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The Mad Hatter

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Everything posted by The Mad Hatter

  1. Jules, Just in case you are not already aware for future reference as well as peel ply, which I always use, laying the glass on the bias allows it to take sharp curves much better. Some nylon fabrics work well for peel ply and can be obtained quite cheaply. Although you may need to test them before using. I've used both peel ply and nylon fabric in its place and they are both very good. I hope you are happy with what you have done because from here it looks really great.
  2. Anyone know what happened to Wahoo?
  3. If it was going to be for years maybe paint it but under 1 yr I wouldn't bother. The epoxy may yellow a little but you are going to coat it anyway.
  4. I think the major problem with wood boats is not the wood but the builder. A couple of simple rules have always worked for me. The wood has to be dry and when the resin is applied the wood needs to be cooling and not warming up unless applying a vacuum. All fixing holes need to be oversized and filled and then re drilled with a smaller drill to keep a healthy layer of thickened epoxy between the moisture and the wood. I also like putting a light layer of glass over it to stop the grain from opening up and letting moisture in on areas exposed to the elements. It is a very easy material
  5. If it was me I'd do something similar to what Duncan said but I'd use a hand saw with a decent set on it. Then clamp it just to make sure I can close it up around 1mm narrower than original. Open the gap up and inject microfibre / resin mix to glue back together. Clamp to the original width minus 1mm. When the glue has cured I would wrap a couple layers of glass on the bias around the leading edge and back as far as I can and still fair that back to original width.
  6. I was surprised to learn myself when I built that the hulls are by far the cheapest part of the boat. Just a fraction of the cost of the rig and sails. All the best , I hope you can raise the money to do it right.
  7. It seems to me that dynex would be the perfect material for this application. Although I don't think it would be legal?
  8. Have you thought of gluing something above the bunks like carpet or mouse fur that water is less inclined to condense on? You will still get condensation on any other surfaces that currently get it, but avoid getting rained on while sleeping.
  9. How about stopping them from banging inside the mast. Sitting on the mooring and a power boat goes by and they bang away. Boat is moored close to houses that would rather they didn't do that. I have an idea but would be interested in hearing what others would do in the hope of something better.
  10. That is an excellent point. People are looking at anything that will give them some idea of future quality. If the new company cant replicate a working web site, without a lot of it getting lost ,what is the chance of them being able to build a boat as detailed and complex as a folding trimaran. It is very much in their own interest to demonstrate beyond doubt that they can excel in the small stuff if they want to instill faith that they will be able to handle the big stuff. Loulou, I hope you are able to reestablish everything from the old site.
  11. Ain't that the truth. I don't mind taking a long time to do something right. What I can't handle is to have to do something a second time.
  12. That is an excellent point. People are looking at anything that will give them some idea of future quality. If the new company cant replicate a working web site, without a lot of it getting lost ,what is the chance of them being able to build a boat as detailed and complex as a folding trimaran. It is very much in their own interest to demonstrate beyond doubt that they can excel in the small stuff if they want to instill faith that they will be able to handle the big stuff. I would like to see them carry on Ian's legacy but he isn't an easy act to follow.
  13. Plywood will last if you know how to treat it properly. I have a friend with a boat that has been on a mooring for a bit over 16years with ply floor boards they still look like new.
  14. When building my tri I extended the foam 40mm past the frames and applied two coast of resin that was amine blush free and managed a good seal that way. Initially I put a layer of microlight and resin , once cured, I sanded and then a coat of resin over that but found out as the project progressed the filler was not needed as two coats of resin were sufficient to fill the exposed cells of the corecell. foam. I would wait until the first coat went tacky before applying the second coat. With an amine blush free resin I could apply the tacky tape straight over the cured resin. I also had a coupl
  15. Now that is the $64,000 question! The next would be what is happening about spare parts like bushings and other components plan builders rely on purchasing from Farrier Marine?
  16. Sometimes you can get a minor mount of spring back. A minor amount would help when you glue them in as you could just prop the centre of the beam in order to clamp it in while the glue cures. Having said that the tighter the radius the more spring back you are likely to get. I suspect your radius will be such that the spring back will be hardly noticeable but could be enough to help with the final gluing in place.
  17. Two things in this thread have me scratching my head.. Why is the brummel lock under load. It sounds like the bury is just not deep enough. I am also stumped by the need to pull the halyard out of the mast. A Raz'r stated you only need one end of the line to do the splice and after some practice it can be done quite quickly. You can't do the splice through a hole in a fitting but if it is just a shackle would you just remove the pin?
  18. If building from 6mm ply 8oz is an overkill. 6mm ply is plenty strong and the glass is mainly there to hold the grain of the ply together to prevent water ingress as it ages. This does not take a lot, 6oz would be more than enough except for known abrasion areas. I have built a lot of boats from ply and if it was my dinghy I'd probably only use 4 oz as I would want it as light as practical. Instead of coating and curing and having to contend with the amine blush I would make sure the panels are cooling before applying a layer of epoxy. ( I have heated ply in the past to ensure this.) I woul
  19. When I have to replace them I think I'll do similar. I lace the noodles without splitting them as I think it gives a slightly wider buffer which is handy when picking up the mooring and I put the dinghy between the main hull and float of the tri. I will just sew up a canvas tube and slide them in. The cover is a nice touch.
  20. For an all around fender on my dinghy I just used pool noodles. Took around 20metres of line to lace them to the gunwales but they work great at projecting the side of my tri when pulling along side and cost very little. The have lasted 2 years in the sun and I may need to replace them in another couple of years. I'll admit the closed cell foam and sumbrella may look a little more stylish but it would be a lot more work. Both alternatives are doing the same job.
  21. I'd be very interested to learn the final weight of your build. Lookin' good.
  22. That is a neat setup as you could do any dia tube. The video did work and looks good. You are lucky to have someone to help with such projects. I usually just drill a hole in some timber and spin my tube in that. In the case of large dia tubes like the 90mm spin pole socket I had to make up an axle for the tube. (I also made a collapsible mandrel for that one so not quite the same. But spinning to compress the layup gives a really good structure. Not tried doing that with a sleave , it may not work as it can't really wind up the layup like it does when using cloth . I have uni betwee
  23. I think if you try to remove resin from your skin with acetone your skin is likely to absorb more of the thinned resin. Not a good option. It was also suggested that I clean my brushes with vinegar but I would never do that. Wiping a scraper off was one thing but I could never be sure that I could get all the vinegar out of the brush before using it again. It is surprisingly good at neutralising epoxy. It would be good to get a chemists take on why. All I know is that vinegar is acidic and I think epoxy is alkaline. Any chemists out there that could enlighten me further?
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