Jump to content

B.Chance Jr design boats


chorus1

Recommended Posts

So I have to tell a pretty funny Mariner story. No Britt involved, but funny none the less.

 

I'm not sure if Mariner was built at Derecktor's in Mamaroneck or not but a Friday afternoon in the spring of 1974 it was sitting in the water there, I think just launched, no mast, just the hull. A friend of mine was doing the Block Island Race that weekend and Derecktor's was popping a bunch of pretty large boats in the water to do the race. The crane (that huge thing that overpowered the local skyline) was picking up boats and then dropping them in as easy as you can imagine. The one issue was that a huge steel fishing boat (which I assume Derecktor had built) was on the dock where the boats were going in, the crane just picked them up and hoisted them over the fishing trawler, dropping them on the other side. In this set up, the crane operator couldn't actually see the hook after the boat was launched, he just cranked it up and went to the next boat. All the boats were going in with straps, and the straps stayed on the hook.

 

Mariner was on a dock that was barely its' length, 90 degrees to the trawler and pretty tucked into it's spot, such that the stern was under the overhang of the bow of the trawler. We had walked over and checked it out and then gone to the other side of the basin to watch the boats going in. After depositing a rather large boat in the water, the crane operator went through his routine of starting to lift the hook to pluck the next boat. However, on this hoist the hook caught under the railing of the trawler and as the crane operator put more power into it, the trawler's bow started lifting up. Right about this time we hear a ruckus and here comes Ted Turner, yakking up a storm with a bunch of journalists in tow who were writing down everything he had to say. They were oblivious to the situation, Turner was in full rant as he led the group down a ramp near the bow, no one even looking at the boat.

 

We looked back at the trawler, which was now about 8' out of the water over the transom of the 12. We looked at each other, then at the trawler, then at the 12, then at Turner. No one in the shipyard saw any of this except us. I was just about to say "Do you think we should tell someone what's going on?" when Turner turned to show off his boat, immediately seeing the situation (a gazillion pound trawler perched over the stern of his brand new 12) and screamed the most god awful howl you can imagine. At almost the same split second, the railing ripped off the fishing boat and it came slamming down. A couple inches the wrong way and the transom of the 12 would have been sheered off but as (bad?) luck would have it, the angle of the bow rise was just enough that the side of the bow came down exactly on the angle of the transom. The force from the crash shoved Mariner forward, ripping the dock cleats off and pushing it 6-10' up on the dock in front of it. The boat slowly slid backwards back into the water and just sat there, looking very much like the hulk I saw of it some 10-12 years later when it was sitting on a mooring in Manhasset harbor. Turner exploded, screaming at anyone in sight that they'd ruined his 12. The journalists just stood there with slack jaws. My buddy (Ken Legler, coach of Tufts) and I just stood there howling in laughter while shipyard workers came flying out of every corner of the place like cockroaches in the sun. Damage to the boat was minimal, amazingly, just a huge crease in the transom that was, I guess, fixed pretty quickly. Hilarious.

She was built at Derecktors. I had never heard that story. I Bet they got that fixed in a real hurry. Talk about snakebit.
Link to post
Share on other sites

I think there were 3 board boats at Vic that year: Sachem, Pendragon, and the infamous Riotous Assembly. Unballasted board boats had been using a bit of a loophole in the rule that allowed them to have about 2-3 feet of unrated additional draft over the keelers and the loophole was subsequently closed. Not sure why designers hadn't picked up on that before, but I'd guess they thought a boat without any ballast in the keel/board would have to be too beamy to work. Of course, prior to this, Bruce King used the same basic loophole with the very beamyTerrorist by employing bilge boards which were then effectively banned (rating penalties), although the unrated draft loophole for single board boats (since they didn't want to penalize traditional American centre board boats) continued to exist until 1979 or thereabouts.

 

Wasn't Sachem nicknamed "The Flying Salad Bowl"?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 9 months later...

Does anyone here have any info on the Chance Offshore One? There's a boat for sale here as a Morgan 33T that definitely isn't that and it has been suggested it's actually the Chance. Can't find anything but vague references on the net and I probably have the info in my old mags in the basement but that could take days to look through - hoping someone here has some quick access - pics, specs etc.

 

Anybody?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I sailed a Chance PT-30 in '79-80. It had a Peterson Ganbare keel put on and been heavily bumped a few years prior. Drew almost 7'. Fast as a witch upwind, slow as a square-backed turd reaching, and positively terrifying downwind.

