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2 hours ago, See Level said:

Are those the composite blades? Was there antifouling on them? 

I had a client hauled at CSR yesterday and noticed a lot more barnacles then usual.

YES Composite blades, no antifoul. The summers here always bring out the barnacles, BlakelyHarbor is very clean so we always have fouling problems. That’s why I have a regular dive service, but we had skipped them while one or the other boat was at CSR. Guess we won’t do that again. 

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Eight years ago today we lost Spike Perry. The SLIVER project was started just about that time. The project was then dedicated to the memory of Spike. The Spike Burgee will fly on FRANC

I think Legs has it right. I check SA and CA everyday. If I think I have something to add to the discussion I'll post it. With over 6,600 fan club members on Facebook now that keeps me prett

Took FRANKIE over to Shilshole today and turned her over to Green Card for some love and attention. I towed my Hadlock 23 Skiff behind so I had a way to get back home. It was strange watchin

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2 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

The Islands Trust actually authorized a new marina on Salt Spring?

Will wonders never cease!

Apparently it is the restoration of the old Salts Spring Marina at the end of the bay. Just past Ship Wreck Rock, which apparently will be removed as part of the project. 

Dredging was going full bore while we were at Ganges Marina right next door.

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Nice dinghy Kim! looks better from the rear though (I think). Did you take it on your recent cruise? Good on you for going solar and cruising generator-free. A bunch of us going North right after Festival. Be cool to share an anchorage with you (being generator free and all). All of us will have PT 11's, so we could have a regatta or something.

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HELP!

I am trying to find two Harken 53.2 electric self tailing winches with vertical motors.

I currently have one of these mounted centrally in the steering cockpit which we use for halyards (specifically the main halyard.)

I want to convert the two 53.2 ST sheet winches in the aft cockpit to electric so they match, but they must have the vertical motor configuration, no room for horizontal.

Apparently Harken’s conversion kit for the 53.2 is only available with a horizontally mounted motor. (I purchased my vertical one in about 2013, so their must be some still out there.)

Are there a couple vertical electric Harken 53.2 ST winches hiding somewhere? The challenge will be to find them.

This is a pretty big community, hope someone can produce a lead....

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8 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Are you up for switching to Harken Radial? Fisheries Supply shows a few vertical options there. https://www.fisheriessupply.com/harken-aluminum-hydraulic-radial-self-tailing-winches

 

The problem with those is they are smaller and do not match the existing bolt holes. So it would require reworking the deck (assuming they would have enough power to handle the sheet loads.)

Also switching to hydraulic would be a pain, I need 12 volt motors.

Kind of a last resort option.

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19 minutes ago, kimbottles said:

The problem with those is they are smaller and do not match the existing bolt holes. So it would require reworking the deck (assuming they would have enough power to handle the sheet loads.)

Also switching to hydraulic would be a pain, I need 12 volt motors.

Kind of a last resort option.

Gotcha. I kinda glossed over the hydraulic part.

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11 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

Have you talked to Harken, maybe they could convert your existing winches...

Yes, I have, they have a conversion kit for my winch but it has a horizontal motor only. No room for that configuration. Must go vertical like my existing electric winch. Kind of strange they don’t offer that kit in vertical given they used to sell that winch in the vertical configuration so they already know how to do it. Must not be enough demand.

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3 hours ago, RedRyder said:

For those who might have missed it, FL can be seen on page 22 of the August/September 2019 BoatUS magazine.

Really?

Can you scan and post here for those of us who are not BoatUS members?

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1 hour ago, viktor said:

Will you be going to wood boat this year?  Don't know how that blank post got there, nor how to get rid of it.

You can hide it. Look under "Options" at the bottom of the post.

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On 7/14/2019 at 3:47 AM, kimbottles said:

A year ago I got a call from Frank Schattauer the sailmaker telling me he had an almost new tri-radial reaching full hoist (plus) asymmetrical kite that he thought would fit FRANCIS. .75 ounce with the cloth doubled on the luff.

Well for various reasons we did not get to try it out until today. (I usually sail very short handed,) today I had three other experienced sailors aboard and we had no trouble handling the monster. SWMBO really liked the ride!

8.1 knots boat speed in 6 knots apparent wind. 150 true 90 apparent. What a ride. Great sail. Cheap too! ATN sock.

We sailed her north in a weak southerly and then waited for the windshift and sailed back home in a weak northerly.

Several times we sailed out of the wind and had to wait for it to catch up.

It does not get much better than that!

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That must have been magical.

