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Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor


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Wow, an electric Seagull that weighs in at 750lbs inc batteries. :blink:

 

Some people will go to great lengths to keep all the belching associated with power generation at a great distance from the actual boat being powered.

 

Their boats tend to stay attached to the water. Whatever floats (or flies) your boat! ;)

 

15whalerjump.jpg

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Eight years ago today we lost Spike Perry. The SLIVER project was started just about that time. The project was then dedicated to the memory of Spike. The Spike Burgee will fly on FRANC

I think Legs has it right. I check SA and CA everyday. If I think I have something to add to the discussion I'll post it. With over 6,600 fan club members on Facebook now that keeps me prett

Took FRANKIE over to Shilshole today and turned her over to Green Card for some love and attention. I towed my Hadlock 23 Skiff behind so I had a way to get back home. It was strange watchin

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Hell that almsot as light as Perkins 4-108.

 

 

Hmmm,

 

1) into the sauce last night Maestro?

2) I know what you mean---- the English language requires too many unnecessary words. Sometimes a guy just has to say "enough"

3) While 1 and 2 may still apply, perhaps you were obsessing about the middle line in some Haiku you were working on. But, in that case, I think you'd have to trim it back to:

 

"almsot as light as Perkins"

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Is that a 1976 Boson Whaler 15' Sport w/ a 70 hp Johnson?!? :)

 

Wow, an electric Seagull that weighs in at 750lbs inc batteries. :blink:

 

Some people will go to great lengths to keep all the belching associated with power generation at a great distance from the actual boat being powered.

 

Their boats tend to stay attached to the water. Whatever floats (or flies) your boat! ;)

 

15whalerjump.jpg

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That's actually a 1979 model, bought in 1978, but the hull did not change for a lot of years before and after. My current one is an 80's boat with the same hull.

 

I'm envious. I grew up with a 15' whaler. :wub:

 

fantastic fun.

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That's actually a 1979 model, bought in 1978, but the hull did not change for a lot of years before and after. My current one is an 80's boat with the same hull.

 

I'm envious. I grew up with a 15' whaler. :wub:

 

fantastic fun.

 

I grew up with one of the original 13' sport models. It was one of the first 3 on Puget Sound. I inherited it from my dad and still have it. I will pass it on to my son. Great boats.

 

One of the guys a the local marine hardware store had a 13 that he (over)powered with a 50 hp Merc. He launched off of a wave and tore some of the bottom out when he landed on a deadhead, but he made it back to the dock.

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I have spent lots of hours in friends' 13s and used to own an 11 Whaler. One friend put a 55 on his 13 and it flew. His brother flipped it on one occasion, rammed a marker on another, as I recall.

 

I arrived at the Key Biscayne Yacht Club one day and spotted a 13 w/a 55, but it was newer than my buddy's boat. I wondered which other lunatic did that. As I walked past the boat, I noted that the driver sat on a molded in part of the boat, not a wooden thwart seat. I stepped back to be sure. Yep, it was an 11 w/ a 55. That's going too far, even for me. ;)

 

The 15 is really the only one with a decent, dry ride, and I include the 17 in that statement. They made some bigger boats that ride nice, but for the money you can buy nicer boats, IMO.

 

Now, where is Kim with our Monday update on the Sliver project?

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Now, where is Kim with our Monday update on the Sliver project?

 

Sorry, had another project I needed to attend to today so no Sliver visit today.......(maybe I can get Bruce, Jordan or Fred to send me some pictures......)

 

(If you are disappointed with no update, just think how I feel!!)

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Since Kimb did not make it to his project this weekend, my wife and I felt obligated to fill in for him. It started with a trip to Sequim this weekend for a bike ride (18 miles, 5100 feet of elevation gain, but that is another story). Along the way I saw signs for Port Hadlock where I could not remember having been. Once there we went down to the shore for a look and discovered the Wooden Boat School having a open house.

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There was a cute tender designed by some guy known for double enders,

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And the prototype of the SCAMP, even cooler in person than in the videos I have seen,

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After a little while I started to figure out that the Sliver must be near, so I asked one of the instructers on site and he pointed us up hill to the big boat shop, I hope Kimb does not mind my posting some pics, (perhaps better to beg forgivness after than to ask permission first)

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Jordan was manning the shop and was very patient with me as we spent half an hour or more asking questions and wandering around with my tongue hanging out, he was very knowledgable and the time he spent discussing the materials and constrution was amazing.