 

Mariner was a pig, but Chance designed several very succesful 5.5 Meters prior, so its not like he was unfamiliar with the Meter Rule. He definately went way out on a limb.... could be he was asked to, weren't going to beat S&S by copying them.

 

I always thought Equation was pretty badass.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob, I'm far from being an expert on the 12s, but the results (or lack thereof) kind of spoke for themselves.

Probably a better example of unrealized potential would be Heritage in 1970. They simply arrived in Newport much too late, with a raw crew and poor sails. And although Charley Morgan is an accomplished offshore and one-design sailor, he had no experience in 12s, and very little match-racing experience. THAT boat was much faster than their results indicated.

 

Just to add to the Chance/Turner stories:

At the SORC following the AC, Chance and Turner crossed paths inside the SPYC. Within seconds, fists were flying. A block away, at the old Bayfront Center Auditorium, was a large marquee sign promoting an upcoming boxing event. Overnight, someone added to the top of the marquee, "Turner vs. Chance". Fucking hysterical!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Brit was an amazing and extremely complex person. Very, very bright, but given to immense - almost irrational- technical risk taking. Filled with confidence, but as shy a person as I ever met. An amazing eye for hull form, but color blind to aesthetics in my book.

 

It was an amazing experience to work with him.

 

Karl

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Chance 54 Glory was sailing before 1983. I know it sailed Vic-Maui and Clipper Cup in 1982. IIRC Glory had steering issues during Vic-Maui 1980 and diverted to San Francisco.

 

Blackbeard

Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone here have any info on the Chance Offshore One? There's a boat for sale here as a Morgan 33T that definitely isn't that and it has been suggested it's actually the Chance. Can't find anything but vague references on the net and I probably have the info in my old mags in the basement but that could take days to look through - hoping someone here has some quick access - pics, specs etc.

 

Anybody?

There was a Belgian Chance design in Breskens (Netherlands) in the mid 70's, slim, low freeboard, over canvassed and highly rated for it's L.O.A.

IIRC the owner was working on oil rigs and had bought the hull in the U.S to complete it in Europe.

 

Looked pretty much like this: http://www.boats4sale.pro/detail/us/ndUPdmOdmPOmUUPnCnmU/75-33-Britton-Chance-Off-Shore-One-by-C-C-Yachts-Yanm actually.

Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/18/sports/britton-chance-jr-designer-of-americas-cup-boats-dies-at-72.html?_r=0

 

New York Times, October 18, 2012
Britton Chance Jr., Designer of America’s Cup Boats, Dies at 72
Britton Chance Jr., an innovative yacht designer for three America’s Cup winners, died on Oct. 12 in Branford, Conn. He was 72.
The cause was complications of a stroke, his sister Jan Chance O’Malley said.
As a designer, Mr. Chance was known for having a mathematician’s precision and a renegade’s willingness to experiment; he developed, for example, a retractable keel that reduced the drag on a boat headed downwind.
“He was one of the biggest innovators of the 1970s and ’80s,” said Jonathan Wright, a friend who was a crew member on many of Mr. Chance’s boats, including Stars and Stripes, which was captained by Dennis Conner. In 1987, that boat reclaimed the America’s Cup for the United States after its 132-year winning streak had been interrupted by an Australian victory four years earlier.
Mr. Chance, who came from a sailing and scientific family — his father, a leading biophysicist, was also an Olympic yachtsman — made a controversial entrance into the high-stakes and highly nationalistic world of the Cup. In 1967, the yacht Intrepid captured the Cup for the New York Yacht Club, and Mr. Chance was subsequently hired to design a so-called trial horse — a development boat to test design elements — for a French team that was preparing to challenge Intrepid in 1970.
Criticized by some for bringing American know-how to a foreign team, Mr. Chance said at the time that he hoped to use the experience to help him build an even better boat for the United States.
Indeed, though the French did not succeed — the 1970 challenger was Australian — Mr. Chance was subsequently hired to help improve the performance of Intrepid. He lengthened the waterline, the length of the boat that has contact with the water, and it won the America’s Cup again.
“Britt was commissioned by Bill Ficker, who captained the 1970 Intrepid,” Mr. Wright said in a recent interview. “He made the boat fuller in the stern, making the waterline longer by increasing the buoyancy in the back of the boat.”
In 1988 a New Zealand team, exploiting a loophole in the America’s Cup rules, declared a challenge with a 90-foot boat that dwarfed those in the Cup’s traditional 12-meter class. The result was a bit of a farce; in response, Mr. Conner countered with a smaller, swifter catamaran, designed partly by Mr. Chance, and the Cup races were conducted between two entirely different styles of boats.
The Americans won easily, and legal action ensued. The courts eventually kept the Cup with the Americans, and for succeeding competitions a new class of boat, the America’s Cup class, was defined, ensuring that a similar fiasco would not occur again.
Mr. Chance was born in Philadelphia on June 12, 1940, and grew up in Mantoloking, N.J., on Barnegat Bay, where he spent much of his childhood on the water.
He studied physics at the University of Rochester and mathematics at Columbia. Though he later taught classes in naval architecture and engineering at Yale, Wesleyan and Trinity, he never earned a college degree. He dropped out to work with the boat designers Ray Hunt and Ted Hood.
In addition to his work on America’s Cup yachts, he was the president of Chance & Company, a naval architecture firm in Essex, Conn.; he designed rowing sculls and sailboats in the 5.5-meter class that raced in the Olympics.
Mr. Chance, who lived in Lyme, Conn., was married and divorced twice. In addition to his sister Ms. O’Malley, he is survived by his mother, Jane Earle Lindemayer; a daughter, Tamsin Chance Blue; another sister, Eleanor Chance Burgess; a brother, Peter Earle Chance; four stepsiblings; and five half siblings.
An accomplished sailor, Mr. Chance competed in the America’s Cup trials and the Olympic trials, but that was not where his passion was.
“It’s nice out there,” he said when asked why he liked ocean sailing. But his main interest was in creating speed.
“He was a good skipper,” his father told Sports Illustrated in 1970, “but basically, he always wanted to know why the boat was going fast or slow and what he could do to make her go faster. He’s been that way from the beginning.”
Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob, I'm far from being an expert on the 12s, but the results (or lack thereof) kind of spoke for themselves.

