SloopJonB

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Everything posted by SloopJonB

  1. Crowhursts boat actually sailed as well - for years afterwards.
  2. SloopJonB

    Mocking Ads on Craigslist

    Hey, it's only one boat length inland. The travel lift puts my boat farther inland than that! What could go wrong - it says it's risk free right in the ad.
  3. It looks like he took his design inspiration from the Merrimac. "If it hold together" is the whole point of this thread isn't it? If it stays intact into the water and floats, it could be towed up the delta and used as a float home I guess.
  4. SloopJonB

    Mocking Ads on Craigslist

    Here's a gem from Vancouver CL - only $40K. I especially like the shot of the transom corner. http://vancouver.en.craigslist.ca/bnc/boa/3813536299.html
  5. SloopJonB

    Uglyboat Admiration Society Hang Out

    If you know the owner, give him the attached proc. Checking the Accuracy of a Tachometer. There is a way to check the accuracy of a tachometer using the highly accurate and stable frequency of AC power supplied from any source of commercial shore power. The concept is to use the AC line frequency as the measuring standard. The only tools needed for this calibration check are a piece of tape and a fluorescent lamp which operates from commercial AC line power. A fluorescent lamp is actually a gas-discharge lamp with the interior of the glass envelope coated with a light-emitting phosphor. When the gas within the lamp is ionized by alternating current it emits pulses of energy. One pulse occurs for each of the voltage excursions of the AC waveform. For the 60-Hz power common in North America, there will be 120 such flashes per second, 60 positive and 60 negative. The pulses of energy created within the lamp excite the phosphor coating, which in turn emits visible light. Because the energy driving the lamp is not continuous, the light emitted is not continuous. The fluorescent lamp emits 120 pulses of light per second, but the human eye's persistence of vision makes us think the light is always on. We can use the pulsing light output of the fluorescent light as a very accurate measuring tool with which to check the calibration of the engine tachometer. First, obtain access to the front of the engine. Place one piece of white tape on the face of the large pulley mounted on the engine's crankshaft (usually this is the largest pulley in sight). Illuminate the front of the engine with light from the fluorescent lamp. Run the engine at 1,800 rpm, as shown on the tachometer. If the tachometer is accurate, four stationery, or very slowly moving, white marks will appear on the face of the pulley where the tape was placed. If the tachometer is inaccurate, the tape marks may be rotating in either direction. Adjust the throttle until the four tape marks appear to stand still. Note the tachometer reading. If the difference between the reading and 1,800 rpm is at all significant, look for a small adjustment screw on the back or within the body of the tachometer. Turning this screw slightly should make the indicator needle move to exactly 1,800 rpm. If the speed range of the engine permits, increase the engine speed to 3,600 rpm. At this speed, only two tape marks should be visible on the crankshaft pulley. Repeat the check of the tachometer reading and, if necessary, readjust the tach. The basis of this stroboscopic speed calibration is quite simple. At 1,800 rpm, the engine is turning at 30 revolutions per second. The lamp is flashing at 120 flashes per second, or four flashes per engine revolution. Therefore, if the engine is turning at exactly 30 revolutions per second the tape mark will appear four times, with each apparent tape position 1/120 of a second or 1/4 revolution apart. When the engine runs at 3,600 rpm there will be only two light flashes per engine revolution. If the boat is in a country where the standard AC power frequency is 50 Hz, the check speeds would have to be 1,500 and 3,000 rpm since the light would flash 100 times per second.
  6. SloopJonB

    Restoration Ron Holland IOR racer Flirt of Paget (2)

    Is that finish on the bottom of the steps just rolled on Epifanes or did you tip it? They look like black glass. That boat is going to be a lot better than new when you're done - looks fabulous.
  7. SloopJonB

    Coolboats to admire

    If that is the extent of your taste, a LONG swim back to port would be a great idea.
  8. SloopJonB

    Uglyboat Admiration Society Hang Out

    O/K people - is it uglier or better looking than that RoRo carrier on the other side of the river? I say better looking because it has a mast with a gaff & ratlines and a sprit with netting. Gawd those RoRo ships are ugly - I'd be ashamed to work on one of them.
  9. SloopJonB

    Mocking Ads on Craigslist

    Here's a gem that has been running on Seattle CL for several years. Only $4500 - such a deal! It looks like it suffered a propane explosion. http://seattle.craigslist.org/see/boa/3797102388.html
  10. SloopJonB

    Uglyboat Admiration Society Hang Out

    Have you sailed them? How can you say their level of functionality if not? One biggy to remember- Phil Bolger designed a lot of beautiful boats... You missed my point. I'm sure they work well, I simply meant that they are ONLY function - form not only followed, it never entered the equation with them. Not the first time I've missed a point, sorry about that. However if you want to follow a philosophical conundrum, why else is there form? There is a difference between a boat and a painting. It's certainly valid to regard boats as dynamic sculpture; but at the end of the day the fact remains they have a job to do. Utility is beauty. There is a very definite and material reason why men prefer large boobs! FB- Doug Ironic you should choose that particular illustration. In reality, women with big boobs very frequently have great difficulty breast feeding. They may look great etc. but they frequently don't work well.
  11. SloopJonB