 

Looking aft,

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Interior almost ready to drop in,

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Deck and cockpit looking close to being flipped,

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What I was left with was the scale of the project, the top of the bow is a good 15 ft above th floor, the rowing shell is 16-18 feet long (and for sale)

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It started with a trip to Sequim this weekend for a bike ride (18 miles, 5100 feet of elevation gain, but that is another story).

 

So how was Hurricane Ridge? Did you start at the Ranger Station or the entry gate?

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There was a cute tender designed by some guy known for double enders,

DSC_0323.jpg

 

 

 

Yeah, I missed out on getting one of those shortly after we bought Brigadoon. I'm pretty sure that's a Perry Winkle. Though I have the factory, faux-wood (fiberglass) dingy on my davits, I'd love to have one of these.

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kimb, my pleasure, once again I would like to thank you for sharing this with us. We are heading out on the boat tonight, so depending weather tides and how energetic we are you may see us.

 

Hurricane was great. A perfect day and they had closed the road to cars. We started in town 6 miles below the ranger station.

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Here is another scamp pic,

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BJ:

Yes, that is a PERRYWINKLE dink. It rows very well and sails well but it's not a great boat to tow unless you have the trim tab in the gudgeons to keep the stern from squatting.

I hate cute boats but it looks like I drew at least one.

 

Steele:

Thanks for the most excellant photos of the Sliver. There is no way I'm going to miss seeing that interior get lowered into the hull. I'll be at the boat next Thursday for a look see. I'm going to the Perry Rendezvous a day early to relax and I plan on visiting the boat shop.

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BJ:

Yes, that is a PERRYWINKLE dink. It rows very well and sails well but it's not a great boat to tow unless you have the trim tab in the gudgeons to keep the stern from squatting.

I hate cute boats but it looks like I drew at least one.

 

Steele:

Thanks for the most excellant photos of the Sliver. There is no way I'm going to miss seeing that interior get lowered into the hull. I'll be at the boat next Thursday for a look see. I'm going to the Perry Rendezvous a day early to relax and I plan on visiting the boat shop.

 

We will keep your visit a secret so you can sneak up on the crew and see what they really do when they are not expecting a visit...........

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BJ:

Yes, that is a PERRYWINKLE dink. It rows very well and sails well but it's not a great boat to tow unless you have the trim tab in the gudgeons to keep the stern from squatting.

I hate cute boats but it looks like I drew at least one.

 

Steele:

Thanks for the most excellant photos of the Sliver. There is no way I'm going to miss seeing that interior get lowered into the hull. I'll be at the boat next Thursday for a look see. I'm going to the Perry Rendezvous a day early to relax and I plan on visiting the boat shop.

 

We will keep your visit a secret so you can sneak up on the crew and see what they really do when they are not expecting a visit...........

 

 

Kim,

 

We're really appreciate a time lapse of the interior being lowered into the hull.

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BJ:

Yes, that is a PERRYWINKLE dink. It rows very well and sails well but it's not a great boat to tow unless you have the trim tab in the gudgeons to keep the stern from squatting.

I hate cute boats but it looks like I drew at least one.

 

Steele:

Thanks for the most excellant photos of the Sliver. There is no way I'm going to miss seeing that interior get lowered into the hull. I'll be at the boat next Thursday for a look see. I'm going to the Perry Rendezvous a day early to relax and I plan on visiting the boat shop.

 

We will keep your visit a secret so you can sneak up on the crew and see what they really do when they are not expecting a visit...........

 

 

Kim,

 

We're really appreciate a time lapse of the interior being lowered into the hull.

 

 

The school has been doing the time lapse photograph, I will let them know that there are people all over the world hoping for one of that operation.I expect they will dry fit it a couple times before it stays in the hull.

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We're really appreciate a time lapse of the interior being lowered into the hull.

Hopefully there won't be any Hubble telescope moments, but if there are it'll be a great movie!

