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How about that Thomas Voeckler!!

 

Got to love a gritty guy like that!

 

(Is it a hijack if it is my thread?)

 

Caddel will catch him in the Pyrenees.Its his time, now or never!! Oh and interior plan please!

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Ummm, .... can you really use "stand out" and "understated" in the same sentence? 60 feet loa and a minimalist boat aren't understated.

 

 

 

 

Veeger,

 

I think it can stand out, and for the reasons Kim states. Sure it will be grand. A 60 loa boat like that can't actually hide in the bushes. I think the minimalist will really shine the closer and longer you look. I'm sure Kim will enjoy all the questions, his answers, and the responses very much.

 

"So where is the [latest electronic gadget]?"

 

"Don't have one."

 

"What about integration with

  1. ?"

 

"Don't have those either."

 

"But, how will you navigate this thing."

 

I think this is where Kim just get's to smile.

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This might be a case were going a bit high tech might keep it simpler in the long run. A simple 12v system for lights would be easyer than keeping track of numerous self contained interior lights and their individual batteries. Kimb will need 12v navigation lights anyways, so why have 2 systems. Use the best LED bulbs and a single house battery would work. Instruments can be kept simple, but in the PNW there a lots of issues with tides and currents so depth and a knotmeter are good to have. A combined sensor in a single through hull that feeds to a wireless transmiter means you could use a tablet in the cockpit that could also double as a chartplotter. Back ups could be a hand held gps. This would reduce wiring and the need to mount repeaters in the cockpit. Wind insturmnents are not really needed, but could be added later. I do not know if he plans to use the boat in the off season, but around here winter sailing is reasonable, but heat is needed if you stay out overnight. A wood burning stove is simple, but you need to store the fuel sorce and deal with the mess, so a forced air furnace that runs on diesel (which I assume he will have on board already) would be the smallest solution, and the only one that would warm up a 60 ft boat using a single heat source.

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Steele:

That is all lovely but it is not the boat we have in mind.

Kim commutes accross Puget Spound daily in an open 18' skiff. No dodger, no Bimini, no nothin.

I often look out the window in the morning, rain coming down sideways and I think of Kim bouncing accross the Sound in that open boat.

We do get a bit of rain here.

I truly doubt that Kim as even considered a heater for the new boat.

I had to pressure him into putting a head in it.

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How about that Thomas Voeckler!!

 

Got to love a gritty guy like that!

 

(Is it a hijack if it is my thread?)

 

Yup, it's a hijack.

 

Yup, he is one hell of a bike guy. I loved the look on his face during that last climb - pure pain!

 

I wonder how much his legs have left, this race has a lot of mountains to go. But it's great to see him hanging on!!

 

Beau

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Kim & Bob,

 

I just hefted the running lights I use on the Moore-24, they are the flashlight sort that use D-size batteries internally, and they are pretty damn lite (in all senses of that invented word). I have stuck with them because I rarely sail at night and when I do these are USCG legal (sort of - These are for boats 22' and under, my Moore-24 was stunted at birth ;-) ). Cool think is that I can get them off the bow and stern when not in use and stow them amidships where the weight belongs and where they don't get in the way. I know there's a higher power rating for boats over 20 meters, although I think there are lights of this style for that size too.

 

They come with LED bulbs and are quite low weight.

 

Beau

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Steele:

That is all lovely but it is not the boat we have in mind.

Kim commutes accross Puget Spound daily in an open 18' skiff. No dodger, no Bimini, no nothin.

I often look out the window in the morning, rain coming down sideways and I think of Kim bouncing accross the Sound in that open boat.

We do get a bit of rain here.

I truly doubt that Kim as even considered a heater for the new boat.

I had to pressure him into putting a head in it.

 

I have clearly underestimated his ability to tolerate adverse conditions. It sounds like a couple of flashlights and a sleeping bag might just do the trick. You might consider at least running open conduit durring the build so things can be added at a later date without drilling holes through this work of art. I do not want to imply Kim would ever want such frivolous junk, but perhaps he might like to bring someone else on a sail who does not have as thick skin.

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Steele:

That is a good idea. You never know, if Kim sells the boat the next owner might even want berth cushions.

But I have a feeling that Kim will keep this boat a long time.

 

Maybe holes where the conduit should go?? That'll lighten the boat and allow the install of the conduit later if needed. Two birds - one stone.

 

BV

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Beau:

That's exactly what I was thinking. No use carrying around a bunch of vacant conduit. A few well placed holes in bhds. Maybe one up under the deck outboard and one each side in the bilge would be enough.

