Jump to content

Opinions Please,


JimB

Recommended Posts

I have not seen the boat I am purchasing in person. My partner had a look at it and reported some minor cracking in the gelcoat around the keel/hull joint. The seller reported to me that this was minor and would fix it.I expected they would find the keel bolts under tourqed which was the case and probably the cause, no big deal. The final bill has been calculated and along with some other minor work the labor came to 10 hours. Alarm bells are going off in my head as I would not think the work would amount to more than 3 hours unless there was more damage than I was expecting. The rest of the hull and keel looks great and I find it hard to believe the boat would have suffered a grounding, the keel repaired but not the keel / hull joint area. I am still thinking loose keel boats as the probable cause. Any other opinions? I have attached pics of the repaired hull but did not see any of the before which I wish I had now. My bad.

post-323-010003400 1304817193_thumb.jpg

post-323-023445400 1304817224_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Every yacht I've had with a deep draft/bulbed keel (TP52, SYD40, BHH36) with alot of weight in the bulb has had cracking around the keel/hull joint. It is only bog that is cracking (i.e. filler between the keel flange and the hull itself) and you will only have to maintain this every year.

 

If you walk around a large yard you will see the same cracking on Mumm30, Farr40 and many others with bulbed keels. I wouldn't worry too much about it. However, if this is not a bulbed keel you might want to have a surveyor check it out.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no sump. The keel is bolted directly to the hull. Cracking around the seam is going to be a fact of life...

 

Check the area inside the boat where the interior liner and the hull come together around the keel bolts. The boats were built relatively well but they are all getting on in age. There will be some degradation.

 

If you are making a purchase I strongly suggest you find a marine surveyor to have a critical, and objective, look over any areas you may have questions about.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Use a flathead screwdriver with a hammer to lightly chip away around the crack and either side.. Use West systems g-flex to give the area some flexibility. Common problem. Don't overtighten the keel bolts, or you will have a problem when you strip or break them. I agree to pay a surveyor (not related to the seller).

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no sump. The keel is bolted directly to the hull. Cracking around the seam is going to be a fact of life...

 

Check the area inside the boat where the interior liner and the hull come together around the keel bolts. The boats were built relatively well but they are all getting on in age. There will be some degradation.

 

If you are making a purchase I strongly suggest you find a marine surveyor to have a critical, and objective, look over any areas you may have questions about.

 

Winner winner, chicken dinner. Find a surveryor from a different brokerage/yard that doesn't know the seller personally and have them look at it. From the picture, there is no sump, which is to your advantage, but the cracking only means that you'll have to yearly fix it up by filling it with that nasty white stuff we all love and just accept the fact that all boats need work.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no sump. The keel is bolted directly to the hull. Cracking around the seam is going to be a fact of life...

 

Check the area inside the boat where the interior liner and the hull come together around the keel bolts. The boats were built relatively well but they are all getting on in age. There will be some degradation.

 

If you are making a purchase I strongly suggest you find a marine surveyor to have a critical, and objective, look over any areas you may have questions about.

 

Winner winner, chicken dinner. Find a surveryor from a different brokerage/yard that doesn't know the seller personally and have them look at it. From the picture, there is no sump, which is to your advantage, but the cracking only means that you'll have to yearly fix it up by filling it with that nasty white stuff we all love and just accept the fact that all boats need work.

Err Nice Avatar!

 

I'll 3rd it. Get a surveyor (from anywhere but one that they refer....use the Yellow Pages)and have him do a complete Survey with mositure meter looking for delamination. Every boat has water in it, nature of the beast but look for the Delamination.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...