 

 

As Jim says, it all came from the same computer file so it should fit OK. (I bet they measure a couple times before they try....this crew appears very good at taking measurements.)

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There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that the interior will slide effortlessly and perfectly into the designated space.

I don't want to be there to "check" it. I just want to see something I have not seen before, enjoy that moment and give Jim Franken a pat on the back.

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u20..how big is the fam? We did just fine with 2 adults and 2 kids in the 11' Snark. We went everywhere in that bitch, and I could sail it as the older child.

 

We even put ice & groceries in the bow & over the centerboard trunk when necessary..:rolleyes:

 

You are kidding right? 2 adults and 2 kids in an 11, Snark.

 

Paps, sorry to be late on the replies...got a few other things besides CA going on these days.

 

I am dead serious..I did not know any different back in the day..Usually Mom had the tiller & Dad paddled. Dad usually straddled the centerboard trunk and was very gracious and swung the paddle spray over & in front of the bow to keep our rear ends dry..us kids were in between...And, we never wiped out.. :blink:

 

My upgrade plan is the PT 11 since my child is now grown and it is only me & Mrs. Bitches. I need a nice rowing boat to work off the morning hangovers when cruising! B)

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SWMBO says I MUST put hot water on the Sliver.

She is pretty low maintenance in most areas but hot water is not one of them.

 

We had a little 6 gallon 115VAC/engine heat exchanger unit on our Swede 55. It seemed to keep her pretty happy. (Never did use it on 115VAC.)

 

So when I saw a new old stock 11 gallon version for less than half new on Craigslist yesterday, I dropped everything and drove the 50 miles to the guys house.

 

It was exactly as he said it was so I bought it.

 

There is so much empty space on this vessel I know I will find a good place for it. I have several places in mind already. I thought Bob was kidding when he drew a shower pan in the head, I guess he wasn't.

 

(SWMBO smiled broadly when I brought it home last night.)

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Kimb,

 

You do take good care of her! My Admiral reminded me that neither the stove nor the water system have been upgraded to her standards; while the 3Di Sails, extended spinnaker pole, new dyneema sheets, off shore legal bow pulpit, new boom vang and dozens of other things have managed to get done.... hmmmmm.....?

 

I've been remiss: :ph34r:

 

I'm sure glad she doesn't read CA or I'd REALLY be in trouble.

 

BV

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Kimb,

 

You do take good care of her! My Admiral reminded me that neither the stove nor the water system have been upgraded to her standards; while the 3Di Sails, extended spinnaker pole, new dyneema sheets, off shore legal bow pulpit, new boom vang and dozens of other things have managed to get done.... hmmmmm.....?

 

I've been remiss: :ph34r:

 

I'm sure glad she doesn't read CA or I'd REALLY be in trouble.

 

BV

 

I have her e-mail address, I can update her...........

 

Now take back that comment that you don't like double-enders!

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Well, there goes the weight study.

Don't they make a CF water heater?

 

No, don't you remember that you asked me to add some weight aft to trim her bow back up a bit? 11 gallons + the heater should be just enough to bring her onto her designed WL...............

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Kimb,

 

You do take good care of her! My Admiral reminded me that neither the stove nor the water system have been upgraded to her standards; while the 3Di Sails, extended spinnaker pole, new dyneema sheets, off shore legal bow pulpit, new boom vang and dozens of other things have managed to get done.... hmmmmm.....?

 

I've been remiss: :ph34r:

 

I'm sure glad she doesn't read CA or I'd REALLY be in trouble.

 

BV

Two years ago I was working on boat projects, commented to my Admiral that I didn't think the heater project was going to get done, she quietly replied "yes it is"... um, OK then! So it did.

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Kimb,

 

You do take good care of her! My Admiral reminded me that neither the stove nor the water system have been upgraded to her standards; while the 3Di Sails, extended spinnaker pole, new dyneema sheets, off shore legal bow pulpit, new boom vang and dozens of other things have managed to get done.... hmmmmm.....?

 

I've been remiss: :ph34r:

 

I'm sure glad she doesn't read CA or I'd REALLY be in trouble.

 

BV

Two years ago I was working on boat projects, commented to my Admiral that I didn't think the heater project was going to get done, she quietly replied "yes it is"... um, OK then! So it did. Anchor windlass - the next year.