I'll work on Kim. I'll pretend it's to save weight. Yeah, that's it.

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How about that Thomas Voeckler!!

 

Got to love a gritty guy like that!

 

(Is it a hijack if it is my thread?)

 

Caddel will catch him in the Pyrenees.Its his time, now or never!! Oh and interior plan please!

 

 

I am actually rooting for Cadel and expect him to win it in the time trial.....

 

Veegs:

You don't ask that question and I would not expect Kim to answer it unless he said somethng like, "Under a million."

 

Yes, I do expect to keep her under a million.

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How about that Thomas Voeckler!!

 

Got to love a gritty guy like that!

 

(Is it a hijack if it is my thread?)

 

Caddel will catch him in the Pyrenees.Its his time, now or never!! Oh and interior plan please!

 

 

I am actually rooting for Cadel and expect him to win it in the time trial.....

 

Veegs:

You don't ask that question and I would not expect Kim to answer it unless he said somethng like, "Under a million."

 

Yes, I do expect to keep her under a million.

 

 

Fair enough Kim.

 

Bob, I've never been one to shy away from being non PC. This IS sailing / cruising anarchy so I feel no restriction on the 'rules'. I understand that it's sensitive to some. So, too, is the usual CA greeting but that never stops folks! Good to know that it's under a mil--wouldn't want him taken advantage of...

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Kim,

 

I don't think we can count Contador out - he can be stunningly fast if he can figure out how to stop falling off the bike. I think that the Shleck Brothers will be right there and could prove a "problem" for a lot of people. We're going to find out soon.

 

 

Bob,

 

The "holes" are definitely to make the boat lighter ;-). They also allow for better ventilation and can serve as massive limber holes if some foredeck animal leaves the hatch open by mistake.

 

BV

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This might be a case were going a bit high tech might keep it simpler in the long run. A simple 12v system for lights would be easyer than keeping track of numerous self contained interior lights and their individual batteries. Kimb will need 12v navigation lights anyways, so why have 2 systems. Use the best LED bulbs and a single house battery would work. Instruments can be kept simple, but in the PNW there a lots of issues with tides and currents so depth and a knotmeter are good to have. A combined sensor in a single through hull that feeds to a wireless transmiter means you could use a tablet in the cockpit that could also double as a chartplotter. Back ups could be a hand held gps. This would reduce wiring and the need to mount repeaters in the cockpit. Wind insturmnents are not really needed, but could be added later. I do not know if he plans to use the boat in the off season, but around here winter sailing is reasonable, but heat is needed if you stay out overnight. A wood burning stove is simple, but you need to store the fuel sorce and deal with the mess, so a forced air furnace that runs on diesel (which I assume he will have on board already) would be the smallest solution, and the only one that would warm up a 60 ft boat using a single heat source.

 

She will have heat. SWMBO has insisted on it.

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Steele:

That is all lovely but it is not the boat we have in mind.

Kim commutes accross Puget Spound daily in an open 18' skiff. No dodger, no Bimini, no nothin.

I often look out the window in the morning, rain coming down sideways and I think of Kim bouncing accross the Sound in that open boat.

We do get a bit of rain here.

I truly doubt that Kim as even considered a heater for the new boat.

I had to pressure him into putting a head in it.

 

I have clearly underestimated his ability to tolerate adverse conditions. It sounds like a couple of flashlights and a sleeping bag might just do the trick. You might consider at least running open conduit durring the build so things can be added at a later date without drilling holes through this work of art. I do not want to imply Kim would ever want such frivolous junk, but perhaps he might like to bring someone else on a sail who does not have as thick skin.

 

Like SWMBO?

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Steele:

That is a good idea. You never know, if Kim sells the boat the next owner might even want berth cushions.

But I have a feeling that Kim will keep this boat a long time.

 

I expect this vessel to be passed on to my two sailing sons, they have expressed considerable interest in such an event.

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This might be a case were going a bit high tech might keep it simpler in the long run. A simple 12v system for lights would be easyer than keeping track of numerous self contained interior lights and their individual batteries. Kimb will need 12v navigation lights anyways, so why have 2 systems. Use the best LED bulbs and a single house battery would work. Instruments can be kept simple, but in the PNW there a lots of issues with tides and currents so depth and a knotmeter are good to have. A combined sensor in a single through hull that feeds to a wireless transmiter means you could use a tablet in the cockpit that could also double as a chartplotter. Back ups could be a hand held gps. This would reduce wiring and the need to mount repeaters in the cockpit. Wind insturmnents are not really needed, but could be added later. I do not know if he plans to use the boat in the off season, but around here winter sailing is reasonable, but heat is needed if you stay out overnight. A wood burning stove is simple, but you need to store the fuel sorce and deal with the mess, so a forced air furnace that runs on diesel (which I assume he will have on board already) would be the smallest solution, and the only one that would warm up a 60 ft boat using a single heat source.

