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Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor


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OK, Bob, it's not overbuilt... It's just a Lot Stronger looking than the foam and carbon POS that I've sailed on recently. That said, the POS I was on couldn't hold jib stay tension. We were lifting the ends of the boat up. So much for engineering.

 

BV

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I don't think it's "overbuilt". We have used a very clever and creative engineer, Tim Nolan. Tim has factored in that this is a very long and skinny boat that can have some severe bending moments on the hull....

 

That makes me wonder: how much will it bend?

 

Beau mentions pulling a boat into a U trying to get forestay tension. The problem with forestays is that only an infinitely tight wire is really straight.

 

They all sag a little, and when you tug really hard on the Sliver's ends, it will bend the boat at least a little, right? Do you know how much?

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Tom,

 

I don't think that Sliver will bend much at all. Also, in addition to the bend from rig tension, which seems pretty static.... imagine the torque when you're going up wind and heeled 40 degrees. Then you drop off the windward side of a wave and the keel hits the water to side of the hull a couple of feet and then the hull slams down. That must try to twist the heck out of a hull. This one looks very strong.

 

BV

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Tom:

I suspect Tim could come up with a "how much bend" number. Not sure I'd belive it though. There are som many elements to the structure that will add longitudinal stiffness. I think with the entire structure inj the computer an FEA approach would yield some almost reliable numbers. I predict that will will not seee any longtudinal bening due to headstay/backstay loads on SLIVER. It will be there. But we won't notice it.

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Tom:

I suspect Tim could come up with a "how much bend" number. Not sure I'd belive it though. There are som many elements to the structure that will add longitudinal stiffness. I think with the entire structure inj the computer an FEA approach would yield some almost reliable numbers. I predict that will will not seee any longtudinal bening due to headstay/backstay loads on SLIVER. It will be there. But we won't notice it.

 

All that plus with the head stay well back from the stem I doubt we will notice any deflection from head stay tension. The box structure already looks stiff as hell even without the deck.

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So it is Monday and I visited the project.

 

First some general pictures for an overall view of the boat.

 

However, pictures do not really do her justice, she looks GREAT!

 

The craftsmanship continues to be first rate and I am very happy with our crew.

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We were fortunate to hire two of the outstanding students from the recent graduating contemporary class Cooper and Kai to join Jordan (the top graduate from the previous class), Fred (Boat School graduate from several years ago) and Bruce the contemporary instructor.

 

The incoming contemporary class will join the project in January as we make our dash to get into the water.

 

Meanwhile our now five man crew is charging ahead making good progress.

 

Kai and Cooper were busy today trimming the tabbing they did last week over the hull to deck shelf and adding more tabbing to the shelf. They also were busy cleaning up some of the tabbing of the interior structure which is now finished tabbing, a big job now behind us, but with plenty more tabbing to go with the deck installation.

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Meanwhile Fred (who is a meticulous craftsman) tackled the SS mast step floor. It had to be just right of course and using a laser level Fred dialed it in under the watchful eye of Jim Franken our general all around build expert and computer file master.

 

Once they were happy with the location and fit Fred started the task of drilling the bolt holes into the G-10 solid girder so the stress of the mast will be distributed through the interior structure and will not point load the hull. Drilling G-10 is no easy task!

 

(In the fourth picture you can just make out the red laser level mark showing the reference mark.)

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While all of this activity was taking place, Jim, Bruce and I messed around with various interior details such as exact water tank location and did some planning for the plumbing and such...

 

Details like what sink to install in the galley, what muffler system to use for the Yanmar, where to exit the exhaust, how to reinforce the rudder tube, how to construct the lift outs in the salon berths, where to put the batteries, where to put the battery switch, the electrical panel, water heater, cabin sole, cook top.......

 

For a simple boat there sure are a bunch of details, makes me cringe to think what ND is going to face down the road on his much more complex vessel fortunately he is younger than me, so I know he is up to the task.

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"Yes dear, the boat is safe for the kid's, I know the fella's who built it would not go near it without a face mask But trust me the boat IS kiddy-safe" :lol:

 

Kidding.

 

Looks real nice but please tell me that that mast step is going to have a visit to the bead blasters before being installed.

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...

Kai and Cooper were busy today trimming the tabbing they did last week over the hull to deck shelf...

 

With a heat gun and razor knife?

 

That's new to me.

 

Assuming that tabbing has cured, I would have picked up some kind of power tool to trim the edge off.

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...

Kai and Cooper were busy today trimming the tabbing they did last week over the hull to deck shelf...