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The sailboat guy (Chris) at Fisheries Supply found some vertical electric conversion kits at Harken in Italy for me!

Now that is customer service!! He did not give up until he had tried every possibility.

I have worked with Chris in the past, first rate guy.

Bravo!

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4 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Sounds like time for a bottle of single malt in a gift bag.

Congrats - that IS good customer service, a rare thing these days.

I have always received quality service from Fisheries. But this was above and beyond the call of duty. Harken USA said they were no longer available, Chris didn’t give up, he kept digging and found them at Harken Italy. Now that is great customer service!

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I have just been researching self tailing winches for the V40, and discovered Enkes still sell self tailing conversion kits for the original primary and secondary winches...

Just have to check they have a thread on the main shaft, only problem is the kits cost as much as new Harkens...

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2 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

Didn’t you source your superseded secondaries from Italy as well Kim?

Yup! One of them. The other came from Wisconsin.

Good memory there Olaf.

I just renewed my ORC cert. Looks like I will have to update it when I add electric winches.

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1 hour ago, IStream said:

Is it just me or does the other side of that bulkhead now look like it needs a big flat screen TV to balance the look?

:ph34r:

We don’t do TV at home, so why would we do it on our getawayfromitall vessel?

What I need is a big picture of my dad Frank there (Francis Lee Bottles).

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I don’t know about you guys, but I hate drilling holes in my sailboat.

But I need another pad eye to lead to the center electric winch, so I measured a zillion times today and then screwed up my courage.

Holes are oversized and filled with thickened epoxy. Tomorrow I drill out for the fasteners.

The rectangle shows where the backing plate will be on the underside of the cored deck.

This location is right between a vertical bulkhead and the vertical back of the forward cockpit, so very stiff.

That is the max sized backing plate that will fit between the vertical surfaces.

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I usually measure a dozen times, take a break, measure again just to make sure, chuck up the bit, and stand there looking at it for a few minutes before I actually cut anything. The bigger the hole, or the more of them, the longer it takes me to screw up the courage.

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7 minutes ago, IStream said:

I usually measure a dozen times, take a break, measure again just to make sure, chuck up the bit, and stand there looking at it for a few minutes before I actually cut anything. The bigger the hole, or the more of them, the longer it takes me to screw up the courage.

I share your pain......

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1 hour ago, kimbottles said:

I don’t know about you guys, but I hate drilling holes in my sailboat.

I'm right there with you.  I re-did the deck gear on either side of my companionway last year, removing the hodge-podge assortment of 1980s winches and clutches, filling 43 (!) holes with thickened epoxy, fairing/sanding/gelcoating/polishing the area and then laying out a new configuration that works for the way I sail my boat.

By *far* the hardest part of the job was drilling that first hole in the "blank canvas" I'd created.

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21 minutes ago, Panope said:

I drilled a hole in a customers hull for a fridge keel cooler, the other day.  I used "the force" instead of a tape measure. 

Worked just a good for me as it did for Luke.

Steve

Fine for you maybe. But the force is not strong with this one...

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18 hours ago, kimbottles said:

I don’t know about you guys, but I hate drilling holes in my sailboat.

 

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I was fitting out a new racing dinghy a few years back when I got a call from the boat builder,  'The boat's getting painted next week.  If you come down and bang a load of holes in it for the fittings this weekend I can fill them and paint over them when you fuck up.'  You can make fitting holes really fast under those circumstances.  Saved me days.

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Took SWMBO and two others out sailing yesterday to try out the new lead of the main halyard to electric winch pad-eye. (The lead was better than the other pad-eye so the hole drilling and epoxy filling was worth it.)

SWMBO seemed more willing to leave the cockpit and participate at other places aboard. I asked her why, she responded: “lifelines”.

She admits it is all psychological as she never touched the lifelines. But she likes knowing that they are there.

Guess it was worth it.

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21 hours ago, kimbottles said:

So true, and after 52 years with her I like her to be happy.....

I believe that's how all this works.  :D

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I am currently crewing on BV’s beautiful classic Alden schooner MAYAN in the Classic Class of the Rolex Big Boat Regatta at the StFYC in San Francisco Bay.

Kimball Livingston and I decided we the two Kim’s aboard MAYAN should get our picture taken, we did not expect Paul Cayard who is aboard our rival OCEAN QUEEN to photo-bomb us. (He was put up to it by Commodore Paul of StFYC who took the picture.)

The racing in the Classic Class has been epic! Drag races to the finish line between WATER WITCH, OCEAN QUEEN and MAYAN. LFH’s JOANN (now named BRIGADOON) keeps beating us all out on corrected, but we three vessels are have a blast in boat to boat battles.