 

She will have heat. SWMBO has insisted on it.

 

Small Dickenson diesel heater? Ours works great.

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Beau:

That's exactly what I was thinking. No use carrying around a bunch of vacant conduit. A few well placed holes in bhds. Maybe one up under the deck outboard and one each side in the bilge would be enough.

I'll work on Kim. I'll pretend it's to save weight. Yeah, that's it.

 

+1

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Grandma and Grandpa KimB took their International Dragon for multi-week cruises with one big air mattress and sleeping bags in their 70's so I think this boat will be plenty comfy.

 

Last summer Pretty Wife and I cruised our J22 without instruments. We had a few days of major fog, I did the navigating with a stop watch and compass. Makes for good mental gymnastics. Again after the J22 I think Sliver no matter the interior will seem rather nice. I am getting all excited to take her around the islands seeing the photos of the planking progressing.

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This might be a case were going a bit high tech might keep it simpler in the long run. A simple 12v system for lights would be easyer than keeping track of numerous self contained interior lights and their individual batteries. Kimb will need 12v navigation lights anyways, so why have 2 systems. Use the best LED bulbs and a single house battery would work. Instruments can be kept simple, but in the PNW there a lots of issues with tides and currents so depth and a knotmeter are good to have. A combined sensor in a single through hull that feeds to a wireless transmiter means you could use a tablet in the cockpit that could also double as a chartplotter. Back ups could be a hand held gps. This would reduce wiring and the need to mount repeaters in the cockpit. Wind insturmnents are not really needed, but could be added later. I do not know if he plans to use the boat in the off season, but around here winter sailing is reasonable, but heat is needed if you stay out overnight. A wood burning stove is simple, but you need to store the fuel sorce and deal with the mess, so a forced air furnace that runs on diesel (which I assume he will have on board already) would be the smallest solution, and the only one that would warm up a 60 ft boat using a single heat source.

 

She will have heat. SWMBO has insisted on it.

 

 

Steele:

That is a good idea. You never know, if Kim sells the boat the next owner might even want berth cushions.

But I have a feeling that Kim will keep this boat a long time.

 

I expect this vessel to be passed on to my two sailing sons, they have expressed considerable interest in such an event.

 

Listen to SHMBO, its a Cardinal rule. As for the sons, why wouldn't they? Loving the vicarious thrill Kim, keep it coming. Go Cadell!!

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Steele:

That is a good idea. You never know, if Kim sells the boat the next owner might even want berth cushions.

But I have a feeling that Kim will keep this boat a long time.

 

I expect this vessel to be passed on to my two sailing sons, they have expressed considerable interest in such an event.

 

Any interest in adopting another son? I'm only slightly used, with just a few gray hairs. Good as new, really. ;)

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Does that wood smell as good as it looks Kim? Great pics.

 

 

 

Sadly I suspect that there's a lot more glue to smell than one might like. Certainly looks pretty though.

 

Yesterday I was there when they were applying epoxy to the strips and it really wasn't too bad. Lots of wood and wood shavings from other projects appeared to overpower the epoxy smell, as it should. A couple guys were using the big heavy old fashion planner for another project, that's why the ear protectors, but that planning made for some good smells.

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I don't recall any glue smell at all. Could be I'm just used to it. I do recall a very pungent aroma of different woods. The Purple Heart they used in the stem of one boat I waas standing next too had a very strong and sharp smell. It smelled great.

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Bob, is the planking intended to be a structural component or is it merely the core for the glass sheathing? Workmanship looks very good.

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From:

The planking is the major structural elemement. Cedar is way too heavy to be used as just a core. The glass skins will also add strength so in fact you could consider this boat a "composite" boat.

The deck is glass over foam.

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Isn't it wonderful that one of the most interesting boats in years is being built as a day sailor, discussed in the Cruising section of this board, and has absolutely no regard for any "racing rule".

 

This reminds me A LOT of when Merlin and Eclipse were being built in Santa Cruz. Of course, Kim probably won't ever "race" the Sliver.... after all, he won't have all the high tech stuff it takes to be "successful" at racing..... na, he'll just sail around with a drink in his hands and wave politely as he passes folks.

 

Sure, that's what he'll do.