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Kimb,

 

You do take good care of her! My Admiral reminded me that neither the stove nor the water system have been upgraded to her standards; while the 3Di Sails, extended spinnaker pole, new dyneema sheets, off shore legal bow pulpit, new boom vang and dozens of other things have managed to get done.... hmmmmm.....?

 

I've been remiss: :ph34r:

 

I'm sure glad she doesn't read CA or I'd REALLY be in trouble.

 

BV

 

I have her e-mail address, I can update her...........

 

Now take back that comment that you don't like double-enders!

 

OK!!! I LOVE DOUBLE ENDED BOATS. You can sail either direction!

 

BV

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Kimb,

 

You do take good care of her! My Admiral reminded me that neither the stove nor the water system have been upgraded to her standards; while the 3Di Sails, extended spinnaker pole, new dyneema sheets, off shore legal bow pulpit, new boom vang and dozens of other things have managed to get done.... hmmmmm.....?

 

I've been remiss: :ph34r:

 

I'm sure glad she doesn't read CA or I'd REALLY be in trouble.

 

BV

 

I have her e-mail address, I can update her...........

 

Now take back that comment that you don't like double-enders!

 

OK!!! I LOVE DOUBLE ENDED BOATS. You can sail either direction!

 

BV

 

Good Post Beau!

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Sailglobal sent me a present that arrived today.

 

CA is such a great community!

 

Grade 6-4 Aviation Titanium!

 

VERY cool!

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kimb...Mrs. Bitches would like hot water too...now that I've recently converted the 4KSB Atomic4 to FWC, maybe I could find me a 6 or 11 gallon hot water heater. B)

 

keep up the good work...following this thread is awesome.

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SWMBO says I MUST put hot water on the Sliver.

...

 

(SWMBO smiled broadly when I brought it home last night.)

 

Good for her, and good for you. It's a hundred pounds or so of extra weight. Which is going to affect your happiness more: the slight improvement in performance from leaving it off or a big smile from SWMBO? It's really not even close.

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Water heater? I'm still living in a world that a woman won't lay down in a boat that she can't stand up in. (just as well I married short :D ) and you folks are talking water heaters for a day-sailer?

 

Oh well. back to the back of the class for me I guess. :huh:

 

Solar shower anyone?

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SWMBO says I MUST put hot water on the Sliver.

...

 

(SWMBO smiled broadly when I brought it home last night.)

 

Good for her, and good for you. It's a hundred pounds or so of extra weight. Which is going to affect your happiness more: the slight improvement in performance from leaving it off or a big smile from SWMBO? It's really not even close.

 

We can leave it empty when we want performance.....we did save some unexpected weight when Sailglobal offered to supply titanium chain plates and fore stay fittings at near SS cost. Just about offsets the weight of the empty water-heater.

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We can leave it empty when we want performance.....we did save some unexpected weight when Sailglobal offered to supply titanium chain plates and fore stay fittings at near SS cost. Just about offsets the weight of the empty water-heater.

 

 

I do this on my little tri- I'm constantly removing things and keeping a mental tally of the weight so I can transfer it to something more important to me while keeping the boat light.

 

Speaking of keeping the boat light, has anyone read Nat Stone's book "On the Water". He rowed around the eastern half of the US (start NYC, up Hudson, across lakes, down Mississippi, over to Florida and back up IC to NYC), and had a journey far greater than that. Well written and a great paean to traveling light. By the time he was coming up the IC he had begun to shed everything he didn't need- clothing, equipment, food choices, etc, and just rowed for his life. A well written story and a great lesson.

 

Sorry for the hijack, waiting for more pictures.

 

 

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Sailglobal sent me a present that arrived today.

 

CA is such a great community!

 

Grade 6-4 Aviation Titanium!

 

Yay Titanium. That is exactly what Brion Toss told me we should do come replacement time.

 

I was going to get Unobtanium instead but...

 

 

Nice!

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Just back from Harbor Freight where I purchased polishing items......for the portlites and the chainplates....I know what I will be doing this weekend....

 

There is some process you can do to titanium, I don't recall what it is, that makes it take on a slight, very subtle rainbow effect. Like I said, it's subtle but I've always found the muted suggestion of color to be really beautiful.

