Jump to content

Dick Carter design boats


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 1.6k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

More pix of GITANA at Abeking & Rasmussen:

Hello all from Hamburg Germany i found this forum a couple of weeks ago and love it! i will present you our 50 year old Lady „ Anaïs“ formaly known as _ Apecist  _ Reata _ Ska

Repost - David Edwards taking ANGEL out for a spin (photo - Beken)

Posted Images

 

Sad news from the Ligurian Coast in NW Italy. Francesco reports that due to extreme, 10 meter waves breaching the breakwater at Rapallo Harbor, "the Carlo Riva Marina does not exist anymore and god only knows if it will ever be rebuilt; RABBIT was in Lavagna, at CARM, for some minor detailing following the restoration, so it was saved. Compared to what happened to other boats (SERAFINA, Swan 39 the design of which was derived from IMP that Skip knows perfectly, sunk, MY PASSION, moored on our same dock, and SEA WHIPPET, owned by our sailmaker, missing, other boats in pieces) our Carter 37 TOMIRA was lucky, she still floats and the repair work won’t be much, the major concern is to find berths for 2 boats in an area where 400 moorings disappeared and won’t be available for a time that no one can evaluate (if ever)."

 

https://www.boatinternational.com/yachts/news/storm-destroys-hundreds-of-yachts-in-rapallo--38669

Below, Francesco and Mietta's Carter 37 TOMIRA damaged, but afloat.  200 yachts in the Carlo Riva Marina were reportedly sunk.

TOMIRA.thumb.jpg.520e205489a867ed0d468faa2ab3e0fb.jpg

We send our very best to our dear friends who have suffered great loss.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A fun book with great stories and photos! Dick Carter's recollections of people, places, and events are encyclopedic.  Lesser known are DC's innovations such as Internal halyards and tangs.  He also had a halyard lock for his spinny, but that didn't work as well as hoped  Nor did the trim tab...  I loved reading this book and recommend it.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

Our friend WP recently spotted GITANA V in Long Beach, CA, and took some pix.

She was designed for Baron Edmund de Rothschild and built at A&R in 1971. One day in the early 1980s, my father got a call from the US Coast Guard, who informed him that GITANA had been seized off Southern California for smuggling drugs from South America, and that he could buy the boat at a federal auction if he so wished. 

Gitana_lr_1.jpg

Gitana_lr.jpg

photo-3_lr.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Catherine Carter said:

Our friend WP recently spotted GITANA V in Long Beach, CA, and took some pix.

She was designed for Baron Edmund de Rothschild and built at A&R in 1971. One day in the early 1980s, my father got a call from the US Coast Guard, who informed him that GITANA had been seized off Southern California for smuggling drugs from South America, and that he could buy the boat at a federal auction if he so wished. 

Gitana_lr_1.jpg

Gitana_lr.jpg

photo-3_lr.jpg

wow is that gorgeous!

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

We attended Dick’s presentation at the Falmouth (Ma) library yesterday. Sandy Weld in audience as well. Dick mostly covered highlights from his book. Fun that his earliest sailing experiences (northern end of Buzzards Bay) is where we sail now.   One anicdote from the Q&A session - in response to a question involving learning from one’s mistakes, Dick said his biggest failures were in navigation - sailing to the wrong mark because he didn’t read the SI’s carefully. Been there, done that. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

RED ROOSTER HAS BEEN FOUND!!!!!!!!

SHE'S ALIVE AND WELL IN THE PHILIPPINES, IN MANILA!!!

 

Her owner has made contact with my father. I'll post more details as I learn them. 


Photos of RR taken at Berthon after the 1969 Cowes-Dinard and before the Admiral's Cup. My father is in the foreground.

DickCarter_RedRooster_Berthonyard_1969_2.jpg

DickCarter_RedRooster_Berthonyard_Dad_1969_5.jpg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Catherine Carter said:

RED ROOSTER HAS BEEN FOUND!!!!!!!!

SHE'S ALIVE AND WELL IN THE PHILIPPINES, IN MANILA!!!