    Uglyboat Admiration Society Hang Out

    I got my first sailing experience in a real, old fashioned stone boat - one of those old wooden troughs that concrete was mixed in. It had a sapling mast and bedsheet sail and was assembled by a couple of 11 & 12 year old brothers. It didn't leak so I guess it was an early variant of a ferro boat. I still remember it as one of the best days I ever had on the water but it was OGLY. I've never been much of a fan of corners or flat panels on boats. I'll bow to your eye Bob but I'd rather have one of your boats than anything PB ever drew - even (or especially) one of your cartoon boats.
  12. SloopJonB

    Uglyboat Admiration Society Hang Out

    Have you sailed them? How can you say their level of functionality if not? One biggy to remember- Phil Bolger designed a lot of beautiful boats; in fact I don't think anybody has matched his ability to combine classic looks, bringing aesthetics of many different types as well not just one region, and making them into practical and relatively easy to build boats. The HMS Rose is still sailing, for example, along with her baby duckling shallop & pinnace (which are just as great achievements IMHO). Spartina is a another great example. It would be very unfortunate if Bolger were mostly be remembered for his "box boats" but I have personally built & sailed/rowed two of them, and been around a half-dozen more. The ones I know about work. In fact they are a lot more practical than most mass-produced boats of the same size; and only in the post-crash era of dirt-cheap 2nd-hand boats have the mass-produced ones become less expensive to own. FB- Doug You missed my point. I'm sure they work well, I simply meant that they are ONLY function - form not only followed, it never entered the equation with them.
  13. SloopJonB

    Uglyboat Admiration Society Hang Out

    I believe in form following function but there's a limit. Bolger's boats and the others like them crossed that line several times a day.
  14. SloopJonB

    Uglyboat Admiration Society Hang Out

    No it isn't. A beautiful boat on the hard is still a beautiful piece of sculpture. An ugly boat on the water is still an ugly boat.
  15. Navy Seal survival training...and full Seal equipment.
  16. It would decrease them from none at all to less than zero. At least with the cat there should be some big pieces of flotsam to climb on to await rescue. A comparable mono would go down faster than that AC boat in San Diego a few years back.
  17. SloopJonB

    Mocking Ads on Craigslist

    A Seafarer, judging from the cove stripe. I'm not familiar with the model, but their original designs were by McCurdy & Rhodes (IIRC). You can be sure it didn't have the porthole in the bow when it left the factory. Trying to restore that boat would be insane but it might be a good candidate for a Tim Lackey style conversion to an open day boat. It's a good looking hull - take a wrecking bar and big hammer inside and clean it out, cut the house off etc. For someone with the wherewithal, it could make a very nice & unique boat for cheap + a lot of work - offer $200 and start the demolition. If you don't know about Lackey, check out Lackeysailing.com - the daysailer project.
  18. SloopJonB

    Mocking Ads on Craigslist

    Here's a perfect example. I noticed he no longer mentions the absence of a leg. Needs stringers, floors, interior and deck but NO LEAKS. http://vancouver.en.craigslist.ca/rch/boa/3745354548.html
  19. "It is not the critic who counts: not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes up short again and again, because there is no effort without error or shortcoming, but who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, who spends himself for a worthy cause; who, at the best, knows, in the end, the triumph of high achievement, and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who knew neither victory nor defeat." Everyone should serve as an example for others. Hotrod serves more as a warning than an example. I agree with TR about trying and doing but that doesn't compensate for a dangerous level of ignorance and/or stupidity. Would you also support an adult who started trying to "dig through to China" like we did when we were 4 years old? "At least he's trying"?
  20. Send in some nice men in white suits to take him to the nice hospital and then bring in the bulldozers and backhoes.
  21. Two 9.9's outboards ??? I would have guessed two 671's for that big load. But you're not nuts. Is the C.G. aware of this mess?
  22. What's the problem? Looks well gusseted to me.
  23. It's just come to me...... it's going to be a static movie prop.
  24. SloopJonB

    Uglyboat Admiration Society Hang Out

    That reminds of of all those kids spending huge amounts of money "improving" cheap econoboxes instead of spending the money on a better car. That attitude is always with us - I can remember when I was a kid, lots of people had "hot rods" where the wheels were worth more than the car. That little Cape Dory? is much the same mindset.
  25. SloopJonB

    Uglyboat Admiration Society Hang Out

    Inspired, no doubt by the XF-85 Goblin, which actually flew. Man, those early "Jet Age" test pilots had cojones the size of beach balls.