Probably a better example of unrealized potential would be Heritage in 1970. They simply arrived in Newport much too late, with a raw crew and poor sails. And although Charley Morgan is an accomplished offshore and one-design sailor, he had no experience in 12s, and very little match-racing experience. THAT boat was much faster than their results indicated.

 

Just to add to the Chance/Turner stories:

At the SORC following the AC, Chance and Turner crossed paths inside the SPYC. Within seconds, fists were flying. A block away, at the old Bayfront Center Auditorium, was a large marquee sign promoting an upcoming boxing event. Overnight, someone added to the top of the marquee, "Turner vs. Chance". Fucking hysterical!

 

I have a video on the 1970 AC featuring Charley and Heritage. Watching it you get a comparison of an experienced 12m team in Intrepid and a first time crew with Heritage. It is night and day, Brit working on mods to Intrepid and Charley doing it all on Heritage: designing, tank testing, getting a late start on building the boat, driving, having a hard time getting the keel out of the mold, almost droppng her on the seawall when the crane over-balances, breaking a runner on the first sail on Tampa Bay, late departure/arrival on her own bottom to NY, missing the warinig gun on the first start, etc. (sorry, got carried away) Charley was just stretched too thin. And it comes through in the vid.

 

Most thought Intrepid was slower than in '67. The BC mods were removed in '74 and her being close to Courageous in speed, and Mariner not being in the ballpark speed-wise, seem to point to him going into a corner of the 12m rule that did not produce the results.(along with deceptive tank test results) DC made a comment about BC that he had 10 ideas on boat design but did not know which was bad and which were pure genius. (or something to that effect) But he wanted BC's creative mind on his design team. His fast boats like Equation and the success with S&S 87 point to him being a great NA mind, but with such creativity a few bad ones are going to happen from time-to-time. If he had the current day VPP tools at his disposal there is no telling what he may have come-up with.

 

So no slam on BC, but Mariner was not quite right.

 

edit: And just like Charley wanted Heritage has had a great post AC life, once she was rescued, and has been a successful boat on the Great Lakes. We saw her tied-up to the docks next to the Coast Guard in '73 in poor shape, rigging and a 55gal drum rusting away on her deck. Great that she is still sailing and is taken care-of.

Link to post
Share on other sites

92:

I don't doubt that MARINER was "not quite right". But, as you point out, MARINER had numerous Chancian "creative" features and I was never convinced that the stern treatment was the only culprit in the failure of that boat. Perhaps it was, perhaps not. But either way, I had met Britt a coupe of times and I liked him and I have always admired his unique approach to design. It was sad to see one boat bring down his career like that. The good thing about this thread is that it reminds us of all the highly successful boats he did. Bill Buchan's 3/4 tonner was a rocket and a very attractive looking boat.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was at Heritage's lauching, when the boat was almost dropped on Charley and family below. Sickening sight.

