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Vincent DePillis

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About Vincent DePillis

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  1. I visited the project yesterday. What struck me is how beautiful the hull shape is. Very graceful and balanced. No chines, reasonable width. And the structure and construction is simple-- all glass and foam. Will be easy to work on. It is a very different beast from today's open 60s that's for sure. Matt has a clear and pragmatic vision for the remodeling, and has the skills to get it done. Will be fun to follow his progress. Amazing how much cool boat stuff happens in Port Townsend-- for such a small place.
  2. Gonna be 65 next month. Sail anF31r in the Salish Sea. Been thinking a lot about to NOT lose the love for for sailing. How to adapt my boat and ambitions to my lesser strength and increased caution. It's gonna take a while in part because of the ingrained go-fast habits. For instance, this summer I did a bit of a deep dive on installing a roller furling jib. Ended up not pulling the trigger because I could not quite handle paying all that money and getting a much heavier set up with a whole lot less sail area. So not I am working on optimizing a jib downhaul set up.
  3. Getting ready to install constrictor clutches in my new boom. They will lock the reef lines. When I go to mock up the installation for the first time, I find that I cannot get the 3/8 inch line through the sleeve at the point where the sleeve enters the clutch cone. I check the sizing again-- I have the 10mm clutch, supposed to be good for 5/16 - 3/8ths inch line. Looking into the clutch from an aft viewpoint, the sleeve looks vey narrow as it exits the clutch cone-- like 5 or 6mm. The reef lines are well used, somewhat fuzzy, but they still measure 3/8ths. The whipping is a hard spo
  4. Dimension Polyant has a somewhat new fabric called "Ilex" for use in triradial sails. This is supposed to be a "filmless" fabric, and extremely light. Have not seen it in the flesh, but curious if it would be a reason to look at a triradial sail. DP does not seem to be spending much effort promoting it tho- wonder if it is real world available.
  5. This would be for a system without furling, I presume.
  6. Lashed head set up should reduce cost, windage, and weight relative to other furling set-ups. I found an older rail meat post about the use of a lashed j1 on his class 40 (Dragon), and he said that getting good luff tension with a luff tackle was not that easy. I am just thinking through what it will entail to get some additional luff tension as the wind rises-- i.e. go to the bow, try to hand tension a 4:1 tackle, and some how cleat it off and then stow the tail of the tackle. Couple of cranks on a winch is a LOT quicker and easier... As for the life of the structural cable-- that 2
  7. Question for the Class 40 knowledgeable: I have been told that some (many?) class 40s use a structural jib furler and simply lash the head of the jib to the top swivel. You need to take the sail down, you go up the mast. I have discussed doing this on my own boat (an f31 tri) with a number of knowledgeable sailors here in the PNW, and the reaction has been.... cautious. I suspect that they are being polite, while thinking that I have a screw loose. They always bring up the issue of "what happens if the furler fails, and you can't get the sail down". This worry seems to be
  8. Hi Alex-- yeah the loss of area is going to be brutal, but its time to get real about the safety issues associated racing with a group who are all over 60. I have some thoughts about a masthead cableless light air sail that would give us more power in light air, especially up wind. Means more mast and sprit mods, but hey, what is retirement for.
  9. looking to get a furling jib. Boat is a corsair f-31 trimaran. Looking for a high performance laminate. Sail will live on the furler. small furl is important to me to keep windage low when at anchor and when sailing with my heavy weather jib (sets on an inner forestay). Wondering if the new "filmless" laminates are thinner and hence give a tighter furl. or perhaps3di raw?
  10. Anybody using Lightspeed Carbon Rigging? They say that because of a more flexible resin matrix, it is tougher, and can even be used with steel hanks on a forestay. Sounds intriguing. V
  11. Can't believe that I first started this topic in August of last year. For the benefit of all you hole drillers out there, I ended up going with a solid carbide dagger bit from Panamerican Tool. Very spendy at $170, but worked well. Minimal/no tear out on either side of the hole, and gave me a sufficiently round hole without using a reamer. Dagger bit.pdf
  12. I use a lot of 80 grit 2 inch wide PSA strips. Buy a box at a time, 2.75" by 16.5". I used to get a 3m product that was purple. Seemed really good and sharp. Now fisheries tells me that the purple has been discontinued, and that the green is all they carry. The green stuff is very mediocre. Any advice on quality sandpaper?
  13. Thank you all for your responses.
  14. Hi Steve-- thanks for the specific comments regarding the Smithy. I really really only have room for one relatively small machine. Looking at the website, it seems like they have an upgraded range (the "Granite Series"). Do you remember which model you had? I am not sure about what I will make with the machine. Examples might be a new mast head crane, or mast step for a rotating mast, or a slide for my outboard. I can imagine using a fair amount of g10, delrin, aluminum. I would like to be able to do stainless or titanium, but that might be a stretch especially with a hobby scale mac
  15. I was rereading Herreshoff's "The Complete Cruiser" was struck again by Goddard's paean to his lathe, beginning "for I am quite sure that lathe has given me more enjoyment than anything I have ever had including my boats and canoes ..." Like Coridon, I have always wanted to do some metal working-- and now in my retirement, wondering if I could get some use and pleasure out of a small lathe or mill. I was thinkin a grizzly bench mill, or a Smithy, or some ancient small lathe. I kind of shy away from the idea of investing a bunch of time learning a cad cam program. Spent most of my li
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