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mezaire

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About mezaire

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    Super Anarchist
  • Birthday 07/26/1977

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    www.almasts.com
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    Tasmania

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  1. Actually pedal to prop propulsion has been done a fair bit in races like the British and Tasmanian 3 Peaks race! As they usually had 3 sailors and 2 runners, most boats stuck what was basically 2 x tandem bikes (up to 4 cyclists at a time) on the stern. The drive was a long shaft on a uni joint so it could be raised/lowered. Also ran through a gear system, Some boats did experiment with a straight through drive and pedals running along the cockpit floor with ply sitting between the seats for normal sailing. Most of these were 35ft+ older race yachts and most could pedal at u
  2. Were ETNZ sandbagging a little to make it a close series? or is the extra 2-3knots of breeze mean they can simply engage "turbo" mode?!
  3. This just popped up on Youtube for me!! Looks pretty stable and quick!!
  4. Boris's speed down to 14knots. Looks like he is prepping to gybe again
  5. So lay your bets one who finishes when/where!! For mine, over the line 1. Charlie 2. Louis 3. Boris 4. Thomas 5. Yannick 6. Giancarlo 7. Damien 8. LeCam After time compensation 1. Yannick 2. Boris 3. LeCam 4. Charlie 5. Louis 6. Thomas 7. Giancarlo 8. Damien So boats with time compensation to finish 1,2,3!! Tough on Charlie and Louis!
  6. At the same time he went from 140 TWA to 155-160 TWA, his runner loads dropped and he had a increase of wind speed, so maybe running deep for a sail change that took longer than expected? At least his VMG wouldn't of taken a massive hit
  7. On the battery theory, doesn't add up to me.... Firstly if it was a battery being thrown fwd, then you think the hole would be right in the bow as where the hole is would of only been a glancing blow. Secondly, the boat didn't actually go from 45 knots to zero that quickly at all. If you watch the footage they still have the speed of AM showing and she is still doing 11 knots when the hull touches back down. Just my thoughts
  8. Just my thoughts, but if the support joined the hull just aft of the hole, it might of caused the hull to flex out and the weak point that gave way was at the front of the hole. Then as they touched down the water pressure at 30 odd knots then tore the piece out of the hull. Similar to when a boat looses it's keel from a hard grounding, often the structural failure is more than a metre fore/aft of the keel.
  9. If you watch the footage of the crash you can see the bit of carbon hull come clear of the stern just after touchdown and then see it floating 50m away or so. Assuming this is the same piece being unloaded in the earlier pic. I'm assuming it is where a fwd support arm for the foil is attached to the hull, or even just fwd of that position.. The huge force aft on the foil, forced the support arm through the hull and then the water pressure tore it away!!
  10. The assumption is (I think) that it is the fwd support for the foil that ripped the hull apart!
  11. Bloody hell!! You'd imagine that must be close to writing the hull off and going back to the old one?
  12. I assume that is stuff.co.nz?
  13. LSD reporting they have a pic of the hole half way between the bow and foil
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