 

Good news indeed. Many have asked RED ROOSTER's whereabouts.  Her last owner of record, Davis Pillsbury of Newport Beach, CA, sold RR to 3 French bicycle entrepreneurs in 1975.  Since then, no confirmed sightings.  Can any Anarchists in Manila confirm RED ROO's current location?  Here's a photo of RR at Newport Harbor Yacht Club (CA) Opening Day in 1973.  Small world that DC and Bobby Monetti won the 1950 National Intercollegiate Championship for Yale in the last of 44 races finishing off the same NHYC docks as RED ROOSTER is tied to 23 years later...PS, if you didn't already know, it was Catherine C., age 7, who named RED ROOSTER.

red rooster 3.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

Hi there,

I just joined Sailing Anarchy and this is my first post! I have recently purchased a Carter Luna Offshore 50, yuhuuu!! And am very excited to connect with others interested in Carter boats. It's great that Catherine is on this forum and somewhat carries Dick's voice across to us. 

We bought the boat in Grenada and are currently cruising the Windward Islands, moving north at a leisurely pace. I do not know much about the Luna 50 and found little on the internet before buying the boat. It is a Staysail Schooner (as far as I understand) and carries 2 self tacking jibs. Sailing has been a breeze in the healthy Tradewinds, tacking is easy as and accidental jibes not a problem! I am still only learning to understand the boat and it's systems and there is a lot to get intimate with! 

I would love to know how many of these boats were built, and better yet if there are any current owners on the forum to chat to.

307479761_Fotoluna.jpg.96e2c0dc2aca6405ab0cc2bf1bfcb080.jpg 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

Credit where due: At age six, DC's daughter Catherine not only suggested RED ROOSTER's name, but also delivered a drawing, complete with red hull and black waterline stripe.  Said Catherine, “if you paint the boat red, you can call him RED ROOSTER!”

The only part of Catherine's color scheme DC nixed was the red mast..

It should be no surprise 50 years on that Catherine had a major hand in the publication of DC's new book In the Golden Age of Offshore Racing, including exhaustive research, editing, and restoration of the many classic photos.  Well done Catarina!

50 years?  Catherine, never one to miss details, recently asked the exact day and time of this week's 50th Anniversary of RED ROO winning the '69 Fastnet Race, becoming the Admiral's Cup high-point boat, and anchoring the American Admirals Cup Team of CARINA, PALAWAN, and RED ROOSTER to a come-from-behind victory over the heavily favored Aussie threesome of MERCEDES III, RAGAMUFFIN, and KOOMOOLOO. This USA AC win was not to be repeated for 28 years, 1997.

I had to think a bit and consult some record keeping...days, dates, and finish times don't always rise to memory's surface 50 years on.

I do remember motoring RED ROOSTER to the Royal Yacht Squadron start line on a Saturday after the traditional end of Cowes Weeks fireworks. According to a calendar, it must have been August 9, 1969. We had been up much of the night with broken winch gearing that had dropped the keel 6" into the tarmac at Groves and Gutteridges while doing a final bottom polish the afternoon before.

As we reached the RYS starting area just offshore, DC called the crew aft.  Instead of a short speech, DC reached into his sea bag and passed out 8 small jars of p-nut butter, and an apple each. Only 7 spoons could be found, and DC said, "we're going light."  "Hope you don't get hungry." End of speech.

Jim Hartvig Anderson then opened his sea bag and passed out crew shirts: white, Hanes, X-Large T-shirts on which he'd taken a felt tip pen and wrote RED ROOSTER's name on the front. Only problem, Jim was good at drawing boats in the Nahant Tower and had in fact drawn RED ROOSTER's lines. But English spelling was not his Danish strong point.  All our crew shirts said "RED ROOTER."

We reached Fastnet Rock in good shape and set the spinnaker for the DDW run to the Bishop Rock. The SW'erly freshened during the afternoon as predicted by the BBC for the Irish Sea. "Southwest 6, becoming 5 later," was the succinct forecast.

1032731619_REDROOSTER5.jpg.649d8f12f1813bb8e9619ee72a6fba3f.jpg

"This is gonna be good I thought."  DC was no shrinking violet when it came to fully retracting the keel, even with the suspect and recently repaired winch. "Dick," I said, "don't we want to leave a little keel down to help with steering?"

