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trisail

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About trisail

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  1. I learnt from a friend in the South African boating industry that a leading person from within the industry went and spoke to the sailmaker about the non-performance and that the sails were being despatched within the next day or so. Lets hope all ends well.
  2. Good evening, Hell, a lot of posts here, mostly from people who have probably never even been to Patagonia. Go to www.bosunbird.com An elderly couple who spent a winter in the Channels down there sailing a Vancouver 27. All very civilised and comfortable. And get the bible for Patagonia, "Patagonia & Tierra del Fuego. Nautical Guide" by Mariolina Rolfo and Giorgio Ardrizzi. Make sure you have a strong reliable engine. You need it to get into the very tight anchorages when it is breezy out in the Channels. And your four sets of warps, ready on deck to strap the boat in
  3. In my part of the world we call it a Granny Tack.
  4. Skimmer was built by a yard in Cape Town. But the Nexus team is a class act.
  5. Number 12 of the 526's it seems. Hence the 12's on the staff t shirts. Looking through the factory doors, it looks like there are another 3 or 4 in progress. They have also built a number of 60's.
  6. The latest Balance 526 being hauled down to the harbour today. Built by Nexus Catamarans in St Francis Bay, South Africa. It's always an exciting day here in town when a new build leaves the factory. Pics taken from their Facebook page.
  7. Power boats okay here? Currently building little 4 meter retro design outboard runabout for my wife. If it was a sail boat it would have been done ages ago!
  8. The Bosun Dinghy. Brings back memories from my days as a National Serviceman in the South African Navy. Heavy, baggy sails and telegraph poles for masts. Firstly, it was an escape capsule to get out of earshot of anyone in higher rank than yourself. Take a boat on a Wednesday afternoon "Sports parade" and sail out into the bay with a mate who has never sailed before. Only to be chased down by a patrol boat because you are heading too far out offshore or perhaps venturing into a shooting range with a gunnery practice having to be halted......Biiig Trouble. Or, on a Saturday,
  9. Imagine being on Skorpios and asking, "Tea anyone?" And on Apivia, 'hey bud, would you like some tea?"
  10. Its nice to see Stormvogel, the 1961 Line Honours winner giving it a good go. Currently lying 43rd in the monohull fleet, she is celebrating her win of 60 years ago. At 74 ft she was one of the first line honours specialists to be launched back in 1961. Designed by a partnership between van de Stadt, Laurent Giles and Illingworth, built in moulded timber, a lightweight flyer way ahead of its time, for Dutch plywood tycoon, Kees Bruynzeel. I wonder if any of the current fleet chasing a first to finish will still be sailing in 60 years from today.
  11. Have a look at how this guy makes wooden Optimist kits. www.ckdboats.blogspot.com Regards.
  12. Good evening, What can I say? You are one lucky fish. That is a beautiful boat. Old Ian really knew his stuff. Have lots of fun.
  13. Yep, I'd say they are. The Parlay videos showed bulkheads that are simply held in place with nothing but bog. No tabbing. Elsewhere the videos show tabbing that is so badly done, it runs along the bulkhead, but makes no contact with the hull-sides or visa versa. It shows dry laminates as well. It shows end grain plywood which has not been sealed to protect the wood against water ingress, so any kind of flooding will cause rot to start in bulkheads. All this is indicative of a factory building to very low standards. Then there are examples of over large cut-outs in bu
  14. Good evening, It's a fantastic smooth and easy ride. The boat loves the open ocean. But, it must be kept light and spartan. Think hiking and camping in a two man tent versus an RV. We really enjoyed our passage and lived comfortable on dry and level bunks, preparing nice simple meals in a level galley without dishes flying all over the place as it would have been on a same size (or any size!) monohull. I have done two trans-Atlantic crossings with 10 meter size light IOR racing monohulls along the edges of the Roaring Forties, one of which was a solo passage and have ridden out
  15. Wow! Now that's a cool boat. Well done. Please post some more details and specs. Regards.
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