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kdh,

 

this is a sailing forum, not a brag about your wealth forum which you constantly try to do. it comes off as quite insecure and not impressive at all. hey guys look at me, im so rich!!!!!!!

 

Deleted. I try very hard not to do that. I apologize.

 

No need to apologise KD, I got the tongue in your cheek as usual.

 

 

Olaf:

We are just doing what we think needs to be done. What we think is "fun".

Sailors talking to sailors.

 

If a couple of wankers have a problem with it, then I am sorry. They can wank off somewhere else.

 

For Kim. ND, Boomer. BV, kdh and Adele, Mungster, Hungster, Ishy, Boomster, Rasper, Gate ( my dear buddy) and me, Maestro ( I really like that) Sons, Oregon, Austin ( love that steer), Greevs IB, once again IB, Anom ( with Scout and always loved at the shack), Jackdaw, Amatii, and the mighty AJAX, Ajax we are with you every prescious step. All of us learning. I can't remember what I was going to say. But is was important .

 

Gee, one bad comment and you get dropped?

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I hate to interrupt all of the various hijacks here but I visited the project today to see how it was all coming along and found Bruce down under the starboard galley shelves finishing up the lamination of the last stringers that were necessitated by my desire to be able to lift all of the cabin sole up for inspection and cleaning. The Port stringers were finished and looking very sturdy. Cooper was preparing the laminates and handing them up to Bruce who was applying them. It proves that Bruce is a working leader and not just some guy with a clipboard. We are pretty proud of Bruce, he had done a great job leading this project and has retained his excellent sense of humor while doing it.

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Hooray for removable floor panels and maintenance access in general!

 

 

 

...

For Kim. ND, Boomer. BV, kdh and Adele, Mungster, Hungster, Ishy, Boomster, Rasper, Gate ( my dear buddy) and me, Maestro ( I really like that) Sons, Oregon, Austin ( love that steer), Greevs IB, once again IB, Anom ( with Scout and always loved at the shack), Jackdaw, Amatii, and the mighty AJAX, Ajax we are with you every prescious step. All of us learning. I can't remember what I was going to say. But is was important .

 

Gee, one bad comment and you get dropped?

 

Maybe we're just on a time out, Paps. ;)

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I hate to interrupt all of the various hijacks here but I visited the project today to see how it was all coming along and found Bruce down under the starboard galley shelves finishing up the lamination of the last stringers that were necessitated by my desire to be able to lift all of the cabin sole up for inspection and cleaning. The Port stringers were finished and looking very sturdy. Cooper was preparing the laminates and handing them up to Bruce who was applying them. It proves that Bruce is a working leader and not just some guy with a clipboard. We are pretty proud of Bruce, he had done a great job leading this project and has retained his excellent sense of humor while doing it.

 

I find it amusing somehow that he's doing this with the deck hanging over his head, waiting...

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I know very little about the school outside of what this thread has taught me, being from the opposite side of the country. But I can't help wondering - what's next for this crew? How does one top being involved in a build of a one-off boat owned by a very classy guy, designed by a world-class designer, and surrounded by VERY skilled craftsmen every day?

 

No offense intended to the school, I have NO clue what they typically build - but this has to be a very special build for them.

 

I guess if your passion is building boats, there will always be cool stuff involved in each build. But my short-attention-span, instant-gratification-seeking ass would be impatient for another project with even half the ingredients this one has. My guess is, a guy could spend a career waiting...

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No doubt this is probably the largest high tech contemporary build to date.

 

The school has a long list of craft they've built over the years and will continue to build both contemporary and traditional craft.

 

http://www.nwboatschool.org/about/

 

And the material formerly known as the deck mold was used to add shelves to Russell's shop.

 

Good to see Russell put them to use!

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No doubt this is probably the largest high tech contemporary build to date.

 

The school has a long list of craft they've built over the years and will continue to build both contemporary and traditional craft.

 

http://www.nwboatschool.org/about/

 

And the material formerly known as the deck mold was used to add shelves to Russell's shop.

 

Good to see Russell put them to use!

 

The school has built more than 100 vessels over the years of all sizes.

 

We are trying to avoid just throwing stuff away so we actively look for ways to recycle materials we are finished using. We were delighted to have Russell use lots of the deck mold.

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And the material formerly known as the deck mold was used to add shelves to Russell's shop.

 

Great job on the shelf supports for the particle board; I made the mistake of using "conventional" ones 4' o.c. and ended up with "the wave" - live and learn.