 

With a heat gun and razor knife?

 

That's new to me.

 

Assuming that tabbing has cured, I would have picked up some kind of power tool to trim the edge off.

 

Cooper showed me the difference between with heat and without, it was rather dramatic. The heat softened it enough that the razor just sliced right through like butter. Without heat it was tough. Faster than setting up the power tools. He was done with the entire starboard side in just a few minutes. It would have taken that long to find and install the cutting blades on the power tool.

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Kim,

 

I now refer to the Sliver as the best-built boat I've ever seen, and have sent a number of folks who "think" they are boat builders here to see how it should really be done. The team is just amazing!!

 

Beau

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Kim,

 

I now refer to the Sliver as the best-built boat I've ever seen, and have sent a number of folks who "think" they are boat builders here to see how it should really be done. The team is just amazing!!

 

Beau

 

You are too kind Beau, but I did forward your comments to the team so they will feel appreciated!

 

(Admittedly I am quite happy with the project.)

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Thanks for all the pictures- between this and the Dart thread I'm learning a lot about composite boatbuilding.

 

My finger slipped and I wrote boastbuilding- which is what you all are doing. Mighty fine.

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...

Kai and Cooper were busy today trimming the tabbing they did last week over the hull to deck shelf...

 

With a heat gun and razor knife?

 

That's new to me.

 

Assuming that tabbing has cured, I would have picked up some kind of power tool to trim the edge off.

 

Cooper showed me the difference between with heat and without, it was rather dramatic. The heat softened it enough that the razor just sliced right through like butter. Without heat it was tough. Faster than setting up the power tools. He was done with the entire starboard side in just a few minutes. It would have taken that long to find and install the cutting blades on the power tool.

 

Interesting. I can see how that would be very fast and neat, not to mention dust-free. I've waited until stuff was almost cured, about as hard as an overcooked pork chop, then sliced it off to avoid later grinding. Worked great.

 

But you have to heat parts that are staying on the boat. I'd be worried that it might affect the strength or bonding of the part left behind. I guess those guys know it doesn't?

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I

...

Kai and Cooper were busy today trimming the tabbing they did last week over the hull to deck shelf...

 

With a heat gun and razor knife?

 

That's new to me.

 

Assuming that tabbing has cured, I would have picked up some kind of power tool to trim the edge off.

 

Cooper showed me the difference between with heat and without, it was rather dramatic. The heat softened it enough that the razor just sliced right through like butter. Without heat it was tough. Faster than setting up the power tools. He was done with the entire starboard side in just a few minutes. It would have taken that long to find and install the cutting blades on the power tool.

 

Interesting. I can see how that would be very fast and neat, not to mention dust-free. I've waited until stuff was almost cured, about as hard as an overcooked pork chop, then sliced it off to avoid later grinding. Worked great.

 

But you have to heat parts that are staying on the boat. I'd be worried that it might affect the strength or bonding of the part left behind. I guess those guys know it doesn't?

 

I wouldn't be surprised if a bit of heat actually improved the cure.

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...

Kai and Cooper were busy today trimming the tabbing they did last week over the hull to deck shelf...

 

With a heat gun and razor knife?

 

That's new to me.

 

Assuming that tabbing has cured, I would have picked up some kind of power tool to trim the edge off.

 

Cooper showed me the difference between with heat and without, it was rather dramatic. The heat softened it enough that the razor just sliced right through like butter. Without heat it was tough. Faster than setting up the power tools. He was done with the entire starboard side in just a few minutes. It would have taken that long to find and install the cutting blades on the power tool.

 

Interesting. I can see how that would be very fast and neat, not to mention dust-free. I've waited until stuff was almost cured, about as hard as an overcooked pork chop, then sliced it off to avoid later grinding. Worked great.

 

But you have to heat parts that are staying on the boat. I'd be worried that it might affect the strength or bonding of the part left behind. I guess those guys know it doesn't?

 

You could always go over to Fix It Anarchy and ask Vegas. Nothing like getting it from the source, literally.

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...

Kai and Cooper were busy today trimming the tabbing they did last week over the hull to deck shelf...

 

With a heat gun and razor knife?

 

That's new to me.

 

Assuming that tabbing has cured, I would have picked up some kind of power tool to trim the edge off.

 

Cooper showed me the difference between with heat and without, it was rather dramatic. The heat softened it enough that the razor just sliced right through like butter. Without heat it was tough. Faster than setting up the power tools. He was done with the entire starboard side in just a few minutes. It would have taken that long to find and install the cutting blades on the power tool.