There were all kinds of delays in the build, starting with delay getting all the cedar planking stock. It had to be carefully selected, due to the bright finish. Mid-seventies, I used to sail on a custom Morgan 1-ton helmed by champion Snipe

sailor Francis Seavy... he was foreman in charge of the building of Heritage. Heard much of the story from him. Sidenote: Also on that 1-ton crew during the SORC was a young Warren Luhrs.

Dinghy sailor/coach Larry Suter was a trimmer on Intrepid in 1970. He agrees the boat was slower than in 1967, but there were other mods done besides the stern, so its tough to point a finger at any single one as the culprit. He agrees Heritage was probably faster, but very raw crew.

Not so well known is that when Turner Acquired Courageous for the '77 Cup, the boat was remeasured and found to be under the declared displacement from the '74 measurement certificate. Maybe some trim ballast simply went missing during the intervening years. But maybe Intrepid was the REAL winner of the '74 trials. Who knows? Its a mystery not likely to be solved.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I have seen a bow shot of Mariner somewhere that shows it had a very similar 'breast' at the forward waterline to the one that was used on S&S 87. This would show, as you say, that there were pieces of good design in Mariner, but the whole did not make a great 12m. From what I have seen and heard it was 'his' boat, and there became a wedge between he, Turner, DC, and the sailing team.

 

I am not sure it brought down his career, but it left a mark in the AC design game. My understanding is that the tank test data made the design look like a breakthrough, but the full size boat did not perform as tested. Although it lead to a distrust of the tank, which the Aussies used to their advantage, it did in the end teach NA's how to use the tank and the data it produced. The S&S 87 program restored his stature in my opinion, even though under the 'Ranger Agreement' that the design team signed. He made significant contributions in the keel design and structure, along with working on the computer VPP development with Nelson and Pedrick. S&S' keel was somewhat different than what the other teams were doing, with someone commenting that the wings looked like DC's daughter designed them.

 

Remember that Valiant was quite a dog out of the great S&S design house in 1970. Everybody has their 'bad one' in the lot. I always like the widely separated tall mizzen ketches that he drew, with the canting mizzenmast, to move it out somewhat from the shadow of the main.

 

I got to see her one time behind a house on Folly Beach, SC before she was finished and eventually sank off of Florida. Driving by the first time I saw this large red boat and thought that it looked like a 12m. Went back later and sure enough it was her. This was 1994 during the Sunfish NA's that year in Charleston.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob, Chance designed a rather conventional 12 for the French to use as a trial horse in the '70 Cup. It was considered to be a pretty fast boat, they were unable to use it during the challenger trials since they didn't design it themselves. I'm not sure why he took such a radical departure with Mariner just a few years later. As I suggested upthread, perhaps he was told to take a flyer? That's the approach the Australians used successfully a decade later. IDK. Agree with you that Chance was quite a smart and successful designer, and his career shouldn't be defined by Mariner alone.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hootie Hoo, I'd love to see that video sometime. There's tons more Heritage stories likely not known. Charley was actively racing Stars at the time, and put an ultra-bendy Starish mast on Heritage (later adopted by other 12s). He tried to buy sailcloth from Hood, but they wouldn't sell it to him, so he was forced to use some inferior

cloth which caused problems. Late in the trials, he obtained some Hood sails, but there wasn't testing time available, and they only used them the last few races before being eliminated.

John Dudinsky (IIRC he was on the delivery crew to Newport) has some funny stories about machining the trim tab stock at JTR. The trim tab was lead and weighed several tons. Several forklifts had to be borrowed to lift and position it so the stock could be milled. As I recall, it was supposed to be machined prior to casting. It was borrowed for a test-fit, lead was being poured, so they went ahead and cast it into the trim tab prior to the final maching being done. Sounds like Johnny was pulling his hair out over that snafu.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe Courageous was found to be under her declared displacement and that the S&S office, much to Olin's chagrin, acknowledged that they had made in error in the computations done from the lines. The discrepancy was discovered by Ted Hood when he was reworking Courageous as what he expected to be his trial horse, but which turned and bit him.

 

We may never know the full answer about what forces induced Brit to experiment with Mariner, but I worked with Brit to perform full scale towing tests on Valiant before Mariner was designed, and they made it clear the smaller scale Valiant models did not correctly predict the full- scale resistance of the yacht.