 

Now where can you find those vertical grain 2x4s?

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But I can't help wondering - what's next for this crew? How does one top being involved in a build of a one-off boat owned by a very classy guy, designed by a world-class designer, and surrounded by VERY skilled craftsmen every day?

 

Good questions! I ask myself these same at least a few times a week.

 

I am forever grateful to Kim / the school / Bruce / fate(?) that I have had the opportunity to work on this project. I had been thinking of attending the school for several years, and when i finally did decide to make the move I was part of the class that started "Sliver". There were some delays in starting (the building wasn't finished) so I was afraid I wasn't going to have much to do with the build besides the initial stages that took place while I was a student...Needless to say I was blown away when Bruce offered me a job working on Sliver right after I graduated. It took away a lot of anxiety about job-searching, and it was literally a Once-In-A-Lifetime chance: I wasn't about to wait around for another one.

 

 

 

“Both destiny's kisses and its dope-slaps illustrate an individual person's basic personal powerlessness over the really meaningful events in his life: i.e. almost nothing important that ever happens to you happens because you engineer it. Destiny has no beeper; destiny always leans trenchcoated out of an alley with some sort of Psst that you usually can't even hear because you're in such a rush to or from something important you've tried to engineer.”

 

-David Foster Wallace

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GreatDane28 (Jordan) stood out as a student because of his very positive attitude, his skill level and his energy level. So when Bruce asked me if he could hire him after graduation it was an easy decision.

 

Same for Cooper and Kai later on.

 

They all made their own luck in getting on the project because of their attitude and productivity.

 

A positive attitude goes a long way in most places and most circumstances in the world.

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But I can't help wondering - what's next for this crew?

 

There is the strong possibility of a new cold molded hull for a 1930's 70 foot Sparkman & Stevens yawl to be built in the Port Townsend area maybe starting next year. We are hoping that project will offer future employment for our crew.

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But I can't help wondering - what's next for this crew?

 

There is the strong possibility of a new cold molded hull for a 1930's 70 foot Sparkman & Stevens yawl to be built in the Port Townsend area maybe starting next year. We are hoping that project will offer future employment for our crew.

 

Let me take a guess. 'Baruna'? That would be a wonderful project! Keep us posted, I just might have to enroll.

 

Rasp

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But I can't help wondering - what's next for this crew?

 

There is the strong possibility of a new cold molded hull for a 1930's 70 foot Sparkman & Stevens yawl to be built in the Port Townsend area maybe starting next year. We are hoping that project will offer future employment for our crew.

 

Let me take a guess. 'Baruna'? That would be a wonderful project! Keep us posted, I just might have to enroll.

 

Rasp

 

I don't think it is Baruna, I will ask. I do know she is owned by a German fellow and he wants to restore her to her former glory and a new hull seemed like the best way forward.

 

Here is the keel from the vessel in question, (I think Baruna is still intact.)

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I think Baruna ended up going to OCC but they may have sold her. I had a high school classmate whose Dad was the owner of Baruna. I found a nice blog page with the scoop on Baruna.

 

http://talesofawelllivedlife.blogspot.com/2009/10/baruna-plus-orient-equalsbarient.html

 

I had heard the story of the origin of 'Barient' firsthand from the son.

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Baruna,sweet. I remember her sailing down in SF bay back in the 60s. She and Orient blasting down the city front was really something to see. I think that Barient winch co. was named after a combination of those two boat names. Don't know the whole story. Anybody know more? Beau?

 

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Baruna,sweet. I remember her sailing down in SF bay back in the 60s. She and Orient blasting down the city front was really something to see. I think that Barient winch co. was named after a combination of those two boat names. Don't know the whole story. Anybody know more? Beau?

 

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I think that picture is "Bolero", "Baruna" had her house a bit more forward and I think a bit higher.

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It's a shame to paint over that beautiful bonding work. It's neat and clean and symetyrical and it has a great look to it.

 

I noticed that too...it means nothing in the bigger scheme, but it screams CRAFTSMANSHIP!!!

 

I'm very impressed.

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It's a shame to paint over that beautiful bonding work. It's neat and clean and symetyrical and it has a great look to it.

 

I noticed that too...it means nothing in the bigger scheme, but it screams CRAFTSMANSHIP!!!

 

I'm very impressed.

 

Bob and I considered leaving it unpainted so the workmanship would be seen, but Bruce nixed that idea, he is very vested in how the finished product looks.