 

Interesting. I can see how that would be very fast and neat, not to mention dust-free. I've waited until stuff was almost cured, about as hard as an overcooked pork chop, then sliced it off to avoid later grinding. Worked great.

 

But you have to heat parts that are staying on the boat. I'd be worried that it might affect the strength or bonding of the part left behind. I guess those guys know it doesn't?

 

You could always go over to Fix It Anarchy and ask Vegas. Nothing like getting it from the source, literally.

 

Looks like he did.

 

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=141009

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...

Kai and Cooper were busy today trimming the tabbing they did last week over the hull to deck shelf...

 

With a heat gun and razor knife?

 

That's new to me.

 

Assuming that tabbing has cured, I would have picked up some kind of power tool to trim the edge off.

 

If you use epoxy and get it while it is still green, a sharp chisel does a nice neat job.

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I am sure the boat will be plenty strong, Kim (dad) and I spent a little quality time together in the North Pacific one very dark night when it was blowing 70+. He has also seen me drive.

 

With a hull speed well over the 8.3knts needed I hope 200 mile days are not a big effort. I personally have logged many days over 250 nm in the open ocean.

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I am sure the boat will be plenty strong, Kim (dad) and I spent a little quality time together in the North Pacific one very dark night when it was blowing 70+. He has also seen me drive.

 

With a hull speed well over the 8.3knts needed I hope 200 mile days are not a big effort. I personally have logged many days over 250 nm in the open ocean.

 

I will never forget that night. Most scared I have ever been in life. 70 knots is a hell of a lot of wind!

 

Let's hope we don't see that on the Sliver, however I bet she could handle it, I just don't want to see her do it.

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Sitting here trying to imagine sailing in the ocean in 70 knots of wind.

 

Luckily, nothing in my experience really lets me even imagine what that is like. Ignorance is bliss.

 

Yep. Outside of squalls where the fetch had no time to build, the only time I've had more than 50 knots, I was "sailing" the USS Nimitz.. No substitute for displacement and armored steel in those conditions.

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Sitting here trying to imagine sailing in the ocean in 70 knots of wind.

 

Luckily, nothing in my experience really lets me even imagine what that is like. Ignorance is bliss.

 

Yep. Outside of squalls where the fetch had no time to build, the only time I've had more than 50 knots, I was "sailing" the USS Nimitz.. No substitute for displacement and armored steel in those conditions.

 

We were on the mighty Atalanta at the time, 120,000 pounds of very strong aluminum construction. She just shrugged it off and kept charging along on a broad reach. I was hanging on for dear life. I do not want to ever see those conditions again!

 

When we got to port someone asked one of our crew if it was cold on the passage (it was Feb) his reply: " I was so scared I forgot to notice if it was cold!" (Interestingly he is now a part owner of the mighty Atalanta.)

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How far offshore and the distance between waves and what sail combo?

 

We were about 100 miles off Oregon heading north.

Big ketch rig with only the double reefed main up.

We should have had the main down and the small jib and reefed mizzen up, (if there is ever a "next time" that is what I will do if on a ketch.)

We discussed putting the third reef in the main, but no one wanted to go forward and do it and the boat didn't care she was just charging happily along, we averaged 16 knots for about 4 hours at one point.

I saw 20 knots on the Brook and Gatehouse a number of times charging down waves.

We did Golden Gate bridge to Neah Bay, WA in four days flat (4PM to 4PM).

75 foot boat with about 70 foot LWL. I love that vessel, she might not be the best looking boat but she sure was strong!

The waves were about 20-25 feet but they were a reasonable distance apart so we only took solid water into the cockpit a couple times.

First time a wave came on board I was washed to the end of my tether. I learned to hold on better after that.

Coming off watch we would throw our clothes into the dryer. We ran the generator the entire trip so we were warm and toasty below.

The paid cook was on board so we ate well as she could cook in any conditions.

 

That's "dbottles" in the red foulies in front of the mainmast looking up at the chute.

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Nice pic! .....hey wait....

 

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2006 RTC, I was on the Tripp 47 and saw Atalanta charging our way.

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My meager pics still don't do justice to the moment in time......it was AWESOME!

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now back to the Sliver thread >end hi-jack<

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Atalanta is one hell of a boat!

 

I loved sailing on her, but we usually had 22-26 bodies for crew.

 

I once had lunch with a guy and we discovered we had both sailed in the same races on her and we had never met because he was in the foredeck crew and I was in the after guard.