Jim Teeters of ORA took this great shot of the first day drag race to the finish.

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Today, more photos from Jim Teeters.

That last shot was at our start when the J-105 fleet was rounding right at our line.

Fortunately there was no contact and we did not have to push any J-105’s off our bowsprit.

The last two pictures caught us tacking.

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Won the last day, first to finish (MAYAN did a horizon job on the other classics) and finally we beat BRIGADOON on corrected. So we were 2 2 2 1 to BRIGADOON ‘s 1 1 1 2.

MAYAN is a magic boat with a great crew and a wonderful owner. One of the best times I have ever had on the water.

(We had Bill Lee aboard calling sail trim for every race and sailing with the WIZARD is indeed a great pleasure. For being such a Sailing Icon he sure is down to earth and fun to be with.)

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2 hours ago, kimbottles said:

For the few ham radio operators here I visited Elecraft yesterday and got a demo of the not yet released K-4 from Bob (K6XX). Very impressive rig. Smaller and lighter than I thought it would be.

https://elecraft.com/pages/k4-pre-order

It looks very...complex. But no remote, no front/back fader, no bass or treble controls, apparently no way to control your onboard TV. I think you can do better.

k4-front-white-bg-product_e95bea0d-18ae-

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On 9/3/2019 at 8:52 PM, IStream said:

I usually measure a dozen times, take a break, measure again just to make sure, chuck up the bit, and stand there looking at it for a few minutes before I actually cut anything. The bigger the hole, or the more of them, the longer it takes me to screw up the courage.

Better to screw up your courage than the boat.

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Sharon Green was really busy at the Rolex Big Boat Series....and really brave too. I watched her snap this shot and was wondering it they (she and her boat driver) were going to get out of the way before they collected a 70,000 schooner in their lap. 

(I have driven photo boats for Neil Rabinowitz so I know how brave and demanding sailing photographers can be.)

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5 hours ago, Panoramix said:

That's quite a few sails to trim. It must be frantic on board when you bear away, tack or gybe!

Easy, everyone aboard was experienced so it was fairly smooth once we all got synced together.

AND we had Bill Lee as our sailing master, the Wizard called trim. Kind of hard to improve on him.

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5 hours ago, kimbottles said:

Easy, everyone aboard was experienced so it was fairly smooth once we all got synced together.

AND we had Bill Lee as our sailing master, the Wizard called trim. Kind of hard to improve on him.

Yes, I can imagine that you don't want too many beginners around but it must be really impressive!

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9 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

Yes, I can imagine that you don't want too many beginners around but it must be really impressive!

Well, It was a hell of a lot of fun, I can report that!!

And because of our ORANGE attire everyone on shore knew we were schooner sailors.

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On 9/17/2019 at 1:19 PM, woahboy said:
On 9/3/2019 at 9:52 PM, IStream said:

I usually measure a dozen times, take a break, measure again just to make sure, chuck up the bit, and stand there looking at it for a few minutes before I actually cut anything. The bigger the hole, or the more of them, the longer it takes me to screw up the courage.

 Better to screw up your courage than the boat.

On my first cruising boat, I had a tiny divot in the gel coat on the port side of the deck. I was installing the fill for a new fresh water tank and had second thoughts just as I pulled the trigger on the drill for a pilot hole.  Glad I rechecked. I used the aft lower chain plate as a landmark on deck and the intermediate/upper chain plate below. I would have drilled a hole in salon overhead rather than into a locker had I not stopped. 

Sometimes measuring twice isn’t enough. 

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On 7/12/2019 at 10:56 AM, kimbottles said:

The problem with R2AK is they won’t just let me seal the Yanmar, I have to remove it entirely. And then how do we supply human power on a 19,200 pound vessel (18,900+/- ) if the Yanmar was removed),

(She does thunder to weather in a breeze, so she has that part well covered)

Bringing human power to bear on such a large vessel would be an interesting challenge. 

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I actually do know how to scull and have done it many times, but on much smaller vessels.

My dad (Francis Lee Bottles) taught me how when I was still just a lad.

He was into the simple style of boating (oh, maybe that’s where I got the simple boating gene.)

But I suspect a scull long enough to move FRANKIE would find the backstay an obstruction to the nice long sweeping style I like while sculling if we used the stern roller.

More likely we might make it kind of work if we lashed the scull to the backstay adjuster and pumped up the pressure to hold it steady.

I have seen a style of sculling that kind of did a half sweep which might work with the roller, but I have never tried it myself.