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It's a shame to paint over that beautiful bonding work. It's neat and clean and symetyrical and it has a great look to it.

 

I noticed that too...it means nothing in the bigger scheme, but it screams CRAFTSMANSHIP!!!

 

I'm very impressed.

 

Bob and I considered leaving it unpainted so the workmanship would be seen, but Bruce nixed that idea, he is very vested in how the finished product looks.

 

Maybe leave one small unpainted patch hidden somewhere so you can show people the level of craftsmanship involved. I'd hate to cover it all up.

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It's a shame to paint over that beautiful bonding work. It's neat and clean and symetyrical and it has a great look to it.

 

I noticed that too...it means nothing in the bigger scheme, but it screams CRAFTSMANSHIP!!!

 

I'm very impressed.

 

Bob and I considered leaving it unpainted so the workmanship would be seen, but Bruce nixed that idea, he is very vested in how the finished product looks.

 

It is a shame. But I think the care in the build will show through the paint.

 

Kim, I've been following the thread since the beginning, but can't recall. I remember your wanting to be flexible with the interior and even with conveniences as she's meant principally for daysailng, but I wonder what your current thoughts are for weekending. If I remember correctly there will be a toilet and hot water. Galley? Inside shower? Berths seem easy to add.

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It's a shame to paint over that beautiful bonding work. It's neat and clean and symetyrical and it has a great look to it.

 

I noticed that too...it means nothing in the bigger scheme, but it screams CRAFTSMANSHIP!!!

 

I'm very impressed.

 

Bob and I considered leaving it unpainted so the workmanship would be seen, but Bruce nixed that idea, he is very vested in how the finished product looks.

 

It is a shame. But I think the care in the build will show through the paint.

 

Kim, I've been following the thread since the beginning, but can't recall. I remember your wanting to be flexible with the interior and even with conveniences as she's meant principally for daysailng, but I wonder what your current thoughts are for weekending. If I remember correctly there will be a toilet and hot water. Galley? Inside shower? Berths seem easy to add.

 

KDH,

 

She was originally conceived as a daysailor (heck in the beginning she was flush deck) but Bob, SWMBO and our two grown sons (both sailors) convinced me to make her more of a weekender, so she will have a simple galley, a composting head (thanks to Black and Kerry's suggestions and demonstration of theirs) two generous berths in the salon, a double berth forward, hot water and a simple pressure water system. And lots of empty spaces to keep her light and simple.

 

Here is Bob's layout for her:

Kim prelim construction wood (2).pdf

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Robert C Keefe wrote some interesting stories about Baruna and Bolero as well as Orient, once available online in PDF form SFYC website archives.

 

Couldn't find them in the archives though...

 

An excerpt from one of the PDF's....http://www.stfyc.com...760&chgs=&ssid=

 

A few PDF's that are still available:

 

http://www.cruisingc.../bws_bolero.pdf

 

On St Francis History below go to page 33

 

http://www.stfyc.com...ncisHistory.pdf

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Kim, by "cooler" I assume you mean coleman_cooler.jpg. In case at some point you want powered refrigeration have you allowed for a keel cooler arrangement? I regret not doing that in my build.

 

There are some portable coolers that plug into 12VDC. I haven't really investigated them much yet other than to visit Fisheries Supply and take a look at them and read the brochure. I want to keep any systems very simple on this vessel so the idea of portable coolers is attractive. Her primary use will be to daysail.

 

SWMBO and I have cruised offshore, I have raced offshore. This boat is just for the pure pleasure of sailing.

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Kimb. my boat had a refrigeration system in a former life, All we have now it the built in and well insulated cool box and we keep 3 litre water bottles in the freezer at home, 4 days easy and a week possible. Cheep, simple and it works.

I would consider the built in cool box, those plastic chilly bins are next to useless.

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It's a shame to paint over that beautiful bonding work. It's neat and clean and symetyrical and it has a great look to it.

 

I noticed that too...it means nothing in the bigger scheme, but it screams CRAFTSMANSHIP!!!

 

I'm very impressed.

 

Bob and I considered leaving it unpainted so the workmanship would be seen, but Bruce nixed that idea, he is very vested in how the finished product looks.

 

Maybe leave one small unpainted patch hidden somewhere so you can show people the level of craftsmanship involved. I'd hate to cover it all up.