 

B-))

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Isn't it wonderful that one of the most interesting boats in years is being built as a day sailor, discussed in the Cruising section of this board, and has absolutely no regard for any "racing rule".

 

We can use it as the basis for a "commission rule." If you want to race, you send a picture of your boat to Bob. He checks to see if the commission has been paid. If so, you race boat-for-boat. If the commission has not been paid, your rating is "you lose!"

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Beau, you know... it's only racing when you win.

 

Sons, I disagree, it's always racing and only stops being racing when you are about to loose! B-)

 

My kids used to shout "Sail HO!" whenever they saw someone on the horizon and then dash out to check the tell-tales on the jib when we were in the middle of the Pacific! The apple didn't fall far from the tree. Their assumption is that we were always racing. Pretty funny.

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Grandma and Grandpa KimB took their International Dragon for multi-week cruises with one big air mattress and sleeping bags in their 70's so I think this boat will be plenty comfy.

 

Last summer Pretty Wife and I cruised our J22 without instruments. We had a few days of major fog, I did the navigating with a stop watch and compass. Makes for good mental gymnastics. Again after the J22 I think Sliver no matter the interior will seem rather nice. I am getting all excited to take her around the islands seeing the photos of the planking progressing.

 

 

Speaking of my dear departed parents and their Dragon......

post-8115-095134700 1311100175_thumb.jpg

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Grandma and Grandpa KimB took their International Dragon for multi-week cruises with one big air mattress and sleeping bags in their 70's so I think this boat will be plenty comfy.

 

Last summer Pretty Wife and I cruised our J22 without instruments. We had a few days of major fog, I did the navigating with a stop watch and compass. Makes for good mental gymnastics. Again after the J22 I think Sliver no matter the interior will seem rather nice. I am getting all excited to take her around the islands seeing the photos of the planking progressing.

 

 

Speaking of my dear departed parents and their Dragon......

 

Looks like a perfectly good cruising boat to me!!!

 

B-))

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How about that Thomas Voeckler!!

 

Got to love a gritty guy like that!

 

(Is it a hijack if it is my thread?)

 

/hijack on

 

Kim!

 

Did you see today's race!! Voeckler rode so far beyond himself it was astounding! He owes Evens a big "Thank You" for towing him for so long, but it took big big heart to climb like that. Andy S showed some tremendous power, but the real winner was Voeckler - amazing to see an effort like that. I take back what I said about Contador, he's sliding off the back now unless something terrible happens to the big boys he may not even end up in the top 5. What a day in the mountains!

 

You called it buddy!

 

Beau

 

/hijack

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How about that Thomas Voeckler!!

 

Got to love a gritty guy like that!

 

(Is it a hijack if it is my thread?)

 

/hijack on

 

Kim!

 

Did you see today's race!! Voeckler rode so far beyond himself it was astounding! He owes Evens a big "Thank You" for towing him for so long, but it took big big heart to climb like that. Andy S showed some tremendous power, but the real winner was Voeckler - amazing to see an effort like that. I take back what I said about Contador, he's sliding off the back now unless something terrible happens to the big boys he may not even end up in the top 5. What a day in the mountains!

 

You called it buddy!

 

Beau

 

/hijack

 

As a former serious racer I know what Tommy went through today. Not pretty. I have ridden that climb (in both directions) and my legs hurt thinking about how Tommy was suffering. My hat is off to him.

 

The French will never forget his efforts in this tour. He will join the ranks of the legendary Raymond Poulidor as an all time French favorite. (I noticed that Poulidor was one of the podium greeters last week in an previous stage when Tommy got one of his (count them!) Ten Yellow Jerseys in this Tour. Tommy was smiling broadly to have "Poupou" shake his hand and "Poupou" was smiling broadly to have Tommy in Yellow.)

 

Tomorrow will be interesting (I have ridden tomorrow's climb too.) There are a number of possible outcomes. This Tour is not over yet.

 

TT on Saturday will be a tense one, like when Greg beat Fignon by eight seconds in the final TT back in the 80's.

 

This has been the most interesting (and possibly cleanest) Tour in years.

 

"Poupou" as he is today at 75.

220px-Poulidor.jpg

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Beau, you know... it's only racing when you win.

 

Sons, I disagree, it's always racing and only stops being racing when you are about to loose! B-)

 

My kids used to shout "Sail HO!" whenever they saw someone on the horizon and then dash out to check the tell-tales on the jib when we were in the middle of the Pacific! The apple didn't fall far from the tree. Their assumption is that we were always racing. Pretty funny.

Racing has always been defined as "two boats sailing in the same direction"

 

When did you guys miss that?