 

That is too many in the crew for my taste (.....here comes the Sliver link.....) that's why we designed the Sliver around a very small crew. I bet we can racer her with 4 or 5.

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Ish:

Oh yeah, I forgot about that.

We'll have 6 of them on the line next summer.

I've got to start dreaming bigger.

 

Last night I dreamed I was in Albania at a college at the school for music. I was staying with a local family, with a tall, blond, good looking wife and they took me to tour the college.

I ran into George Bush in the cafeteria. Actually he recognized me first. " Bob!" "George!" I was really happy to see him. Politics aside I bet he would be fun to share a cafeteria meal with.

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It's a one-design class, isn't it?

We don't need no steenking lifelines.

 

Yes, the Perry Sliver 95 Square Metre Class.

 

The "Francis Lee" is sail number USA 1

 

I have already registered her with the Seattle Yacht Club as such.

 

I spent the afternoon at Fisheries Supply looking at galley sinks, head sinks, cook tops, winches, deck hardware, coolers, etc.

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I spent the afternoon at Fisheries Supply looking at galley sinks, head sinks, cook tops, winches, deck hardware, coolers, etc.

Never understand why galley sinks don't have V shaped bottoms, so that they drain at any angle of heel, and you need less water to get some depth for washing up.

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I spent the afternoon at Fisheries Supply looking at galley sinks, head sinks, cook tops, winches, deck hardware, coolers, etc.

Never understand why galley sinks don't have V shaped bottoms, so that they drain at any angle of heel, and you need less water to get some depth for washing up.

 

I think these sinks are actually bar sinks that they label as "marine" and jack up the price.

 

In any event the sink selection is all up to SWMBO.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well, OK. I guess I had better report on the long day I had at the project today.

 

We are into details at this point, lots and lots of details. I thought this was to be a simple vessel and it is, however I am getting buried in questions from Bruce and Jim.

 

This is the most fun I have had on the project. SWMBO and I have been discussing her wishes and so far no conflicts, fortunately she understands the design premise of "simple".

 

Where do I start? How about hold downs......lots of stuff has to be attached to the boat so they stay put, so the crew has been making various hold downs...and also "cradles" for the items that don't happen to be shaped to fit against the inside hull curvature (which is just about everything....)

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Battery platforms.

 

Gel Cell batteries so don't need boxes, but of course they don't conform to the hull shape so we have to build platforms.

 

We did find some nice spots in the engine room and after messing around with our cardboard cutout size 8D model (the actually batteries were way too heavy to move around) we are happy with their location on either side of the engine. The 8D's go forward and the 4D's are just aft of the 8's.

 

We have two 8D batteries for main vessel juice and two 4D batteries dedicated to the one electric winch I plan to install on the bridge deck between the two cockpits where I can reach it from the helm. I had these batteries already before we started the project so I figure I might as well use them.

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Chain Plates.

 

"Sailglobal" managed to supply the project with some very nice titanium chainplates and now we are fitting them at an angle so they match up with the angle of the lowers.

 

We tend to mock up anything that is not completely straightforward, so here is Bruce messing around with the fit.

 

The wedges will be made from G-10.

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Wallas Furnace and Verna-Lift muffler.....we are going with a north-sea exhaust with the two outlets hidden in the boot top stripe. The exhaust "tee" will be center-line forward of the bridge-deck bulkhead and then drop down each side to just above the static waterline. Nice, clean and neat.

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Avocado guacamole? That's for wussies.

 

Shit, I'll put my liverwurst guacamole up against that any day.

 

Bring some when you visit next, the crew will appreciate it!

 

Isn't it about time for a Bob Perry sighting at the project???

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Kim:

Yes, I think it's time for me to show up again and stand there Like I really know what is actually going on. They always like that, "Who's the old guy with the unruly dog?"

Maybe I'll bring chalk with me this time and make undecipherable notes all over the interior.

Things like, "Shim to fit." "Bond in a positive manner." " I need to check the Reynolds Number." "King Tut slept here."

 

Or maybe I should just walk around in silence, sucking on my pipe making them wonder what I am really thinking. That always works. I won't let them know that I am thinking about naked women.

 

I'll be sure to bring the liverwurst guacamole. Ruby loves it.

 

Just pick the day but remember we have to get Bruce Hedrick up there too.

But a bird told me that you were going to be at the shack on Saturday. We can discuss it then.

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Kim:

Yes, I think it's time for me to show up again and stand there Like I really knoiw what is actually going on. They always like that, "Who's the old guy with the unruly dog?"