 

Just leave the fairing and finish off inside of a locker so can demonstrate the technique and skill that went into the build. I had a friend who had built his Endurance 35 at a Ferro-Cement commune back when both were popular. He got tired of people looking puzzled when he would answer their question of 'What is your boat built of?" His stock answer was 'Concrete'. For some reason, most folks can accept a boat being built of steel, but concrete doesn't register. The owner/builder finally bought some fake brick veneer about 1/2" thick (Z-Brick) and glued it to the inside of the hull in the hanging locker with the mastic adhesive that comes with the product.

 

Then he would tell guests that he had built his boat of brick and loved to pull back the foul weather gear and proudly display the proof to his 'Doubting Thomas's'.

 

You could save up Popscicle sticks and do the same sort of thing when you tell people your boat is a wood/epoxy/composite!

 

When I worked at Gold Coast Yachts in St Croix building USCG certified day sailing catamarans, we planked the hulls with 3/4" Doug Fir up to the waterline and then 3/4" Western Red Cedar. It was done pretty much Quick and DIrty with the planks nailed to 3/4" ply frames on 3' centers. They used doubleheaded concrete forming nails so when the epoxy putty was partially cured all the nails were easily pulled and the excess putty in the seams was scraped loose, especially inside between the frames. A team of 10 guys could plank and putty a 50-60 foot hull in one long day. Scarfs were all done ahead of time and there was a team mixing and spreading putty along the edges and then two teams grabbing full length planks from the epoxy table and running to the boat and setting and nailing in place.

 

Next morning there would be a once over lightly with a huge side grinder spinning 16" squares of plywood with floor sanding paper stapled to it. The square corners kept the poor souls who this task fell to from digging in the edges as would surely happen with a regular round grinding pad. This quickly knocked down the putty in the seams and by afternoon the glass crew would blow the dust off and laminate Bi-Ax from sheer to sheer much like in the Slliver build. They didn't bother with the channels for the over laps, but only lapped the edges of the biax about an inch. Once again, the lamination was done in the remainder of the day and and additional layers added at the keel and especially the stem. While the laminating tools were getting cleaned up, and the glass got cheesy hard then tubs of epoxy and phenolic spheres (the brownish-red stuff) got mixed to peanut butter consistency and liberally applied. I mean slathered! I would try and trowel it more fair than was practice and get frustrating as it was too runny to do so. They just laughed and said, "Mon. Why bother, we just going to grind it fair manana!" The big square grinders would come out the next day and clouds of red dust would result. The nice thing was that the putty would go right on to the uncured FG so there were no secondary bond issues and they put enough that you were never sanding fiberglass. When you started to see the doubled thickness which were the laps at the edges, you quite sanding and then the long boards would come out. No matter how you do it, it is a lot of work, but they had it down to a nice balance between speed and PIA (pain in the ass). Not near as meticulous as the Sliver, but fairly pragmatic considering the nature of the work force. A good example of what Dick Newick called 'appropriate technology'.

More tedious was the inner laminate which was done by slicing full rolls of biax with a carbide blade on a sawsall to just fit between frames. While probably not as elegant than the full contiguous inner lamination as on Sliver, by the time that the inner fillets were done to the frames is was pretty stout. Once again, the fillets were applied right over the freshly laminated biax as well as a screed layer of putty to fill in most of the weave. The finished interiors were surprisingly clean and smooth.

The Coast Guard originally considered out method as 'plank of frame' which used an ages old and fairly uncomplicated scantling rule. For some reason, they rethought that categorization and declared it as 'composite' construction which made our engineering much more complicated. We had you make representative panels of the Doug Fir and Red Cedar layup schedules and submit for destructive testing and they performed far beyond anyones expectations. There are GCY cats out sailing daily for over 20 years now and other than cosmetic touch ups and some additional sheathing on the bows where the charter captains like to beach the boats, they have a enviable reputation for strength and longevity.

It has been interesting to see just how the strip planked fully encapsulated composite construction has evolved and especially how Sliver has has taken it to a pinnacle and she is such an exceptional example. She should last for generations and I can think of of more reassuring vessel to be offshore in. Well, maybe a friends Herreshoff 55 Marco Polo...

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Kimb. my boat had a refrigeration system in a former life, All we have now it the built in and well insulated cool box and we keep 3 litre water bottles in the freezer at home, 4 days easy and a week possible. Cheep, simple and it works.

I would consider the built in cool box, those plastic chilly bins are next to useless.