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Beau, you know... it's only racing when you win.

 

Sons, I disagree, it's always racing and only stops being racing when you are about to loose! B-)

 

My kids used to shout "Sail HO!" whenever they saw someone on the horizon and then dash out to check the tell-tales on the jib when we were in the middle of the Pacific! The apple didn't fall far from the tree. Their assumption is that we were always racing. Pretty funny.

Racing has always been defined as "two boats sailing in the same direction"

 

When did you guys miss that?

 

Hey, in the middle of an Ocean you alway change course to go sail alongside of everyone you see, at least we always did. That turns it into a race. At least for a while until some spoil sport in the crew points out that we're sailing at some massive angle to the rhumb-line.

 

B-))

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/Hijack on

 

Kim,

 

I know that today took a lot out of people's legs, I am guessing that some more than others. But from the way things wound up, I think it took a lot out of some people's hearts too. I had no idea you were a "real" rider. Good for you.

 

/hijack off

 

Now, as a weight saving device for the Sliver, you could try one of my favorite ideas which I've only seen on a small boat. It was a fixed bike with the chain attached to a prop. The guy just peddled the boat around and it really moved right along. OK - probably not very practical for a 60' boat, his was tiny. But it would be a lot lighter than a motor and now that we know you've got the legs for it..... B-))

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/Hijack on

 

Kim,

 

I know that today took a lot out of people's legs, I am guessing that some more than others. But from the way things wound up, I think it took a lot out of some people's hearts too. I had no idea you were a "real" rider. Good for you.

 

/hijack off

 

Now, as a weight saving device for the Sliver, you could try one of my favorite ideas which I've only seen on a small boat. It was a fixed bike with the chain attached to a prop. The guy just peddled the boat around and it really moved right along. OK - probably not very practical for a 60' boat, his was tiny. But it would be a lot lighter than a motor and now that we know you've got the legs for it..... B-))

 

I HAD the legs 35 years ago.........I raced seriously in the 60's & 70's. I am a bit older now. These are from 2005.

post-8115-016345600 1311308974_thumb.jpeg

post-8115-006387800 1311308990_thumb.jpeg

post-8115-079496600 1311309027_thumb.jpeg

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kimb, Looking great. Can you explain again why you went from the planks that curved into each other to the square (on end) planks for the wet part of the hull? This was in the pics from earlier in the week when Bob's "father" was sawing off the ends...(sorry I was in a local regatta and got behind)

 

[hijack]

As someone that has recently (in the last 2-3 years) gotten into road bikes for exercise & recreation (& we are even picking up an entry level bike for Mrs. Bitches), I am not really into "Le Tour", but several of my more seasoned road bike friends are...I'll sit down and watch it with them, but I certainly am not thinking about finding the remote to turn it on myself...I just ride to save my knees & try to keep the cholesterol numbers in check because I don't like running anymore and the scenery is more interesting at 15-18MPH than at 6-7 MPH. Is an interest in the Tour something that you get into after doing it for a while, or am I the weirdo? :ph34r: I also couldn't really have given two shits about the last America's Cup either, but sailboat racing is still one of my favorite passions. :huh:

[/hijack]

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[hijack]

 

Bitches,

 

I started out as a rec-rider (and I still am) as well, and what happened was I began to test myself against a crowd of young guys who took pity on me and let me suck a wheel for hours as they worked out on their semi-pro team. My nicname is "Gramps" and they are really a great bunch of 20 year old. After a while I found that by sucking their wheels for about 40 miles I could use my rested legs to actually pass them at the finish. The first time I did that they started throwing water bottles at me and squirting me and calling me well-deserved names. I was hooked.

 

While I'll NEVER be a competitive bike races, I have developed an appreciation for what I'm watching even though I don't pretend to understand it all. It's also fascinating to read up on the physiology and other science that is involved now. This sport is pushing hard at the limits of what humans can do, and that's interesting (at least to me).

 

[/hijack]

 

BTW - for those who care, and so we can stop cluttering up Kim's thread, there is a Tour Anarchy thread here:

 

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=123713&hl=bike&st=0

 

BV

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Mr. Bitches:

The convex and concave sides of the planks were planed off to help with some of the tighter bends thru the turn of the bilge and make fairing easier. I actually think it had more to do with the fairing. It seems the way you imagine that concave side working to help smooth out the bend is excatly the opposite to what they found in reality. It surprised me.

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Ah...OK...gotcha...the square edges may bend easier in the harder turning areas of the bilge, waterline, etc..