The answer came with no hesitation.  "All the way up!" "And remember, the trunk curtain is closed. Don't tear it."

(Without the fairing over the keel trunk's exit slot, a small window revealed washing machine agitation inside.  All we needed was adding laundry soap for our odoriferous clothing.) 

Off we surfed, riding 4-6' wind waves downwind, rolling rail-to-rail, but with never a round up or down. DC seemed pleased as he'd pop his head from the nav station through the companionway hatch.  Everyone aboard was happy we had a tiller as we slithered and slewed our way eastward. Billy, Taylor, Commodore, and I, the California contingent of ROOSTER's Fastnet crew, had a dozen or more Transpac races under our belts and these conditions in the Irish Sea seemed like home, minus the popcorn clouds and trade winds.

Between the Scillies and Plymouth, the breeze dropped as it usually does in the wee-night hours.  We just had to finish before the zephyrs quit altogether and the tide turned foul.

In the dawn gloaming, RED ROOSTER ghosted by the Plymouth Breakwater Lighthouse finish at 3:50 a.m., 4 days and 17 hours after our start. We felt pretty good about our overall chances. Of the three Aussie boats, only RAGS was tied up.  No MERCEDES nor KOOMOOLOO in view on our approach.

We were all pretty drained from the nite-fighting.  But not too tired to answer DC's request for a hoist aloft to retrieve the much despised racing flag lashed at the masthead. We secured our captain well in the bosun's chair. Just as well, as DC fell asleep at the masthead where he spent the morning napping above the hubbub below.

The Awards Ceremony was the next afternoon, Friday, August 15th, the official conclusion of the Fastnet and Admirals Cup.  DC had somehow got a cardboard box of 20 dozen Golden Cockerel lapel pin badges from the local Simpson's Brewery. Across the street was a hardware store where DC bought several cans of red spray paint. We spent the morning painting the golden cockerels red, and Dick Carter spent the rest of the day and into the afternoon's festivities at the Guild Hall graciously handing out RED ROOSTER pins to well wishers and smiling admirers along the docks and Plymouth streets.

In answer to Catherine's question,   If RR finished the Fastnet at 3:50 a.m.,Thursday DT, August 14th, 1969, the 50th Anniversary of RED ROOSTER winning the 1969 Fastnet is tonight, Tuesday night, August 13th, at 23:50 p.m. EDT.

189013847_RedRooster10.thumb.jpg.0b1eb5ce3106cae1871d9ac591542f49.jpg

Cock-a-doodle-doo! Break out the champagne, p-nut butter, and red apples. Congrats, Dick Carter and crew. RED ROOSTER was an amazing boat. And standby, there is more recently discovered news as to RR's history after her ownership in California and two Transpac Races.

Meanwhile, DC has become proud new owner of an "Oystercatcher" 14' catboat.  You may see him and grand kids sailing RABBIT III off Hospital Cove, Cataumet, Cape Cod.  It only draws 10" board up.RedRooster13.thumb.jpg.4f8d0da869b322b1ccb7f89f6d3d0d15.jpg

 

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you sleddog for your colorful, always entertaining write-ups, in this case, of the 1969 Fastnet Race, both here on SA and in my father's book. You were an invaluable part of RED ROOSTER's success, especially at the helm.

In early 1969, when I was 6, my father helped me carve a 12" LOA hull out of balsa wood. I spray painted it red, my favorite color. I knew Dad was having a new boat built and wanted to know its name. He mumbled something about how he liked naming his boats RABBIT. I told him, "well, if you paint your boat red, you can name it RED ROOSTER". And so he did, even though he had always loved white or navy blue for boats. And RABBIT III was scratched as a name. 

After RED ROOSTER won the 1969 Fastnet, our family cruised on Red Roo in the Golfe du Morbihan. In my sketch book, I drew our boat, albeit with a tree trunk-sized red spar and red standing rigging. If you're going to have a red boat, go all out.