 

Designers must always face the trade-off of wanting to make a breakthrough at some risk and different ones have handle that differently - some opting for slow steady methodical improvement as Olin often seemed to do. It is sort of a variation of sailing to the layline; big potential gains if you are right, and the risk of terrible losses if you do not. Brit seemed by nature to be a "corner slammer".

 

As has been said, Mariner was but one data point in evaluating Brits accomplishments. I suspect it has taken on undue prominence because he was quite publicly challenging the status quo.

 

Karl

Link to post
Share on other sites

I sailed a Chance PT-30 in '79-80. It had a Peterson Ganbare keel put on and been heavily bumped a few years prior. Drew almost 7'. Fast as a witch upwind, slow as a square-backed turd reaching, and positively terrifying downwind.

 

Mariner was a pig, but Chance designed several very succesful 5.5 Meters prior, so its not like he was unfamiliar with the Meter Rule. He definately went way out on a limb.... could be he was asked to, weren't going to beat S&S by copying them.

 

I always thought Equation was pretty badass.

Sorta looks like she is leaping out of the water....

 

equation.jpg

 

getImage.gif?ID=100000488

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hootie, I'll look it up. I very well might be in it! I was 13 at the time, working for John Holmes doing the lofting and building the plug for Atalanta. He took me with his family to see the initial launch attempt... we were right up front, maybe 50' from the cranes.

As a sidestory... the boat was launched at Bayboro Harbour, right where the marina is now. Before the Interstate, the shortcut to the waterfront district from the south was to head east on 54th Ave S after the Skyway, and then N up 4th St.... right through the 'hood. It was dark when we headed back home, John was hauling ass down 4th St to get through the 'hood as quickly as possible. Not fast enough... some thugs tossed a cinderblock through the windshield of John's Mercedes. Had to stop on US 19 before Skyway to knock out some of the shattered glass to see to drive.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Per Olin Stephens' autobiography, the displacement calculation error was due to a programming error. The program had been used for all S&S boats for quite a number of years. I forget if he says this, but my impression was that the area of the last station had the wrong Simpson's Rule multiplier. There's not much area there, and obviously, the error was not detected by checking the the actual waterline against the design, as is done with Twelves. OS was horrified.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting that we are talking about Charley and Heritage. Found this today in the DIYC Log, they host the Hospice Cup and Morgan Invasion together and Charley came to give a talk recently. I wished I had been there. Wonder if we could arrange another talk?

post-14813-0-74517200-1409424657_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny Charley story:

When I was working for Glen on the SR27, Charley used to stop by regularly. One day, Glen asked me to router out the core where the keel trunk was to go. I looked at the plans, looked at the hull, looked at the plans, looked at the hull.... something didn't seem right. Glen goes "gimmie that" (the router), jumps in the hull, and routers out the core. Looked right, but that eve we found it was too aft a station, and had to router fwd another couple of feet. This left a small basin just aft the keel on the inside of boat. Since it was at the deepest part of hull, we rationalized it would make a good "bilge sump" for water to collect making it easier to sponge out.

A couple days later, Charley stops by, and asks WTF is the small basin behind the keel for. Glen launches into the prepared explanation about the little mini-sump and making it easier to bail, etc. Charley listens patiently. When Glen finishes, Charley nods his head and says "You fucked up, didn't you?" LOL, no pulling the wool over his eyes!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I imagine not - how many people were such total sailors? Design, build & sail his own boats that he also built the sails for? And all at the highest levels while also building and running a major boat manufacturing operation and getting rich as hell. I've known some pretty capable and multi-talented people but never anyone near that good.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Chance 54 Glory was sailing before 1983. I know it sailed Vic-Maui and Clipper Cup in 1982. IIRC Glory had steering issues during Vic-Maui 1980 and diverted to San Francisco.

 

Blackbeard

Glory had two kind of steering issues:

 

It had absolutely no directional stability downwind in surfing conditions in its first configuration, until the keel was moved aft. Had a huge IOR flat spot under the bow with "chines" each side of the flat and a keel way forward. You'd start down a wave and the boat would crab down the wave face in the direction of its choosing. Very exciting for the driver.

 

Then it bent the rudder shaft about 400 miles off San Francisco, split open the rudder shell and sailed in only able to steer right and use sails to go left. A three day broach fest getting into the bay.

 

A very weird boat. Had a sticky spot at 4 knots where the transom just sucked up the ocean till speed jumped up to 6.

 

Apparently last seen rotting in Mexico.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I met Charlie about 20 years ago at the Nap show. He toured one of my boats and as he left he looked over at me and said "God bless you Bob".