 

I've seen it on titanium jewelry. You might want to take a look at it.

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Just back from Harbor Freight where I purchased polishing items......for the portlites and the chainplates....I know what I will be doing this weekend....

 

There is some process you can do to titanium, I don't recall what it is, that makes it take on a slight, very subtle rainbow effect. Like I said, it's subtle but I've always found the muted suggestion of color to be really beautiful.

 

I've seen it on titanium jewelry. You might want to take a look at it.

 

I think that what you are referring to is 'flame applied patina'. It involves heating the titanium and with a torch and then sprinkling various chemical elements into the flame which vaporize in the heat of the torch flame and then are deposited on the heated titanium surface. It might be something to look into but I'm not sure it adds any extra additional corrosion resistance.

 

On further googling, it seems that titanium can be used to apply the patina to stainless steel, but titanium doesn't need any other element just the heat to create the multicolored effect mentioned here in the previous post. I found this site that gives some info on titanium anodizing using electrical heat to get the same effect as the heat but I'm not sure it would be appropriate for Sliver. Titanium naturally gets a deeper clear oxide coating with time that increases its luster and would seem to be just fine for this boat.

 

http://mrtitanium.com/anodizing.html

 

Rasp

 

PS I spent an absurd price for a titanium axle for the tailwheel of my sailplane for the weight saving and strength and have to admit I have never once looked at it to see how its wondrous patina is progressing...

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And she looks good with her fellow fleet members. Not counting my inflatable these are all of my operational vessels at this time. Looking forward to adding the Big Sliver to the mix.....

 

I think I saw you leaving EBM last Thursday (or was it 2 Thursdays ago) in the cat. We were coming in for the Downtown Series. You SYC? This boat had a burgee off the bow.

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And she looks good with her fellow fleet members. Not counting my inflatable these are all of my operational vessels at this time. Looking forward to adding the Big Sliver to the mix.....

 

I think I saw you leaving EBM last Thursday (or was it 2 Thursdays ago) in the cat. We were coming in for the Downtown Series. You SYC? This boat had a burgee off the bow.

 

sounds like me, please hail me next time, I always like meeting CA members.

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And she looks good with her fellow fleet members. Not counting my inflatable these are all of my operational vessels at this time. Looking forward to adding the Big Sliver to the mix.....

 

I think I saw you leaving EBM last Thursday (or was it 2 Thursdays ago) in the cat. We were coming in for the Downtown Series. You SYC? This boat had a burgee off the bow.

 

sounds like me, please hail me next time, I always like meeting CA members.

 

Sure thing.

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Kim:

That is a sweet skiff. Can't see how you could do any better than that.

Don't listen to Tom. That boat is happiest being rowed.

 

Hah! I was trying to echo Bolger's exasperation with people who insist on sailing paddle boats.

 

Although I admit I am occasionally one of those people.

 

faltsl.jpg

 

Bolger claims one of his designs is actually a decent sailboat, rowboat, and powerboat. I'm skeptical. I may have to build it to find out.

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Kim:

That is a sweet skiff. Can't see how you could do any better than that.

Don't listen to Tom. That boat is happiest being rowed.

 

Hah! I was trying to echo Bolger's exasperation with people who insist on sailing paddle boats.

 

Although I admit I am occasionally one of those people.

 

faltsl.jpg

 

Bolger claims one of his designs is actually a decent sailboat, rowboat, and powerboat. I'm skeptical. I may have to build it to find out.

 

 

That particular design keeps crying to me also, but it would take a lot of plywood and you still have a fugly boat.

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I think Kim needs one of those seats on a plank that the canoe sailors use. Then he could hike in comfort while sailing the little Sliver. Or maybe a Viking sail and only go down wind. :rolleyes:

 

BV

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I think Kim needs one of those seats on a plank that the canoe sailors use. Then he could hike in comfort while sailing the little Sliver. Or maybe a Viking sail and only go down wind. :rolleyes:

 

BV

 

Baby Sliver does not have much stability, no keel and no rudder so.................., I think I will row or only sail down wind.

 

I am too old and creaky for the plank!

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Monday.

