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Breamerly

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Everything posted by Breamerly

  1. This times 100. Go back to the basics: The rudder is a tool for converting forward force into lateral force, which manifests as force attempting to rotate the vessel about it's center of resistance. The reason you're having to input a bunch of rotational force into the system in *one direction* (to leeward) is because something *else* is inputting rotational force in *the opposite direction*. Could be sail balance (my bet) or the waterline itself if it mainly worsens when heeling, or something else. I'm not a good enough sailor to say much more than that, but I bet you
  2. look let's just keep this civil and focus on the real topic at hand: the importance of laying a kedge
  3. I mean, I can't help that you decided to make your home in the forgotten wasteland that is the entire rest of the country besides the Puget Sound region. Good day.
  4. Okay so I see you have the "removal" part covered, now what about "prepping for sale"? Also I'm guessing there's not quite the market for used luxury junk as there is for used good/decent junk. Luxury buyers buy new junk, methinks.
  5. ??? https://www.seamar.com/products/589/Bruce-Style-Anchors/
  6. Looks great. I have to say I always admire people who worked their way into sailing by force of their own interest in it. I grew up doing it, and I'm not sure I ever would have started otherwise - the learning curve (and the spending curve) is so steep! So, extra kudos to you - even though it might lack standing headroom, the only limit to how far you can go in that thing is how far you can convince your wife* to go in that thing! (I'm loath to be the one who starts in with the suggestions but if you are going to do much anchoring you might really consider getting a more modern bow anchor
  7. I mean, sure. You've got some history you're tracing out here and I'm not addressing the accuracy of it one way or the other - Maybe it does go back to Dolomite. Maybe all true rappers actually can be traced back to Howlin Wolf, or Charlie Chaplin for that matter. What I'm lmao'ing at is the fact that in the midst of an otherwise mellow thread you pop up proposing some kind of criteria for what 'real rap' is, and trying to claim rap music as intrinsically American. It reminds me of a joke - how many hipsters does it take to screw in a light bulb? "It's a really obscure number, you probabl
  8. lmaaaaaaaoo "all rap goes back to tupac, rap is therefore a permanently, intrinsically american domain, and ne1 trying 2 imitate is just like copying monet, I have a galaxy brain" --> take of the century @Marinatrix447 and @Shortforbob definitely will be listening while I work to a few of these weird foreigners you've posted
  9. Ooh I'd heard as was a no-no though. I had wondered about it -cockpit scupper sees a lot of water movement, dries out sometimes, so theoretically gets oxygen, won't crevice corrode - but I've heard people say it's bad to use at/below the waterline
  10. Hey I didn't realize you were in Seattle. Get thee down to Ballard Industrial - they've got almost everything McMaster does as far as pipe fittings, and if they don't they can get it in at most two days w/no shipping charge. And they don't mind spending a few minutes figuring out exactly which part is best, either. Plus they are cheaper than either fishermans or even seamar (seamar guy told me they actually buy all their fittings stock from Ballard Industrial lol). They were the ones who set me up with the tees/valves/barbs for my potable water. They had it all in schedule 80, odd
  11. Eh, I'm probably just bring a cheapskate baby and should just pony up for the bronze and fabricate some sort of adjacent support member while I'm at it
  12. Haha my main tank is 20 gallons and I was extremely stoked that with a pair of cans I could about double that. Gets us seven days between fillups if we're careful, but as importantly it lets us top up just by bringing a can or two ashore from anchor at a state park, rather than having to dick around with Mordor I mean "Marinas". You boys are playing in a different ballpark from me over here.
  13. Errr, *jerricans. I don't fill my tank with anything from Jerry lol.
  14. That's nice and clean. Rather than tanks, I just installed a filler tube so I can refill my main tank from Jerry came. So my manifold is a little weirder - it lets you select both source and output. I didn't really have space to have it 'on display' anywhere, so I just buried it in a void in the galley cabinet, though, so it's neither as accessible or as pretty as yours.
  15. Sorry to get defensive by the way.
  16. A bullhead tee would be the ideal, is all I was saying. And plenty of people make them, just not in bronze. And yes, you could obviously do it by Daisy-chaining half a dozen fittings together. Heck, with reducing nipples you don't even have to do that much Daisy-chaining, if you can find them in marine bronze (McMaster has them in some kind of bronze but???) My point was just that doing it that way seems like it has its own drawbacks: it's unweildy/bulky, it's expensive, and it would be heavy enough that to do it right send like it would require some kind of strapping or other external s
  17. I didn't explain my specific situation at first but it seems relevant now... In a nutshell, I have to join a pair of 1.5" scupper drain hoses above a 2" thru-hull. That dictates either a "bull head tee" and regular king nipples or a regular 2" tee with either reducing nipples or reducing bushings + straight nipples on two legs. The bull head tee would be the very best - one fitting to rule them all. Actually, a bull head barbed WYE would be the ideal thing. But I even bullhead tees (the opposite of a reducing tee) are a relatively uncommon fitting, even in black pipe. Finding a bullh
  18. This is my gut feeling about PVC in general. It's been nothing but delicate where I've worked with it (only with sch40 though), and seems to shatter at the slightest provocation. I am surprised to hear this about schedule 80 though - seems well-regarded even by the working boat guys, and is tangibly heavier-duty than sch 40 - but I will definitely take it on board along with what Nodrog was saying about molding stresses. Like I said in the OP, Marelon is popular but doesn't make the fittings I need. Unless I missed something on their website, they basically only sell seacocks, b
  19. Interesting about the glass reenforced ones. Brand or source? Also do you have a source for more info on the sch 80 moulding stresses? Not too worried based on what you said about temps, since this pnw 27 footer isn't going to be doing any Labrador cruising anytime soon.
  20. Dollars to donuts there's trace lead or heavy metal in the manufacturing process somewhere, so they have to label it even though for a long time it was considered safe.
  21. Personally, I used a pair of ball valves and a tee because they're easily available in schedule 80 PVC and cost 1/10 as much and I had to do 2 of them. But it you want that sleek look... https://www.homedepot.com/p/Apollo-1-2-in-x-1-2-in-x-1-2-in-Bronze-FNPT-x-FNPT-3-Way-Diverter-Valve-7060301/312899989?mtc=Shopping-VF-F_D26P-G-D26P-26_1_PIPE_AND_FITTINGS-MULTI-NA-Feed-PLA-NA-NA-PIPE_AND_FITTINGS_General&cm_mmc=Shopping-VF-F_D26P-G-D26P-26_1_PIPE_AND_FITTINGS-MULTI-NA-Feed-PLA-NA-NA-PIPE_AND_FITTINGS_General-71700000055362041-58700005218218023-92700046076001437&gclsrc=aw.d
  22. Also, if you tend toward thinking this stuff is solved, I'd be interested if you see any parallel with the treatment of first nations folks in Canada? My understanding is that there are similar situations of historical racism/colonialism being perpetuated in modern systems there.
  23. Came upon this little divergence from ABYC dogma during my thru-hull replacement adventure recently. So, we all know ABYC recommends only corrosion-resistant materials below the waterline, and most take this to mean bronze (stainless being subject to crevice corrosion) or Marelon. But while projecting I got the impression that commercial fish boats sometimes use Schedule 80 PVC (grey, thicker-walled than white) fittings below the waterline, after the nipple. in other words, in applications where they are not mated to a fixture such as a seacock, but instead are connected to/buried in
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