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The Mad Hatter

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Everything posted by The Mad Hatter

  1. HW, What temp do you heat the oven? I have make the bag just from flat plastic and packing tape. You have to also make up ends for the mould so the bag only provides a seal and the mould has all the structural strength. I have also used lay flat plastic tubing and just sealed the ends. As long as the bag you use when fully inflated would be larger than the inside dia of the tube you are making and the mould takes the load when you pump it up, it all works fine. I just connect up the compressor set up to continue to provide 35psi which I found to be optimum . I have made tubes using
  2. By far the best exterior finish I've got is when I make the tube with the split alloy tube lined with packing tape for release and inflating a bag. They come out like a length of shiny black glass. When I do it on an alloy mandrel once it has been spun I wrap it in 2inch wide strips of peel ply and then duct tape all while spinning the tube. The laminate is so tight and compact there is no way I could release by pouring ice water down. (I tried that over 20yrs ago when I made my first carbon tube.) The carbon can still be post cured once it has been released. The thinner tubes I've mad
  3. If you want to start the project with a carbon tube, I have made carbon tubes 3 different ways. The one I made to act as a socket for my pole to slide into was made over a male mandrel of plastic poly pipe. I set it up so I could spin it on an axle with a cordless drill. The mandrel was made to collapse to release once the carbon cured . It was surprisingly easy to do. Being able to spin the tube allows one to compress the laminate a surprising amount. If you have an alloy mandrel you can just coat it in candle wax and pour boiling water down once cured and the alloy
  4. Boats built from wood in rising temps without a vacuum are eventually prone to problems. If prep work is done while temp is going up and laminating when temp is going down or if a vacuum is applied it will easily outlast the builder. Not such an issue with foam cored boats because the closed cells of the foam limit the moisture migration.
  5. One can have a problem with exotherm and bubbles in a very thick application of resin that cures too quickly, but if the days temp is not falling at the time any rise in ambient temp causes air in the core to expand and this can blow bubbles in even very thin resin applications. The ambient temp is usually not a problem as long as it has started to fall and continues to fall. From my own experiments I have found that once the ambient temp starts to fall there is a bit of a lag before the air in the core stops expending. The real down side of the bubbles is that they can also provide a path
  6. That face is a really cool touch !
  7. Jules, Just in case you are not already aware for future reference as well as peel ply, which I always use, laying the glass on the bias allows it to take sharp curves much better. Some nylon fabrics work well for peel ply and can be obtained quite cheaply. Although you may need to test them before using. I've used both peel ply and nylon fabric in its place and they are both very good. I hope you are happy with what you have done because from here it looks really great.
  8. Anyone know what happened to Wahoo?
  9. If it was going to be for years maybe paint it but under 1 yr I wouldn't bother. The epoxy may yellow a little but you are going to coat it anyway.
  10. I think the major problem with wood boats is not the wood but the builder. A couple of simple rules have always worked for me. The wood has to be dry and when the resin is applied the wood needs to be cooling and not warming up unless applying a vacuum. All fixing holes need to be oversized and filled and then re drilled with a smaller drill to keep a healthy layer of thickened epoxy between the moisture and the wood. I also like putting a light layer of glass over it to stop the grain from opening up and letting moisture in on areas exposed to the elements. It is a very easy material
  11. If it was me I'd do something similar to what Duncan said but I'd use a hand saw with a decent set on it. Then clamp it just to make sure I can close it up around 1mm narrower than original. Open the gap up and inject microfibre / resin mix to glue back together. Clamp to the original width minus 1mm. When the glue has cured I would wrap a couple layers of glass on the bias around the leading edge and back as far as I can and still fair that back to original width.
  12. I was surprised to learn myself when I built that the hulls are by far the cheapest part of the boat. Just a fraction of the cost of the rig and sails. All the best , I hope you can raise the money to do it right.
  13. It seems to me that dynex would be the perfect material for this application. Although I don't think it would be legal?
  14. Have you thought of gluing something above the bunks like carpet or mouse fur that water is less inclined to condense on? You will still get condensation on any other surfaces that currently get it, but avoid getting rained on while sleeping.
  15. How about stopping them from banging inside the mast. Sitting on the mooring and a power boat goes by and they bang away. Boat is moored close to houses that would rather they didn't do that. I have an idea but would be interested in hearing what others would do in the hope of something better.
  16. That is an excellent point. People are looking at anything that will give them some idea of future quality. If the new company cant replicate a working web site, without a lot of it getting lost ,what is the chance of them being able to build a boat as detailed and complex as a folding trimaran. It is very much in their own interest to demonstrate beyond doubt that they can excel in the small stuff if they want to instill faith that they will be able to handle the big stuff. Loulou, I hope you are able to reestablish everything from the old site.
  17. Ain't that the truth. I don't mind taking a long time to do something right. What I can't handle is to have to do something a second time.
  18. That is an excellent point. People are looking at anything that will give them some idea of future quality. If the new company cant replicate a working web site, without a lot of it getting lost ,what is the chance of them being able to build a boat as detailed and complex as a folding trimaran. It is very much in their own interest to demonstrate beyond doubt that they can excel in the small stuff if they want to instill faith that they will be able to handle the big stuff. I would like to see them carry on Ian's legacy but he isn't an easy act to follow.
  19. Plywood will last if you know how to treat it properly. I have a friend with a boat that has been on a mooring for a bit over 16years with ply floor boards they still look like new.
  20. When building my tri I extended the foam 40mm past the frames and applied two coast of resin that was amine blush free and managed a good seal that way. Initially I put a layer of microlight and resin , once cured, I sanded and then a coat of resin over that but found out as the project progressed the filler was not needed as two coats of resin were sufficient to fill the exposed cells of the corecell. foam. I would wait until the first coat went tacky before applying the second coat. With an amine blush free resin I could apply the tacky tape straight over the cured resin. I also had a coupl
  21. Now that is the $64,000 question! The next would be what is happening about spare parts like bushings and other components plan builders rely on purchasing from Farrier Marine?
  22. Sometimes you can get a minor mount of spring back. A minor amount would help when you glue them in as you could just prop the centre of the beam in order to clamp it in while the glue cures. Having said that the tighter the radius the more spring back you are likely to get. I suspect your radius will be such that the spring back will be hardly noticeable but could be enough to help with the final gluing in place.
  23. Two things in this thread have me scratching my head.. Why is the brummel lock under load. It sounds like the bury is just not deep enough. I am also stumped by the need to pull the halyard out of the mast. A Raz'r stated you only need one end of the line to do the splice and after some practice it can be done quite quickly. You can't do the splice through a hole in a fitting but if it is just a shackle would you just remove the pin?
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