 

[hijack] - thanks for your personal story, BV! I am actually the younger guy in our crowd (men & women), & we have some people in our group that ride more than a hundred miles (maybe 200, i dunno) per week. - it is real hot here, so I am once or maybe twice per week right now. B)

Before I had a decent bike, I borrowed a bike early on from a guy that had 55,000 miles on the bike computer. (That included "on the trainer" too.)

Ok, no more bike crap in the Sliver thread from me. :ph34r: [/hijack]

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Ah...OK...gotcha...the square edges may bend easier in the harder turning areas of the bilge, waterline, etc..

 

[hijack] - thanks for your personal story, BV! I am actually the younger guy in our crowd (men & women), & we have some people in our group that ride more than a hundred miles (maybe 200, i dunno) per week. - it is real hot here, so I am once or maybe twice per week right now. B)

Before I had a decent bike, I borrowed a bike early on from a guy that had 55,000 miles on the bike computer. (That included "on the trainer" too.)

Ok, no more bike crap in the Sliver thread from me. :ph34r: [/hijack]

 

"Bike Crap" is ALWAYS welcomed on MY thread!!

 

KimB on Alpe d'Huez circa 2005

post-8115-011673600 1311392275_thumb.jpg

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Ah...OK...gotcha...the square edges may bend easier in the harder turning areas of the bilge, waterline, etc..

 

[hijack] - thanks for your personal story, BV! I am actually the younger guy in our crowd (men & women), & we have some people in our group that ride more than a hundred miles (maybe 200, i dunno) per week. - it is real hot here, so I am once or maybe twice per week right now. B)

Before I had a decent bike, I borrowed a bike early on from a guy that had 55,000 miles on the bike computer. (That included "on the trainer" too.)

Ok, no more bike crap in the Sliver thread from me. :ph34r: [/hijack]

 

"Bike Crap" is ALWAYS welcomed on MY thread!!

 

KimB on Alpe d'Huez circa 2005

 

To reprise my comment on that post, "nice legs".

 

Big day for Cadell tonight our time.

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Big day for Cadell tonight our time.

 

VERY BIG DAY for Cadel.

 

He is the first Aussie to wear the Yellow into Paris!

 

Great controlled Tour for "Cuddles"

 

World Champ and Tour de France winner.

 

What a great career he has put together.

 

(There is plenty of time for Andy to win a future Tour.)

 

Hats off to Aussie cycling!

 

(I once rode training rides with Phil Anderson who paved the way for Aussie cycling.)

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I watched the Tour this morning.

What I don;t understand is this, why is it over now?.

Why do they not race tomorrow?

Is it tradition that they all just parade into Paris in their current positions?

 

I noticed some of those helmets have little bumps all over the leading edge. Interesting.

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Bob, these are similar to whale carbuncles. Seriously! Here is an interesting read on the subject.

 

Composite72.jpg

 

 

The humpback whale has pronounced bumps or tubercles along the leading edge of its pectoral flippers (above left). A idealized model of the flipper (above upper right), which was tested in a wind tunnel, demonstrated that the tubercles enhanced hydrodynamic performance, particularly by delaying stall (i.e., dramatic loss of lift) of the flipper with increasing angle of attack. The tubercles were placed on biomimetic windmill blades (above lower right) and tested by the Canadian company WhalePower. In August 2009, the tubercle technology design for windmills was honored as a finalist for the INDEX Award in Copenhagen, Denmark (below). Application of the tubercle technology has been taken up by the companies WhalePower for use in wind turbines, fans, pumps and compressors, EnviraNorth for large ventilation fans, and Earth for surfboard skegs.

 

 

More at this site, you might even learn what NACA section dolphins use for their fins...

 

 

<a href="http://darwin.wcupa.edu/~biology/fish/research/index.html">http://darwin.wcupa.edu/~biology/fish/research/index.html enjoy!

 

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Rap:

We put 3 whale bumps on ICON's rudder on the leading edge to help prevent it from stalling when pressed hard. Paul Bieker did the bump design.

 

I think the helmet bumps are vortex generators and very different to whale bump.

Caddell did not have them on his helmet.

I also noticed a coupe of the helmets are very rounded tariling adges instead of the usual long point.

It sure would be fun to be involved in wind tunnell testing of things like that.

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Mr. Bitches:

The convex and concave sides of the planks were planed off to help with some of the tighter bends thru the turn of the bilge and make fairing easier. I actually think it had more to do with the fairing. It seems the way you imagine that concave side working to help smooth out the bend is excatly the opposite to what they found in reality. It surprised me.