Catherine_RedRoosterdrawing_1969.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night, I received an email from the current owner of RED ROOSTER, a Frenchman living in the Philippines. While we don't know when he bought the boat, or from whom, he was excited to detail his many cruising adventures aboard Red Roo, in rough chronological order: the Bahamas; Alicante (Spain); Narbonne in S. France to Paris via canals; Santa Lucia (West Indies), Greece; Bodrum (Turkey); Bahamas;  the South Pacific - Marquesas Islands, Tuamotu archipelago, New Caledonia, Opua, Brisbane, the Salomon Islands and finally, the Philippines.

We have a few undated photos of Red Roo and his French owner:

51895242_751891175194514_8914361393449271296_n.jpg

52489257_751891168527848_3843268145280188416_n.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Hello all from Hamburg Germany

i found this forum a couple of weeks ago and love it!

i will present you our 50 year old Lady „ Anaïs“ formaly known as

_ Apecist 

_ Reata

_ Skagarak

_ Svinga

we bought her 2016 - did a lot work by ourselves and the revit is still in prozess!

 Since 2016, we sail her during the summertime in the baltic sea and we are  fascinated about her potential.

know a couple of Fotos and greetings from germany !

 

 

 
,

0F483924-8D9F-4E6A-A131-671A2C51857B.jpeg

D1532D6D-A858-4C44-82C7-2C0F2B6E9FC6.jpeg

0DACBAF5-57AA-4192-B1F3-F6CE5B2E9BA9.jpeg

B8AE965F-4A9D-4B6B-B2C8-4DDCDAF071F4.jpeg

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/20/2019 at 6:50 PM, Anaiis226 said:

It s me again 

I forgot some details 

built at Abeking&Rasmussen, 1969, G226, hull material wood , she raced 1969 at the one ton cup in Helgoland.

Good looking Optimist.

Many moons ago when I was 16 I built the Graupner model with all the remote control gizmo's.

I still have it but looking a bit sorry for itself and the electronics are toast.  That'll be my retirement project :-)

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/20/2019 at 7:37 PM, Anaiis226 said:

Hello all from Hamburg Germany

i found this forum a couple of weeks ago and love it!

i will present you our 50 year old Lady „ Anaïs“ formaly known as

_ Apecist 

_ Reata

_ Skagarak

_ Svinga

we bought her 2016 - did a lot work by ourselves and the revit is still in prozess!

 Since 2016, we sail her during the summertime in the baltic sea and we are  fascinated about her potential.

know a couple of Fotos and greetings from germany !

 

 


 

,

0F483924-8D9F-4E6A-A131-671A2C51857B.jpeg

D1532D6D-A858-4C44-82C7-2C0F2B6E9FC6.jpeg

0DACBAF5-57AA-4192-B1F3-F6CE5B2E9BA9.jpeg

B8AE965F-4A9D-4B6B-B2C8-4DDCDAF071F4.jpeg

Thanks. Lucky you. You keep her on Lake Baltic or will she see proper sea any time soon? Anyhow, I love it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/29/2019 at 4:57 AM, Anaiis226 said:
 
I also have such a project in our basement …;)

A04C090A-69AF-4556-8050-25C6CB7A7D25.jpeg

Unusually, for once I think that it can be comfortably agreed that the winch has been overspecc'ed for the intended use.......

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
  • 4 months later...

Bambooboat,

I hope I can answer a few of your questions. 

To the best of my knowledge, there were nine Luna 50s built in Italy in the late 70s. Of the nine, I believe eight were built as three cabin versions, with the owner's cabin aft and the galley on the port side beneath the cockpit and across an island (engine below) from the Nav station. These boats had two smaller cabins and a small head forward. They were all rigged with what Alga Offshore (the company that had the boats built in Italy with Dick's hull design) termed the Luna Rig, IE equal height masts and no booms, only roller furling. BTW Your boat shows a triatic but mine never had one. We had twin rollers on the Fwd/Mizzen mast. 

One hull was built as a custom boat for Jack Setton (yes,  that Jack Setton) with a different interior layout. This Luna 50 was designed differently by Giancarlo Andolfi , the owner of Alga Offshore in Milan. The original large galley area became an enclosed, walk-in engine room with every mechanical device on shelves for easy access. The original engine was a Mercedes OM-617, 5 cyl. 
The Fwd area with the two cabins and the head were instead designed as a single, large owner's cabin with a large centerline queen bed, a huge head with full-sized bathtub and shower. The small galley was located on the stbd side, just forward of the main salon and before the door to the owner's cabin. The boat interior was decorated by Carlo Pagani, the decorator of Riva, who had designed the interior of the Riva that Jack owned at the time.