 

Stringers 5 layers of the heavy eGlass. Poor old Fred was cutting and cutting and cutting.......and then rolling and rolling and rolling......Russell wasn't kidding when he said there was a heck of a lot of laminating to do on this interior.

 

Meanwhile Russell is busy getting the inside of the cabin truck prepped enough for painting....

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And the stringers have to be positioned relative to the bulkhead, which takes careful measurements to make sure everything comes out right.

 

The forward most bulkhead is angled back aft to accommodate the run of the fore-stay. Tight fit but I can get through it to the bow stem.

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The center section of the structural interior is all bonded together so now we can remove most of the jig and allow it to stand on its own which makes access to the last couple items before it get fitted to the hull easier. There will be some tight blind lamination to do once the center gets put in the hull, so Jordan has been planning how to do them carefully and adding little aids here and there...

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Bruce is trying to sell his delightful little Joel White designed Catspaw dinghy.

 

And we seem to have visitors often now at the shop, two sets of them stopped by while I was there this morning. Here is Jordan explaining the finer details of the project.

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Bolger claims one of his designs is actually a decent sailboat, rowboat, and powerboat. I'm skeptical. I may have to build it to find out.

 

That particular design keeps crying to me also, but it would take a lot of plywood and you still have a fugly boat.

 

Bolger explains at length, over and over, why multi-propulsion boats are bad. I've said similar things about the MacGregor powersailers.

 

But I still want something that will row, sail, and power. I agree it's ugly as homemade sin. That doesn't bother me a bit. I like it when other people have attractive boats, but don't really care about their viewing experience looking back at me. :P

 

Bruce is trying to sell his delightful little Joel White designed Catspaw dinghy.

 

 

Glad there is a continent between me and it.

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Of course you can get thru that hole Kim. Why do you think I designed it like that? You told me you had a 32" waist and I designed the opening accordingly.

 

My father's diet plan for his whole life: he refuses to buy new pants. If he gets fat, he can't leave the house until he remedies the situation. It has worked.

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Kim, it looks like the fwd bulkhead of the internal grid is set up for stringer cutouts, how will this happen? Will the grid be lowered in then moved fwd over the ends of the stringers?

 

Looking fantastic by the way. These guys attention to detail is amazing!

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Underside of the cockpit, not too many people will see it, but good to know the crew cares about it.

 

Kim, the boat looks great and thanks again for a complete Monday update. I had powerboating pics all lined up if you failed in your duty. ;)

 

Bob, how do you (and designers in general) decide on the depth of the gutters around hatch lids? Those look a bit shallow to me, but then, pretty much all of them do. They always seem like they could use another inch or so. I hit the seam with a hose and water manages to splash down hard enough to bounce up around the corner and land where it does not belong. I might have mentioned my belief that a boat should have no puddles and no water where it does not belong when I'm done hosing it. ;)

 

Am I the only one? Should I just HTFU as I go around with a sponge or chamois and get rid of the offending water? Or should I continue to mutter obscenities about designers? ;)

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Underside of the cockpit, not too many people will see it, but good to know the crew cares about it.

 

Kim, the boat looks great and thanks again for a complete Monday update. I had powerboating pics all lined up if you failed in your duty. ;)

 

Bob, how do you (and designers in general) decide on the depth of the gutters around hatch lids? Those look a bit shallow to me, but then, pretty much all of them do. They always seem like they could use another inch or so. I hit the seam with a hose and water manages to splash down hard enough to bounce up around the corner and land where it does not belong. I might have mentioned my belief that a boat should have no puddles and no water where it does not belong when I'm done hosing it. ;)

 

Am I the only one? Should I just HTFU as I go around with a sponge or chamois and get rid of the offending water? Or should I continue to mutter obscenities about designers? ;)

 

I'll throw in that I don't see limber holes at any of the frames or stringers. Was this a conscious decision? I'd be interested in the thoughts behind it. Assuming some water will find its way below at some point, how will you get it out?

 

Great pics and a very nice build.

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Kim, it looks like the fwd bulkhead of the internal grid is set up for stringer cutouts, how will this happen? Will the grid be lowered in then moved fwd over the ends of the stringers?

 

Looking fantastic by the way. These guys attention to detail is amazing!