Maybe I'll bring chalk with me this time and make undecipherable notes all over the interior.

Things like, "Shim to fit." "Bond in a positive manner." " I need to check the Reynolds Number." "King Tut slept here."

 

Or maybe I should just walk around in silence, sucking on my pipe making them wonder what I am really thinking. That always works.

 

I'll be sure to bring the liverwurst guacamole. Ruby loves it.

 

Just pick the day but remember we have to get Bruce Hedrick up there too.

But a bird told me that you were going to be at the shack on Saturday. We can discuss it then.

 

Believe the bird.

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Kimb,

 

I want to know more about the exhaust for the heater. My heater doesn't work worth S**t on a windy stb tack as the exhaust is underwater - cuz the entire port rail is under water and the pipe is a few inches below the port rail. So, the idea of a vent on each side etc.... per what you said is very interesting. While I can live without heat on a long stb tack in heavy weather, I CAN NOT LIVE WITHOUT HOT FOOD AND COFFEE.... sorry to get "expressive".

 

BV

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Kim,

 

one of the problems with Eclipse's chainplates was that you couldn't lift the little coverplates far enough to recaulk the chainplate seams. The turnbuckle yokes were low to the deck and stopped them being lifted far enough . Of course probably not a problem for a decade but annoying when they eventually needed doing.

 

I would suggest they be made in two pieces or manufacture the chainplates to rise above the deck far enough that you can lift the cover plates, if they are one piece.

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Kimb,

 

I want to know more about the exhaust for the heater. My heater doesn't work worth S**t on a windy stb tack as the exhaust is underwater - cuz the entire port rail is under water and the pipe is a few inches below the port rail. So, the idea of a vent on each side etc.... per what you said is very interesting. While I can live without heat on a long stb tack in heavy weather, I CAN NOT LIVE WITHOUT HOT FOOD AND COFFEE.... sorry to get "expressive".

 

BV

 

The dual north sea exhaust is on the engine.

 

I am afraid we will have the same issue as you on the furnace as its exhaust will only exit on port side.

 

However the furnace is really only for SWMBO while at anchor.

 

Kim,

 

one of the problems with Eclipse's chainplates was that you couldn't lift the little coverplates far enough to recaulk the chainplate seams. The turnbuckle yokes were low to the deck and stopped them being lifted far enough . Of course probably not a problem for a decade but annoying when they eventually needed doing.

 

I would suggest they be made in two pieces or manufacture the chainplates to rise above the deck far enough that you can lift the cover plates, if they are one piece.

 

Good suggestion, thanks.

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We're getting close to replacing chainplates, thanks for the tip! We are currently living without covers on some chainplates since the yoke is so close to the deck, tough to keep them sealed. Derecktor did a few odd things to the boat.

 

Kim,

 

one of the problems with Eclipse's chainplates was that you couldn't lift the little coverplates far enough to recaulk the chainplate seams. The turnbuckle yokes were low to the deck and stopped them being lifted far enough . Of course probably not a problem for a decade but annoying when they eventually needed doing.

 

I would suggest they be made in two pieces or manufacture the chainplates to rise above the deck far enough that you can lift the cover plates, if they are one piece.

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Kim,

 

one of the problems with Eclipse's chainplates was that you couldn't lift the little coverplates far enough to recaulk the chainplate seams. The turnbuckle yokes were low to the deck and stopped them being lifted far enough . Of course probably not a problem for a decade but annoying when they eventually needed doing.

 

I would suggest they be made in two pieces or manufacture the chainplates to rise above the deck far enough that you can lift the cover plates, if they are one piece.

 

I had this exact problem on Brigadoon last spring, when i was chasing down some chain plate leaks. It was a serious pain in the ass, and the knees, and the back, not to mention my wrists and elbows. :)

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Or maybe I should just walk around in silence, sucking on my pipe making them wonder what I am really thinking. That always works. I won't let them know that I am thinking about naked women.

 

That would be the most evil.

 

"Would you go over and find out why Bob keeps staring at me? It's driving me nuts!"

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Kim:

Yes, I think it's time for me to show up again and stand there Like I really knoiw what is actually going on. They always like that, "Who's the old guy with the unruly dog?"

Maybe I'll bring chalk with me this time and make undecipherable notes all over the interior.

Things like, "Shim to fit." "Bond in a positive manner." " I need to check the Reynolds Number." "King Tut slept here."

