybetalker here into (yet another, interminable) argument about anchors, but I think there's a fair bit of evidence that Danforths are not great at resetting after a big veer. Don't have the PS anchor test to hand but can certainly say that the last 3 or 4 vessels I've seen drag ashore have had a danforth at the end of their rode, and broke free on a tide change.
  10. And here I thought I'd thought this up all by myself.... Add me to the ranks that swear by this. Anytime I'm shutting down for the day I just pull the fuel hose and let the motor run dry (only exception is at anchor). At the dock I do it with the engine raised and the muffs on so I can rinse the cooling passages, too. Makes me feel very smug. Like other folks on this thread, I too was skeered of my carb for a long time - till I jerked that fucker off and got up in it. Then I discovered all the voodoo around it was just more hokum the 'necks use to keep a mystique around their stinky
  11. I don't think this is a terrible strategy, but it's worth noting its flaws. Humans routinely over-estimate their own experience and abilities, and it is a major cause of accidents. That said, sailboats are usually not terribly high-risk environments, so I don't think it's the worst idea to just say, "Hang it all, lets go, I can probably handle whatever happens." But I you can't really call that a risk reduction strategy, especially if your interest in the sport includes doing new things (IE, pushing the limits of your experience). This is exactly my interest. Over-stressing is c
  12. Listened to a sailing podcast while I was making dinner, and it focused on risk management. The host was annoying and the whole thing kind of ambled a bit, but their broader thesis seemed to ring true: risk management is broadly neglected among boaters, from racers to pleasure dinkers. And that made me wonder - what does everyone else actually *do* for risk management? Do you have checklists? Pre-articulated (written down?) standard operating procedures? Drills? For instance, I know that in theory we've all done man overboard drills. I also know that, in reality, for a lot of pe
  13. It sounds like maybe you could use some tech help? For the record, I'm not saying biweekly emails would be useful - it actually seems insanely annoying! - or that you should be taking pictures. But neither one is some feat of technological wizardry. After all, Amazon texts me a 'delivery evidence' photo of every single package I order (times a few hundred packages per customer, per driver, per day), and my (independently owned) mechanic has figured out how to use MailChimp (or something) to send me a reminder email when I'm due for an oil change.... Biweekly would be insane but actua
  14. Bless this man for he speaketh truth
  15. I am really outside my depth here - was just recommending based on what I've heard others say, which is that sludge/debris in fixed fuel tanks is awful. Based on you being chest-deep in the lazarette, I just figured it might be worth considering, especially if you figure the engine to be a piece of life-safety equipment and (as it sounds) this engine is relatively new to you. That said, yes. There are marine fuel tank cleaning services at most major ports, is my impression. There certainly are here in Seattle at the working boathaven, and google shows similar elsewhere. I assume it's some
  16. Thanks? I think? There's definitely a thing that is real that is doing a project once, start-to-finish, and realizing 2/3 of the way through that you've managed to do a just-alright job, and that what will ultimately end up happening, hopefully, is that in a couple of years you'll end up re-doing it and applying the knowledge you gained the first time to do an A++ job. I guess that's the Zen of the whole thing. As to the blower, I believe that's correct, but have no fucking idea what I'm talking about. While you're down there though you should have your tank professionally cleaned or
  17. In Arabic if I said I knew how to law a kedge and you said, "Anna kedge," that would be quite the come-on. Just sayin.
  18. Unmarked or uncharted One's eggregiously yr fault the other less so
  19. One thing I learned in a big way on a couple recent projects: with hose/tubing there's a very real trade-off between durability and ease of installation. I redid my scuppers and used the heaviest-duty wet exhaust rated super-duper-duty metal jacketed marine shit I could find... And stabbed myself in the fucking hand trying to trim it in place, on top of spending a whole afternoon on my back, covered in lube and spit trying to get it onto the fittings. If both ends are well above the waterline I personally would use the softest, easiest to work with stuff you can find. At most, someth
  20. In the pnw it doesn't really freeze hard at sea level, but I can say that I under-insulated the PEX under my tiny house (long story) and it froze a few times over the course of a couple of years without damage/leaks. This squares with what I've heard about it having enough flexibility to expand rather than cracking.
  21. Jesus In all seriousness though, that's why I'm skeptical of the private sector, or any third parties at all in the chain in rescue systems. "Help! I fell overboard and am drowning!" "I'm sorry, your RescueSYS20 requires a software update" "There are sharks! Drowning!" "Your payment method on file has expired, please update by entering a new card number." "They're CIRCLING ME IN THE WATER HERE!" "Thank you for calling Garmin, recently acquired by Amazon. DUE to the Covid-19 health crisis, you may experience longer wait times than normal. For an
  22. Uhhhh that all sounds real compicat e d. I use an old jib sheet tied to a bridle. Or, I do that when I don't have it in the foredeck, which I do for any passage over 5 hours. Quite a few useful pointers here and elsewhere in this thread.
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