I bought Jack's Luna, then named Luna de France, in 1982 when she was in Port de La Rague just west of Cannes, tied up between Jack's beautiful Riva and his other crazy sailboat they were just finishing, his Pioneer with twin outboards!
I changed her French registration to USA Documentation, renamed her Thunderchild, and we sailed the Med, based out of Antibes and Puerto Banus, for three years. My wife Victoria and I cruised for a month with Giancarlo and his girlfriend Milena from France to Corsica and  Sardinia where they left and we continued on to Spain.

I brought her back to Ft Lauderdale in 1985 to be my perfect boat for the Bahamas with her lift keel since I had previously spent three years cruising all around the Bahamas in an Irwin 52 with 6' 3" draft. The lift keel and retractable rudder were the ultimate E-ticket in shoal areas. NO ONE could go where we could!!! 

I sold her in 1990 in Ft Lauderdale. Last I heard she was named SEAQUENE and I believe she was a Canadian Flagged boat (I could be wrong about the flag).

If you PM me I can give you a bit more info and some pics of what they all looked like (on deck at any rate, since mine was the oddball of the nine) . I also have the full-color, heavy stock, brochure tat Jack had printed just to sell Luna de France. 
I'll attach a pic of her from 1984 at anchor, for a lunch and photo stop, in Isles de Lavezzi, Corsica, on our way to Sardinia, then on to Spain and eventually back home ....

Best,

Doug Peterson 
(no, not that Doug Peterson;-)

1538333624_ThunderchildatIslesdeLavezziCorsica1985.thumb.jpg.a625a61490d1005bf9da126f387c0dbe.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Doug that's great to hear from you and learn a bit from you and your story! Love to see the photo you posted and would love to see more! I will PM you.

One question you might know the answer to: can you recall the boat displacement and the mass/weight of the keel? I have conflicting information. When I last hauled out the Travel-lift weight gauge read near 19,000 Kg. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

RACING IN THE SEA: EPIC HISTORY, PORTRAITS, CULTURES AND EVENTS

"Then the evolution will come from Dick CARTER who by winning the Fastnet, traditional stage of the Admiral’s Cup whose objective is to promote international competition, is raised to the rank of geniuses of naval architecture. Indeed, her sailboat mixes intuition and innovative ideas at odds with existing sailboats".

 

RACING IN THE SEA.docx

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Bambooboat said:

Doug that's great to hear from you and learn a bit from you and your story! Love to see the photo you posted and would love to see more! I will PM you.

One question you might know the answer to: can you recall the boat displacement and the mass/weight of the keel? I have conflicting information. When I last hauled out the Travel-lift weight gauge read near 19,000 Kg. 

Hi Ernesto,

Originally, as per my brochure at least, the total displacement was 12,000kg. The "centerboard" as it is called was listed as 5 Tons. It does not say metric tones. so: Your mileage may vary! <G>

I'll PM you a link to a dropbox folder so you can download the brochure. It's a big file!
Doug

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 months later...
2 hours ago, mhmvisser said:

She is now called Talia and you can find her in Schokkershaven Marina. 

IMG-20201008-WA0000.jpg

Looks like "Italia" to me.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 weeks later...
2 hours ago, Catherine Carter said:

From my family's cruise on Red Rooster in the Morbihan after the '69 Admiral's Cup. Sandy Weld came along too. Poor guy was stuck on board with my parents, our au pair Debby, and 4 kids under the age of 7! Second pic is sailing into Vannes, where Red Rooster later appeared on a postcard. 

FamilyCruise_RedRooster_GolfeduMorbihan_19_Aug-1969.jpg

 

 

You were beautiful babies.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Thanks to Ben Edwards for sending along build photos of his father David Edwards' boat ANGEL. As discussed earlier in the thread, David Edwards told my father he wanted a "Tina, but 10% smaller". ANGEL was 33' LOA and built in wood at the Tucker Browns yard in Burnham (England) in 1968. There's a wonderful stillness and timeless beauty to the black and white photos in particular. 