Ish’s galley slaves seems like a better solution. Plenty of crazy people here to recruit.

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42 minutes ago, kimbottles said:

I actually do know how to scull and have done it many times, but on much smaller vessels.

My dad (Francis Lee Bottles) taught me how when I was still just a lad.

He was into the simple style of boating (oh, maybe that’s where I got the simple boating gene.)

But I suspect a scull long enough to move FRANKIE would find the backstay an obstruction to the nice long sweeping style I like while sculling if we used the stern roller.

More likely we might make it kind of work if we lashed the scull to the backstay adjuster and pumped up the pressure to hold it steady.

I have seen a style of sculling that kind of did a half sweep which might work with the roller, but I have never tried it myself.

Ish’s galley slaves seems like a better solution. Plenty of crazy people here to recruit.

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Rig up a Venetian gondola setup - that should clear everything. :D

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41 minutes ago, kimbottles said:

I actually do know how to scull and have done it many times, but on much smaller vessels.

My dad (Francis Lee Bottles) taught me how when I was still just a lad.

He was into the simple style of boating (oh, maybe that’s where I got the simple boating gene.)

But I suspect a scull long enough to move FRANKIE would find the backstay an obstruction to the nice long sweeping style I like while sculling if we used the stern roller.

More likely we might make it kind of work if we lashed the scull to the backstay adjuster and pumped up the pressure to hold it steady.

I have seen a style of sculling that kind of did a half sweep which might work with the roller, but I have never tried it myself.

Ish’s galley slaves seems like a better solution. Plenty of crazy people here to recruit.

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Yes, definitely not the easiest to set up. To make it actually work I can only imagine some kind of outrigger contraption to allow an oarlock to be offset on the side (or one on each side!) to clear the backstay. 10 tonnes of displacement is definitely pushing it but as the boat is really narrow and slippery, may be that could work. To be honest I've never sculled anything displacing more than a few tonnes, the hard bit is to get it going.

But yes, rowing is definitely easier....

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Am I the only one wondering if the Francis Lee's rudder could be used to scull? I don't really ever scull. I think it is terrible for most boats. And I have had boats that it just didn't work on. But some boats, like those in the Express 27 fleet here in SF Bay seem to use it to great effect.

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Here is one way to acquire a forcola,

     Kim, you weren't in Venice recently were you?

 

 

     Theft on Sunday afternoon at the Fistomba where unknown people stole the gondola's fork. This is the characteristic scalmo on which the gondolier (the pope) places the oar to be able to row with the traditional Venetian rowing technique. "The forcola is a work of art, a sculpture in wood, but also a refined" technical "tool, the fulcrum, to allow the" guide "of the gondola with a single oar (the lever). The Fistomba Gondola is 11.25 meters long. Without a fork, a gondola cannot perform its regular passenger transport service, "explain the Traditional Venetian Boat managers.

Theft

Transferred the boat on Tuesday evening from Battaglia Terme and moored at the Fistomba Park, all its accessories were taken in the burcio Nuova Maria, dry inside the fenced shed, closed by a padlock and located in the Park's floodplain area. fenced vault. On Sunday afternoon the bitter surprise: to enter, a part of the fence was demolished and then the forcola, hidden inside the burcio, was stolen, "For its characteristics it is a" targeted "theft. Nothing else has been removed that is abundantly in the shed, inside which the Burcio is dry. Not even the other moving objects of the gondola. Only the forcola was taken, although it was hidden inside the Burcio, accessible via a ladder. Someone thought: "if there is

 

No service

The result is having prevented the use of the Gondola as a service to the Fistomba Park. We had to start the laps just yesterday, Sunday 20 May. The initiative is promoted by TVB, the Paduan association that recovers and enhances the traditional Venetian boats, along with the Fraglia of the boats and Paduan gondoliers. A new forcola costs over 1000 euros. Used it could cost between 400 and 700 euros. It remains only to appeal publicly: "Who wants to sell a popola for gondola, please contact Maurizio at cellullare 3487077807".


 

Potrebbe interessarti: http://www.padovaoggi.it/cronaca/furto-forcola-gondola-padova-21-maggio-2018.html
Seguici su Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/PadovaOggi/199447200092925

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Here is a nice 'scalmo' from an Italian catalog that has a flange for the retaining strop. This is going in my 'parts catalog' for future use hopefully.

 

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4 hours ago, kimbottles said:

If I do that do I have to learn to sing too Jon?

Only SWMBO can decide that.

French sailor shirts and silly hats would appear to be mandatory though.

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