 

Or maybe I should just walk around in silence, sucking on my pipe making them wonder what I am really thinking. That always works.

 

I'll be sure to bring the liverwurst guacamole. Ruby loves it.

 

Just pick the day but remember we have to get Bruce Hedrick up there too.

But a bird told me that you were going to be at the shack on Saturday. We can discuss it then.

 

Believe the bird.

 

Let us know what day you plan on going up.

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Kim:

Yes, I think it's time for me to show up again and stand there Like I really knoiw what is actually going on. They always like that, "Who's the old guy with the unruly dog?"

Maybe I'll bring chalk with me this time and make undecipherable notes all over the interior.

Things like, "Shim to fit." "Bond in a positive manner." " I need to check the Reynolds Number." "King Tut slept here."

 

Or maybe I should just walk around in silence, sucking on my pipe making them wonder what I am really thinking. That always works.

 

I'll be sure to bring the liverwurst guacamole. Ruby loves it.

 

Just pick the day but remember we have to get Bruce Hedrick up there too.

But a bird told me that you were going to be at the shack on Saturday. We can discuss it then.

 

Believe the bird.

 

Let us know what day you plan on going up.

 

It would be great to have you show up too Boomer!

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Thank you! Would like to see it very much, both the boat and the school. Used to stop by the school a couple times a year, back when they were on the outskirts of Port Townsend. Also stopped by their new Hadlock location a year or so after their move, twice. Quite some time ago,visiting my brother up there he pointed out the new shop under construction when it was first going up, on one of our drives down to the Port. Though I used to go up there regularly when we had work on the Navy's docks or changing out their mooring buoys, it's been a long time since I've been down to check out the facilities.

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Will have to bring a few variations of homemade salsa from medium to nuclear, and some bean dip.

 

If it's a bit nippy out a crock pot of black bean soup or a hot chilli and perhaps a stuffed pork roast.

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I spent a good part of the afternoon with Bob and WHL at the beach shack and we decided that we will have a traveler after-all on the Sliver.

 

I kept thinking that the simple nature of this project warranted no traveler, but after we chatted a bit it became clear we needed a traveler.

 

When we went downstairs for lunch SWMBO was very pleased as she likes me to "travel down" whenever we heel beyond 20 degrees. (She has been known to say it with some gusto on certain occasions in the puffs.)

 

WHL had all sorts of good ideas for the Sliver project. Pretty handy guy to know.

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Hmmm... An automated wife-friendly traveler, perhaps? If the boat heels past 20, it releases the uphill side automagically.

 

If your wife feels that way about heeling, why does the Sliver have only one hull?

 

Maybe I am a traditionalist......

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Wives complaining about heeling is certainly a sailing tradition. ;)

 

I think it goes beyond tradition. Within limits, a boat heeling over as some wind hits is part of the feeling of acceleration that I like. The multihull acceleration experience is different, missing an element of "hang on, here we go!"

 

I wonder why the multihull sailboat market has no real equivalent to the "pretty daysailor" category of monohulls? Is it because there is no way for them to avoid looking funny?

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Wives complaining about heeling is certainly a sailing tradition. ;)/>

 

I think it goes beyond tradition. Within limits, a boat heeling over as some wind hits is part of the feeling of acceleration that I like. The multihull acceleration experience is different, missing an element of "hang on, here we go!"

 

I wonder why the multihull sailboat market has no real equivalent to the "pretty daysailor" category of monohulls? Is it because there is no way for them to avoid looking funny?

 

We are a multihull powerboat family having had several power cats including our present Glacier Bay, but in as much as the Sliver project is in memory of my dear old departed dad (and Spike) it HAD to be a double-ender and a monohull.

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Wives complaining about heeling is certainly a sailing tradition. ;)/>

 

I think it goes beyond tradition. Within limits, a boat heeling over as some wind hits is part of the feeling of acceleration that I like. The multihull acceleration experience is different, missing an element of "hang on, here we go!"

 

We are a multihull powerboat family having had several power cats including our present Glacier Bay, but in as much as the Sliver project is in memory of my dear old departed dad (and Spike) it HAD to be a double-ender and a monohull.

 

Ann doesn't like sailing, but she prefers monohulls. Has never minded heeling, but sailing to weather in anything but very calm weather she hates. No fear, just great displeasure with the motion.

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Wives complaining about heeling is certainly a sailing tradition. ;)

 

Depends on the wife...

 

Also have found that women who get queasy under power in a sailboat, were a lot happier under sail and not having to deal with the motion sickness.

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