 

Yeah, we have had that system in past boats (frozen water bottles and all) works well.

 

I keep hearing that the new modern "chilly bins" are much better now and have some sort of super effective insulation, but I have not checked it out yet.

 

Who knows, we might end up with the previous system. Cheers!

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Kim

 

You seem to have been blessed with lots of room...have you considered on demand hot water?

 

I have an old Polarmo that works really well. It's not available but I believe Bosch has one that is marine rated.

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Well, maybe a friends Herreshoff 55 Marco Polo...

 

LFH's Marco Polo was one of the vessels that inspired the Sliver design.

 

We used 1" WRC for the entire hull except Fir for the keelson.

 

We also used square sanding pads on the rotary sanders.

 

Sounds like a lot of overlap between your builds and ours.

 

Great stuff thanks for the post.

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Kim

 

You seem to have been blessed with lots of room...have you considered on demand hot water?

 

I have an old Polarmo that works really well. It's not available but I believe Bosch has one that is marine rated.

 

Propane? I am trying to avoid extra fuel on board. I would look at a diesel one if it existed.

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Well, maybe a friends Herreshoff 55 Marco Polo...

 

LFH's Marco Polo was one of the vessels that inspired the Sliver design.

 

We used 1" WRC for the entire hull except Fir for the keelson.

 

We also used square sanding pads on the rotary sanders.

 

Sounds like a lot of overlap between your builds and ours.

 

Great stuff thanks for the post.

 

Yes, Ask Russ about GYC. He spent some time down there. I think that one of his old proas ended up there and eventually got rebuilt. Amazing that a couple of hippie/surfer/sailors were able to train the Rastas, Crucians, and Puerto Rican boys to build such nicely finished cats. There was a sign in the gable of a boat shed in St Martin where Peter Spronk was doing the same thing 10 years earlier that said "Jah Love Boatbuilding!"

 

The Spronk boats were built out of lapstrake Brunzeel plywood. Took lots more craftmanship but they had developed some tricks that made it all possible. Beautiful boats and man of them still making the rounds. None of this would have been possible though without the West brothers and the gap filling bond that epoxy allows. Like the old expression. 'Putty (epoxy) and paint make a carpenter (boatbuilder) what he ain't'

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Kimb. my boat had a refrigeration system in a former life, All we have now it the built in and well insulated cool box and we keep 3 litre water bottles in the freezer at home, 4 days easy and a week possible. Cheep, simple and it works.

I would consider the built in cool box, those plastic chilly bins are next to useless.

 

Yeah, we have had that system in past boats (frozen water bottles and all) works well.

 

 

Who knows, we might end up with the previous system. Cheers!

 

It's also a storage thing, not having a chilly bin floating around the boat is good, even for a daysail. also the cool box tens to collect beer, when you go for a sail just grab a bottle from the freazer and you have beer at the end of the sail.

It's what I'm using and the hassle of a refidge system isn't worth for me the way I use the boat.

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The owners of Baruna and Orient begat "Barient". My first employer after college, about '73. Heaps of stories. The time the paint factory next door caught fire and burning paint was running across the parking lot, building Ti winches for 12 meters, building 10s for early Santa Cruz boats and having them bitch about "tooooo heavy!!!" Good times! A long long time ago.

 

BV

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Your quite correct Beau...To really tell the whole story on Barient, one must include James Michael and his yawl Bolero, and Tim Moseley's Orient.

 

Robert Keefe had a lengthy history in PDF form in the Saint Francis YC Archives at one time on the story of how Barient came to be. I was searching there archives for that story as well, because it was very well written. Robert was Executive VP and General Manager of Barient and later became President of the Company.

 

I thought I heard Robert was writing a book about Saint Francis YC and many of the great yachts including Bolero, Baruna and Orient as well as a full history of Barient, did he ever finish it. He's an excellent writer and I found his stories quite interesting.

 

http://www.stfyc.com...ncisHistory.pdf

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Boomer,thanks a lot for those links. Brought back a lot of good memories. I looked around to find Keeves book about the club but came up empty. I did come up with "History of stfyc1927-2002 by Kimbal Livingston. http://www.chroniclebooks.com/landing-pages/custom/casestudies/stfrancis_yacht.html?cat=cultural It was written for the clubs 75th anniversary.