Angel build_1.jpg

Angel build_2.jpg

 

 

Angel build_3.jpg

Angel_build_TuckerBrowns 4.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 weeks later...

Correct me if I am wrong, but I remember Mabelle in the seventies - she had the first halyard clutch system I had ever seen. The halyards exited the mast inside the coachroof and traveled horizontally just under the ceiling, before exiting through the posterior wall. There were some rings with captive steel balls which held the halyards, after being winched in from the cockpit. I was a very crude system, and the halyards only could be freed after tensioning them a great deal, but it worked. 

In recent pictures of Mabelle I saw that this system had been removed, with the winches relocated on the mast, as it was usual in those days. I don't think the clutch system lasted for a long time, as it was difficult to use and moreover the boat interior was always damp. I don't know if this was Carter's design. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/24/2020 at 5:31 AM, Catherine Carter said:

From my family's cruise on Red Rooster in the Morbihan after the '69 Admiral's Cup. Sandy Weld came along too. Poor guy was stuck on board with my parents, our au pair Debby, and 4 kids under the age of 7! Second pic is sailing into Vannes, where Red Rooster later appeared on a postcard. 

FamilyCruise_RedRooster_GolfeduMorbihan_19_Aug-1969.jpg

FamilyCruise_RedRooster_GolfeduMorbihan_Vannes_7_Aug-1969.jpg

Red_Rooster_Vannes_GolfeduMorbihan_1969.jpg

Is red rooster still around?

There was a page about her in the Glenans course book and I remember spending lot of time dreaming about the boat as a kid.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/14/2021 at 7:05 PM, kotick said:

Correct me if I am wrong, but I remember Mabelle in the seventies - she had the first halyard clutch system I had ever seen. The halyards exited the mast inside the coachroof and traveled horizontally just under the ceiling, before exiting through the posterior wall. There were some rings with captive steel balls which held the halyards, after being winched in from the cockpit. I was a very crude system, and the halyards only could be freed after tensioning them a great deal, but it worked. 

In recent pictures of Mabelle I saw that this system had been removed, with the winches relocated on the mast, as it was usual in those days. I don't think the clutch system lasted for a long time, as it was difficult to use and moreover the boat interior was always damp. I don't know if this was Carter's design. 

Mabelle is a Carter design. Built by Sangermani. I was her skipper for the 1973 Italian Admiral's Cup team.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/15/2021 at 1:05 AM, kotick said:

Correct me if I am wrong, but I remember Mabelle in the seventies - she had the first halyard clutch system I had ever seen. The halyards exited the mast inside the coachroof and traveled horizontally just under the ceiling, before exiting through the posterior wall. There were some rings with captive steel balls which held the halyards, after being winched in from the cockpit. I was a very crude system, and the halyards only could be freed after tensioning them a great deal, but it worked. 

In recent pictures of Mabelle I saw that this system had been removed, with the winches relocated on the mast, as it was usual in those days. I don't think the clutch system lasted for a long time, as it was difficult to use and moreover the boat interior was always damp. I don't know if this was Carter's design. 

Frigate/Ydra system?

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Tanton Y_M said:

Mabelle is a Carter design. Built by Sangermani. I was her skipper for the 1973 Italian Admiral's Cup team.

 

Yes, of course! I was referring to the halyard clutch system. I don't know if Frigate or Ydra also had this device.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lest we forget, Carter was also in love with roller reefing mainsails!

Yuck!

But...

Pictures of them in use show that his boats that Carter raced were more adept at using roller reefing effectively than any other photos I've seen.

Question: when properly deployed as Dick was able to do, might roller reefing be less punishing on mainsail cloth than slab reefing?

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/18/2021 at 10:59 PM, Somebody Else said:

Question: when properly deployed as Dick was able to do, might roller reefing be less punishing on mainsail cloth than slab reefing?

Can you imagine the effect of one of one of these vang claws on a rolled laminate sail?

Snap, crackle, and pop.  With added crunch

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mainsails were small back then, shortening sail was mainly done by changing jibs, so main reefing was less important than it is now. But I remember these roller systems as a devilish contraption... 

Link to post
Share on other sites