 

The reinforcing plates on the forward bulkhead of the center section are not notched therefore I believe the stringer will terminate at that reinforcing plate.

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Underside of the cockpit, not too many people will see it, but good to know the crew cares about it.

 

Kim, the boat looks great and thanks again for a complete Monday update. I had powerboating pics all lined up if you failed in your duty. ;)

 

Bob, how do you (and designers in general) decide on the depth of the gutters around hatch lids? Those look a bit shallow to me, but then, pretty much all of them do. They always seem like they could use another inch or so. I hit the seam with a hose and water manages to splash down hard enough to bounce up around the corner and land where it does not belong. I might have mentioned my belief that a boat should have no puddles and no water where it does not belong when I'm done hosing it. ;)

 

Am I the only one? Should I just HTFU as I go around with a sponge or chamois and get rid of the offending water? Or should I continue to mutter obscenities about designers? ;)

 

I'll throw in that I don't see limber holes at any of the frames or stringers. Was this a conscious decision? I'd be interested in the thoughts behind it. Assuming some water will find its way below at some point, how will you get it out?

 

Great pics and a very nice build.

 

The bulkheads all have a cutout (in the reinforcing plate) over the keelson to allow for "limbering". The upper stringers have a sloped top to shed water. The forward lower stringers slope aft, the aft lower stringers slope forward to shed water towards the center. And the ends are virtually completely open so inspecting for water retention will be easy. My Dad used to sponge out his bilge after every sail (on his Dragon) so I might have to follow suit if necessary.

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Tom:

I draw what I consider a reasonable gutter depth. I don't recall my gutters ever being a problem.

 

Jim and Russell would have complained if they did not think the gutters were deep enough.

 

Nice thing about all of the crew on this build, they are always thinking of ways to improve the vessel.

 

Jordan, Fred, Bruce, Brandon, Jim, Tim, Russell are always thinking of such things.

 

Bob too.

 

I am very lucky to have these guys working on the Sliver!

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Tom:

I draw what I consider a reasonable gutter depth. I don't recall my gutters ever being a problem.

 

 

I absolutley love this thread. what a cool boat. I am curious as to what Tom Rays qualifications are. What boats has he designed or built? What boat does he own? Does he sail?

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A couple of questions for kimb or Bob or anyone else who knows the answer (this has been a long thread).

 

The area forward of the forward most bulkhead is shown on the most recent drawing I have at hand as a "Foc'sle & Chain Locker". Will there be something covering the hole in the bulkhead to keep the rode from spilling into the second compartment? Is the foc'sle/chain locker intended to drain along the limber holes along the keel to the bilge pump (wherever that is as there is no bulge sump).

 

 

Do you intend to design in a provision to block up the second bulkhead to create a waterproof bulkhead (collision bulkhead) for future offshore work? cool.gif

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Sal:

No. At this stage there is no "offshore work" in the owner's plans as you would know if you read the thread closely. This is a daysailer. Always has been. If the owner was planning on going offshore I'm not sure I would make that bulkhead watertight anyway. For now it's all about having access to the extreme ends of the boat. But given the way the SLIVER is laid out it would be easy for another owner to have WT bhds.

 

How much chain do you imagine SLIVER will carry? I can tell you now it will be very little and certainly not the 200' that "real cruisers" think is required for "safe" anchoring. I think Kim will have 20' to 25' of chain and the rest rode and that will fit nicely in the focsle area if that's where he chooses to carry it.

 

Monster;

I don't care what Tom's qualifications are. His posts on design issues are cogent and speak of years messing around in boats. Weren't you supposed to put, "and I don't mean to offend" somewhere in your post?

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I am curious as to what Tom Rays qualifications are. What boats has he designed or built? What boat does he own? Does he sail?

 

Mash,

 

Like all of us (more or less), Tom has the qualifications to ask questions when something interests him. Me, I usually watch for the answers. Search for "Cowmarran" for boats he has built. We know he does sail and pedal a Hobie Adventure Island IIRC, and is an avid cat boat sailor. I too have had water creep under my hatchs when spraying with a hose. Haven't you?

 

Edit: Tom is probably offended that I answered in his place. Didn't mean to offend, Tom.

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