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Chris 249

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About Chris 249

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  1. No kidding. And I would love to know the circumstances by which the powers at the time decided that moveable ballast didn't make it a fair competition. And the boat was in all likelihood British so the bias would have been towards making it legal. For that matter what was the ballast? Barrels of rum? That seems OK. I did a bit of googling and didn't find much. Google books shows up a link that mentions Wildfire but not in any more detail though it does talk more about the civil war part which HHN92 summarizes well above. It does generally speak to the problem that faces any technical compe
  2. No kidding. And I would love to know the circumstances by which the powers at the time decided that moveable ballast didn't make it a fair competition. And the boat was in all likelihood British so the bias would have been towards making it legal. For that matter what was the ballast? Barrels of rum? That seems OK. I did a bit of googling and didn't find much. Google books shows up a link that mentions Wildfire but not in any more detail though it does talk more about the civil war part which HHN92 summarizes well above. It does generally speak to the problem that faces any technical compe
  3. The game isn't fun if abusive people like you keep on telling other people that we have no right to their opinions and that anyone who doesn't follow all of your ideas is a dickhead. It's also not fun if we have to deal with abusive people like you who tell us that we have no right to be involved in a class association, even if some of us have succeeded in reviving youth interest in classes that we run. The first time I had contact with you, on the Laser Forum, you were anything but welcoming - you were vicious, arrogant and abusive, simply because I politely expressed an opinion about
  4. The 505 is specifically NOT a development class, according to its designer and its other creators. As designer John Westell wrote in detail at the time, the fact that it's a one design is the basic point of the class. He specifically wrote that he felt that the traditional British model of restricted-development classes was going to suffer because of increasing cost and therefore a ONE DESIGN class was the way to go. The Coronet "prototype" was then picked up by owners from the Caneton development class, who asked Westell to modify the Coronet so that it could form the basis of a new ONE D
  5. With brilliant foreword thinking imaginative minds like yours I damn certain wouldn't be holding more computing power in my hand than NASA owned when men landed in the moon. Probably the key to the. $1000 14 foot sailboat is to stamp them out using way less material. If we built our toys weighing forty pounds or so, materials costs could be lowered along with shipping and all kinds of hurdles could disappear. Maybe the fold up suitcase boats need to be inflated with a sufficient pressure to achieve stiffness. Can we make roll up spars whose stiffness comes from folding hinged sheets
  6. The call for a $1000 Walmart Laser is way off base. The closest thing they sell seems to be a plastic 12' dinghy for $700. Who in the world is going to be able to add a quality centreboard, rudder, and rig AND make a hull tough enough for racing, for just an extra $300? Even the Snark sells for more than that, direct from the builder.
  7. It's the same down here in Oz, in big rigs at least. No one wants to try to race against the full-time Olympic aspirants; even people who finished top 3 in the Open Worlds immediately before the class went Olympic walked away as soon as it was selected for the Games. Ironically, some of the Olympians don't turn up to the Nationals. That annoys those who feel that the Olympians think that the Nationals are not good enough for them, but on the other hand it could be that, as in some other classes, some Olympians know that they are at a different level and therefore stay away so they don't demora
  8. And people sail Lasers for convenience and other very good reasons, not because their heads are in their arses.
  9. Well slight correction may be needed, It's about the medium to long term welfare of the Laser sailing dinghy. The rest of our sport will manage (shock, horror!) with or without the Laser. Slight correction. The sick and dying sport will continue to lie face down in its drool until any affordable well promoted " toy for everyone " is supported by a builder, local dealers, and a vibrant well organized promotionaly driven class association. Only if you believe that sailing can take part ONLY in SMODS. I enjoy sailing handicap races, knowing that some days the wind will favour me and
  10. Hughes from Tiga? Wow... he was a fun and innovative guy in windsurfing.
  11. It didn't take so long. Dave Keiper's cruising tri Williwaw was fully flying in the ocean in the late '60s. The video of the boat in action are shocking - the hull and rig looks extremely crude, about as efficient as an early Piver, but the boat smoked when foiling fast. Small cats like Icarus and Mayfly were foiling at Weymouth Speed Week in the '70s, and there were many other foilers at such events. Tabarly's tri Paul Ricard was using foils, adjusted by a pivoting main beam, when it was launched in '79 and other tris such as VSD were fitted with them for some time. The 26m (85' I
  12. I saw your posts in the Cheeki Rafiki thread. You mention your own large magazine collection and also 'going in' to the National Maritime Museum. My wife is currently writing an article on regatta/races in Asia Pacific region and she is looking for historical info covering Japan - Aus. Any tips on locating that type of info? Also is there digital access to the National Maritime Museum, or do you have to actually 'go in' ? Very interesting the solid information you are posti...

    1. Baldur

      Baldur

      about keel losses. If you saw my posts questioning whether or not keels actually fail more often. I don't doubt they do, I just want to see some actual data on it. I am looking forward to see what the results of your research are.

       

      -Kris

  13. 19 in the UK in 2002, actually. A class that was almost impossible to enter because if you hadn't already been sailing Moths for years, it was virtually impossible to learn to sail a modern boat of that era. No newcomers = dying class. Yes, 19 in the UK, about 28 in in Australia (fleets in the early '00s ranged from 23 to 43) and about 15 in Germany equals "about 65 in Australia, Germany and the UK" as I said. 19+28+15-ish = about 65. Huge fleets? No. Comparable to some other classes that have not died? Yes; classes of similar size (the Cherub in the UK, Canoe, RS300 etc) are still al
  14. Sure, Moths were quiet in 2002. About 65 boats did nationals in Australia, Germany and the UK. The UK reported growing interest. That does not mean that the class as a whole was "nearly dead", unless one puts some classes that SA gets very excited about into the same category. "Dying"? Dunno, lots of classes have hung on for many years with similar numbers. "Numbers not growing"? I didn't say that. Moth numbers have clearly been growing since about the time BR came along and the class is doing well, especially in the UK it seems. However, the absolute number of boats actually regularly rac
  15. Clean and GG; 1 - Foil assist classes are (IMHO) relevant because foil assistance involved the same sort of reasoning and some of the same technical issues as full foiling. Therefore to spend just a single sentence referring to their experience, which is all I did, is reasonable. 2 - Yes, there are differences between cats and monos. It doesn't seem to be clear whether those differences will make multi foilers more popular than monofoilers. It's also possible that the multifoilers may actually have similar issues to monofoilers. For example, GG said with AC-style multis, "the foils
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