 

Bob and HB,

The bead and cove edges will interlock nicely on a tighter turn but issues can arise later when you're sanding the hull. The thin material of the edges of the concave, cove strip, will get sanded away leaving a gap between it and the beaded edge of the adjacent strip. That means using more filler later to bridge that gap.. On the flatter topsides. there's not as much sanding to do compared with the turn in the bilge, hence it's a quicker build to use the bead and cove interlocking strips on those flatter areas. By using a square edge that's slightly beveled to mate squarely with the adjacent strip's edge, the seam is tight no matter how much you sand down the surface.

 

On long square edge strips that not only bend longitudinally, but twist slightly around a curve, there's a lot of "art" in cutting different angles of bevel along the strip so it mates cleanly with the adjacent strip's beveled edge.

 

Great work Kim. I'm looking forward to seeing her.

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I watched the Tour this morning.

What I don;t understand is this, why is it over now?.

Why do they not race tomorrow?

Is it tradition that they all just parade into Paris in their current positions?

 

I noticed some of those helmets have little bumps all over the leading edge. Interesting.

 

Cadel has 1:30 over Andy, no way would BMC let Andy go down the road to try and take it back. Now if it were two or three seconds we might see something different, but you can count on Big George putting the hammer down if Leopard tried anything tomorrow. And Big George can go full gas with the best of them if the Yellow Jersey is at risk, and Marcus etal would help him at the task.

 

Traditionally one does not mess with the celebration of the last day which is suppose to be for the Green Jersey Sprinters on the Champs, especially with that big of a gap.

 

The only time the last day was not a parade up to the sprint was of course the LeMond vs. Fignon battle in I think it was 1989(?) when the organizers had a final TT into Paris for the last day and Greg took back 58 seconds to win by the narrowest margin ever +8 seconds! There will never be another finish like that one, but today was pretty special.

 

Great tour and for reasons I will not bore you all with I believe the cleanest Tour in years. I really don't think any of the contenders were juiced.

 

(The helmet bumps came out of wind tunnel testing.)

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Big day for Cadell tonight our time.

 

VERY BIG DAY for Cadel.

 

He is the first Aussie to wear the Yellow into Paris!

 

Great controlled Tour for "Cuddles"

 

World Champ and Tour de France winner.

 

What a great career he has put together.

 

(There is plenty of time for Andy to win a future Tour.)

 

Hats off to Aussie cycling!

 

(I once rode training rides with Phil Anderson who paved the way for Aussie cycling.)

 

A huge day for Aussi cycling, GO CADEL!!!!!!!

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Kim: Thanks for that info.

 

If the helmet bumps came out of wind tunnell testing why did Caddell not have bumps on his helmet?

 

 

Unknown Captain!

 

Just got back in from some 30 Square Metre Sailing. Lovely day.

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Tour de France, check!

 

Webber on pole for the German F1, check.

 

Stoner on the front row for the MotoGP @ Laguna Seka, check.

 

Kicked some South African butt in the Rugby Tri-Nations, check.

 

Not a bad weekends work team!! The beers on me.

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Paps:

I have had a weird last four days dealing with the hospital where they killed my son.

I go from intense grief to intense anger and the anger has been taking over.

I am really tired of being angry.

Tuesday I have a meeting with the hospital. I'm taking a body guard.

Not to protect me but to protect them from me.

If my son Max comes to the meeting they will have to be ready for 6'5", no body fat, of an angry brother.

It's not a fun place to be.

As an American I am supposed to be courteous and civil in this situation.

But there is enough Australian left in me that I don't think I can face them with civility. And I don't want to.

They can make all the excuses they like.

My kid will never walk through my front door again.

Hate to burden you with this but up here at the beach I have few outlets for my anger.

I'll go beat the puppy now. But she is so damn cute I can't beat her.

 

I feel good for Cadel.

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Our support and thoughts are with you, Bob.

 

Let me know if you need a kick-ass, assertive critical care nurse, in your corner at the ring. I am not intimidated by doctors and I am a strong believer in advocacy for patients and their families. If you need or want any support, I will do whatever I can to advocate, or answer any medical questions. Email or call anytime

 

Hang in there.

Booms

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Paps:

I have had a weird last four days dealing with the hospital where they killed my son.

I go from intense grief to intense anger and the anger has been taking over.

I am really tired of being angry.

Tuesday I have a meeting with the hospital. I'm taking a body guard.

Not to protect me but to protect them from me.

If my son Max comes to the meeting they will have to be ready for 6'5", no body fat, of an angry brother.

It's not a fun place to be.

As an American I am supposed to be courteous and civil in this situation.