Sorry for hijack Kim. Back to coolers,heaters and one sweet boat :)

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Boomer,thanks a lot for those links. Brought back a lot of good memories. I looked around to find Keeves book about the club but came up empty. I did come up with "History of stfyc1927-2002 by Kimbal Livingston. http://www.chronicle...?cat=cultural It was written for the clubs 75th anniversary.

Sorry for hijack Kim. Back to coolers,heaters and one sweet boat :)

 

Sorry for hijacks about SFYC, Baruna, Bolero, Orient??? Are you kidding? Keep them coming!

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I don't think the Ocean Planet rails did much, not big enough to give much "lift" to the bow and caused pretty ugly drag at moderate speeds.

 

What we need are deployable spray shields that extend horizontally from the side of the boat to deflect the bow wave and are only extended on the windward side. After all, those race guys have canting keels, how much harder can it be to build a spray knocker-downer?? ;)/>

 

Had forgotten, but didn't the previous generation Open 60 and VOR 70s also try spray rails?

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It would sure be nice if folks were still racing boats like Bolero, Baruna and Orient off shore around here. Sadly, the current boats have become so painfully uncomfortable that I only know a few owners crazy enough to want to spend a night at sea aboard one. It wouldn't matter where one was, a night at sea - dock - anchor they would all be wonderful aboard any of these three old beauties.

 

BV

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I did go by and see the boat then called Bob, if any of you have the chance to see this beauty in person I strongly recommend it. The builders are creating a piece of art, the detail where it won't be seen is over the top. The best part was to re-connect with Bob and as I am in the Juan's (San Juan's that is) I plan on following the boats progress. I want to commend all involved, an exceptional designer, owner with an imagination and willingness to commission a very special boat and the builders are over the top. Joe Golberg

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  • 4 weeks later...

Kim is still posting updates. Just not here. He might come back. You never know. Can't see it at this point though. I'll see what I can do about getting the latest photos of the project over here.

 

Where?

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Kim is still posting updates. Just not here. He might come back. You never know. Can't see it at this point though. I'll see what I can do about getting the latest photos of the project over here.

 

Oh man

Who or what screwed the pooch?

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Monster:

Look around. Look who's missing these days. It's a long list. It's not just Kim who's left. But they are off enjoying themselves somewhere else. Our loss.

I'm still here and my "ignore" function works just fine. I'm not going to let a ratbag chase me off CA.

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Monster:

Look around. Look who's missing these days. It's a long list. It's not just Kim who's left. But they are off enjoying themselves somewhere else. Our loss.

I'm still here and my "ignore" function works just fine. I'm not going to let a ratbag chase me off CA.

 

Atta Boy!

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Monster:

Look around. Look who's missing these days. It's a long list. It's not just Kim who's left. But they are off enjoying themselves somewhere else. Our loss.

I'm still here and my "ignore" function works just fine. I'm not going to let a ratbag chase me off CA.

 

Oh, I'm with ya, Bob.

 

I know why the others left and, to the people flinging shit, I'm sure they are proud of themselves but, I don't see a reason for me to completely leave.

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Damnit.. I return after a summer-long hiatus, and it seems that it was a real shit-fest in here :( Oh well, at least I'm pseudo back as time allows ;) .

 

Bob - other than your blog, where else can I see updates on Sliver? I've been looking forward to seeing this thing finished since this thread started..

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Monster:

Look around. Look who's missing these days. It's a long list. It's not just Kim who's left. But they are off enjoying themselves somewhere else. Our loss.

I'm still here and my "ignore" function works just fine. I'm not going to let a ratbag chase me off CA.

 

Thx for the reply but I don't spend enough time in here to notice who's missing or know why. Worst forum I ever read was the FT10 one when akagp was at his worst..

Hopefully things didn't get that bad here.

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I've said this before so forgive me for repeating myself, but this has been a truly awesome thread. Hearing about this project as it happens from the perspective of the owner, designer and the builder has been unique. The majority of the hijacks have been good reads as well. I sure hope it continues.

 

Chris

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I've said this before so forgive me for repeating myself, but this has been a truly awesome thread. Hearing about this project as it happens from the perspective of the owner, designer and the builder has been unique. The majority of the hijacks have been good reads as well. I sure hope it continues.

 

Chris

 

+1

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I've said this before so forgive me for repeating myself, but this has been a truly awesome thread. Hearing about this project as it happens from the perspective of the owner, designer and the builder has been unique. The majority of the hijacks have been good reads as well. I sure hope it continues.

 

Chris

 

+2

 

Miss the discussions

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