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Coquina012

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About Coquina012

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    Anarchist

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  • Location
    Fiddletown, CA
  • Interests
    Fiddling. Occasionally, faddling.

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  1. I think G10 would work for the bearings (the oarlock and the 3 insert pins).
  2. All good points. Stainless steel corrodes with "crevice corrosion" when not exposed. However, your point underscores my feeling about it as well--how much can it possibllly corrode in this application? Probably very little. The second question, is it necessary--I think it might not be necessary as well. The attachment points (metal pins) at the hull and and oarlock itself, are points of constant motion, and thus wear. Eventually, an oarlock will wear an ellipse at the insert. But how long is eventually? One year, or 200? Since this is belt and suspender engineering, I would be int
  3. I am hand laminating some carbon fiber rowing outriggers. I want to put a supporting strip of metal on the interior, both for bolts to pass through and for the oarlocks to attach. I understand that stainless steel will corrode embedded in carbon. Obviously, the metal will not come into contact with saltwater directly, but I also understand that crevice corrosion can damage it. These are recreational rowing fixtures, so I might be overthinking this one. What metal should I choose for this? I have some 3/16" stainless steel blanks laying around that would be ideal...
  4. I rented a C22 from SeaForth, above. Super nice guys, not cheap, but it's SD so get out your wallet. Santa Ana winds in the afternoon this time of year can hit 50s off the coast. We sailed yesterday in perfect weather but the owners did not want us to go outside of the Bay due to SA winds. We respected their request and stayed inside, great day.
  5. Thanks, that is a fair offer. Owner needs these out ASAP--my schedule won't permit it. I have until tomorrow to scratch something up. I can't even find one to move to another storage area. Durn.
  6. Not sure if this qualifies as dinghy--I found a Catalina 18, keel version, not CB, and I need to rent or buy a trailer, if anyone has one laying around....not committed to the purchase yet but almost free if I can haul it.
  7. Anyone have a keelboat trailer to either sell or rent, SD area? I have run across a Catalina 18 and want to move it either up North to Bay Area (if I find a trailer for sale), or perhaps to local slip (if I can't find one for sale and need to rent). Boat must be moved. Haven't committed, checking out options.
  8. It's a funny coincidence but I was reading a very expensive looking CLC catalogue that popped up in the mail and their Sailing Canoe, mentioned above, Wanderlust, was the star of the catalogue to my eyes. What a beauty.
  9. Very nice. My Bob Hoare (light) restoration is on hold but it will get going soon.
  10. I am past the temptation point on this one. Even if it were given to me, which deal I could work out, the solution is too much project over 9 million other projects I have going on. The mast is aluminum with internal electrics, stepped to a stainless steel apron. I don't know about spreaders, but it probably leaks there too, slightly. It is fine work, and good materials. Except...standing mast up in the rain for a year and a half. The above suggestion of creating a drain is what it needs.
  11. I think I understand what the boat needs. But at the end of the day--perhaps this is why plywood seems to be a seldom used material for larger boats (20' and up). If you can't unstep the mast, sweet water is going to pool in a boat that is used twice a month. Bummer.
  12. I hear you. The most likely offender is the slug channel, but I recognize is might be electrics or simply, the outside of the mast.
  13. I am looking at a 30 ft. ish wooden boat for sale. Think stretched Thunderbird. Ply/glass construction. It is sitting on the hard, and at least without throwing some serious money at the craft, it is at a tipping point in its entropy. Everything in good shape; stored mast up, and thus usable without full re-rigging, on a trailer in a yard with a free sling. But anyone who has spent time around wooden boats knows that rainwater ingress is the nicotine that blights the lungs. The standing mast is channeling rain water straight into the step. And it has begun. The interior has the unmis
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