But there is enough Australian left in me that I don't think I can face them with civility. And I don't want to.

They can make all the excuses they like.

My kid will never walk through my front door again.

Hate to burden you with this but up here at the beach I have few outlets for my anger.

I'll go beat the puppy now. But she is so damn cute I can't beat her.

 

I feel good for Cadel.

 

Bob;

I hear what you are saying mate and I would feel exactly the same.

Good idea taking a minder along, you might eat one of the pricks if they start arse covering, which they will surely try !!

You can vent on me/us all you want, that's what mates are for.

Have you decided what to do about the Quack who put him there, or more correctly failed to send him there soon enough?? I would be very tempted to sue the fuckers arse off!!

As you know though, none of this will bring him back and may even just extend more pain.

My Stepdaughter got badly rear ended yesterday, thank god she's fine but the car is toast. A bit scary when she is 1K miles away.

Nice to see the Aussi blood is still pumping through your veins Bob, couldn't have you going ALL Seppo on me!!

 

Cheers mate and take care.

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Rap:

We put 3 whale bumps on ICON's rudder on the leading edge to help prevent it from stalling when pressed hard. Paul Bieker did the bump design.

 

 

Bob, I learned about whale tubercles on my recent trip to swim with Humpbacks. I was passing out after dinner during the presentation, but woke right up and started thinking about modifying and mutilating various boat appendages.

 

Specifically, the first one that occurred to me was to put bumps along the leading edges of the fins on my Mirage Drive. The main Mirage Drive expert over on the Hobie forum nearly has me talked out of it, but what do you think?

 

Fin-MotionSDW200px.gif

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Tom:

I think you don't have a stalling problem, no ventilating. Your blades never clear thew water. So I'm not sure the bumps would do anything.

Essentially the bumps creat a flow on their upper side that prevents flow travelling down to the tip. In short the bumps help keep the flow attached and travelling in the right direction.

That is how I understand their function.

My neighbor has a Mirage drive kayak. Quite impressice just so long as there are two on it. When he takes it out alone he loses alost 42" of DWL and his trim is very stern down.

I noted that the mini man powered sub that won the contest this year was powered by the Mirage drive.

 

Thanks for the support guys. It just built up on me yesterday.

I'll go sailing today.

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Can't blame you for letting it get to you. When you get whacked on the noggin by the fiduciary duty of institutions 'of care' to their whatevers, it can suck big time. I'm faced with it sometime in the future as the result of vehicular assault, and it is daunting. I seriously ask myself 'what would Spike do'. And then I get all weepy.

 

More's the pity.

 

Paul

 

And hummingbirds can outmaneuver swallows.

 

And my WaterRat rudder has NEVER spun out on Amati.

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They keep adding more strips to the hull, I guess that is the way we get a hull that floats.

 

It's absolutely beautiful!!

 

(Thanks for your thoughts on the Tour, quite interesting.)

 

BV

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I dunno Kim.

Those strips add a lot of weight.

 

I'll be OK tomorrow.

A certain CA member who shall remain un-named has spent all day preparing me.

"Don't engage the head doctor in a debate over medical proceedure."

 

Fine, but if he even mentions keels or rudders I'm going to rip his throat out.

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I dunno Kim.

Those strips add a lot of weight.

 

 

No worries Bob, we have switched to the super light weight cedar strips for the rest of the build.

 

What we do have to make sure of is good fairing before we sheath the hull, That filler compound stuff is heavy, we want to use as little as possible.

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In the last picture it looks like they are switching to a scarf joint on the last strip, the other joints that I see are butted. Is it because they are getting close to the turn in the hull or just trying something different?

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Ken:

Pretty sure that all the joints are scarfed. I think they are scarfing them in place so you may be looking at a plank that has not been scarfed yet. I remember hearing the shipwrights discussing how it was easier to scarf in place.

 

I think what you are seeing as the end of a butt joint is really the end of a scarf but turned 90 degrees.

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They keep adding more strips to the hull, I guess that is the way we get a hull that floats.

 

Kimb -

 

This may be one of the dumbest questions I've ever asked, but, I will gladly admit my ignorance if it gains me an understanding:

 

What is the purpose of the vertical boards w/no top fastening between the molds?

 

Thanks -

 

AGITC

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Guy:

Those strips were added to help keep the planking aligned during gluing to reduce the need for fairing later. They are temporary and moved up as the planking moves up.

 

Gotcha - I've never strip-planked anything that big, but, the technique indeed makes sense! What are the bottom of those vertical boards fastened to - the first run of planks?

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