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Sidecar

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1,059 F'n Saint

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  1. It’s not just the Netherlands: https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2013/09/why-scandinavian-prisons-are-superior/279949/
  2. Especially in water less than full rudder depth…… Shunting at a lesser depth could also be interesting as well. Up and over rudders somehow coordinated to avoid boom/sail/sheet swing?
  3. If you were a positive, constructive, helpful designer instead of a point scoring pissant desperate for self publicity, you would know that the most likely worst case beam design and shock load would be ploughing, crashing and bashing along into, through and flying off substantial waves and chop with maxed out sail area at high speed (pick any speed you reckon), rather than in hurricane conditions, when you would be laying a hull, ama naturally to windward, sails down, drifting slowly sideways with the waves. Specific, proven knowledge of the likely forces is hard to come by and a safety
  4. It’s the porn version of the old saying: Men spend their first 9 months trying to get out of a vagina, and the rest of their lives trying to get back in…….
  5. Why even bother with EP and batteries?
  6. You’re welcome………found two more: http://www.cherini.eu/etnografia/Oceania1/index.html http://www.cherini.eu/etnografia/Oceania2/index.html And then there is his other work (all fascinating) to wade through: https://www.cherini.eu/
  7. If you haven’t seen them, Aldo Cherini’s drawings of Polynesian craft are wonderful, for his drawing ability, and for the sheer variety and ingenuity of the “make do” solutions. There used to be three collections, but I can’t find a link to them anymore. The best that I could do: https://www.cherini.eu/etnografia/Oceania/index.html
  8. Being caught aback is like getting a massive header which you can’t respond to and can’t ease the jib, and you get put about. if A Proa can’t tack so if you are pinned whilst shunting, it is possible to be blown over if there is insufficient RM in the reverse situation. Many traditional proas have insufficient rig support to leeward and not a lot of reverse RM, hence the historic concern. Most modern pacific proa rigs, including Sidecar, are well supported and rig collapse and inadequate reverse RM are non issues…… unless you are an Atlantic with too much sail up. I have been caught aback
  9. Overachiever ….. And so exhausting too.
  10. I am pretty sure there isn’t. It was all trial and error. If a stick or branch (beam) broke or flexed too much, they just got a bigger one…. Good luck in the rabbit hole. There are so many variations of akas to start with…..
  11. Yes. The PP could have longer akas for more righting moment and the same weight, but I compared like for like, to avoid confusion or argument. If you fly the ama with say X ft2 of sail, then caught aback even at full efficiency, X ft2 of sail will produce the same heeling moment to be resisted. You are correct that most modern PP’s have significantly more reserve buoyancy and therefore much more RM “aback” than “needed”in the context of minimising the ama etc in order to maximise the leeward hull. Most traditional PP’s have significantly less ama reserve buoyancy than modern examples
  12. ^^^^^This. The name of the game is to maximise the LWL of the working leeward hull and the way to do it is to minimise as much as possible the windward ama. There are other benefits in doing this, such as less WSA, drag, windage and less catamaran style cork screwing motion in waves. With regard to the lighter beams argument. Consider an Atlantic and pacific Proa of same Displ and Bc/c. Pacific max RM will be say ~ 0.25*Displ* Bc/c. Caught aback, it will be ~ 0.25*Displ*Bc/c due to the sail carrying limitation. Atlantic max Rm will be say ~ 0.70*Displ*Bc/c. Caught aback it will be ~
  13. You are confusing absolute totals with totals per million….. In absolute terms: Alabama: 554,071 and 11,398 respectively. https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/us/
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