I had the weird feeling I had just been Papally anointed. "Holy shit! Charley Morgan just interceded with God for me!" I have it made in the shade.

Since then I have always had a nice feeling about Charley. He certainly has been one of my heroes for many years.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe Courageous was found to be under her declared displacement and that the S&S office, much to Olin's chagrin, acknowledged that they had made in error in the computations done from the lines. The discrepancy was discovered by Ted Hood when he was reworking Courageous as what he expected to be his trial horse, but which turned and bit him.

 

We may never know the full answer about what forces induced Brit to experiment with Mariner, but I worked with Brit to perform full scale towing tests on Valiant before Mariner was designed, and they made it clear the smaller scale Valiant models did not correctly predict the full- scale resistance of the yacht.

 

Designers must always face the trade-off of wanting to make a breakthrough at some risk and different ones have handle that differently - some opting for slow steady methodical improvement as Olin often seemed to do. It is sort of a variation of sailing to the layline; big potential gains if you are right, and the risk of terrible losses if you do not. Brit seemed by nature to be a "corner slammer".

 

As has been said, Mariner was but one data point in evaluating Brits accomplishments. I suspect it has taken on undue prominence because he was quite publicly challenging the status quo.

 

Karl

Tank testing in those days was a very iffy science, according to NA friends of mine. They finally discovered, as I understand it, that vortices from earlier runs down the trough were very persistent and invisible and distorted subsequent runs. Any knowledge of that?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Trailing vorticees were a problem for a time, but techniques to decrease the uncertainty level of test results seemed to handle that problem. The biggest challenge to displacement hull yacht tank testing is probably how to make sure the flow conditions on the model are the same as they will be full scale and how to break the model results into resistance components and scale each one appropriately to "ship" size; and especially with very small chord appendages.

 

The Mariner problem seems to have been that the model flow separation was different than the flow separation at ship scale. We offered to test a large Mariner model, but it was not the time and place.

 

 

Karl

Link to post
Share on other sites

I met Charlie about 20 years ago at the Nap show. He toured one of my boats and as he left he looked over at me and said "God bless you Bob".

I had the weird feeling I had just been Papally anointed. "Holy shit! Charley Morgan just interceded with God for me!" I have it made in the shade.

Since then I have always had a nice feeling about Charley. He certainly has been one of my heroes for many years.

 

My younger brother, maybe 10-12 at the time, went to Sarasota to hear Charley speak at an event. The kid walks up and speaks to him, Charley put his arm around his shoulder and spent several minutes talking with him. My parents were impressed that he would take the time like that.

 

I have been around him several times, never formally met him, but he has seemd like a regular guy whenever he was around. He was entertaining in the '70 video I have, especially considering the circumstances.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hootie, exactly 29 years ago I was sailing with Jeff Linton on his father's Morgan 24 in the Labor Day night race. Hurricane Elena was churning just offshore. A slog to windward down the bay in 25-30 knots to the Skyway. Several jib reaches, then a dead run up Hillsborough Bay under spinnaker... wind then over 40. Averaged 8 knots! Quarter wave breaking over transom into the cockpit. Rudder completely ineffective, you could swing tiller 30 deg either side with little effect. Boat just kept plowing straight ahead. Won race by 1 sec corrected over a Lindenburg 28. That a race I'll always remember. Morgan 24 damn fine little boat.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's Al Cassel's Warrior, at the start of Transpac 73, which she won Class A in 11-22-15-40 (elapsed) and finished 9th overall...she rated 47.94 IOR

 

Warriorcover.jpg

I'd love to get a copy of this Sea Magazine. Ragtime won 1st to finish over Windward passage, and I think started the real awareness that ultralight was the direction to go. I'd like to see what the coverage was of the race.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

The Chance 54 Glory was sailing before 1983. I know it sailed Vic-Maui and Clipper Cup in 1982. IIRC Glory had steering issues during Vic-Maui 1980 and diverted to San Francisco.

 

Blackbeard

Glory had two kind of steering issues:

 

It had absolutely no directional stability downwind in surfing conditions in its first configuration, until the keel was moved aft. Had a huge IOR flat spot under the bow with "chines" each side of the flat and a keel way forward. You'd start down a wave and the boat would crab down the wave face in the direction of its choosing. Very exciting for the driver.

 

Then it bent the rudder shaft about 400 miles off San Francisco, split open the rudder shell and sailed in only able to steer right and use sails to go left. A three day broach fest getting into the bay.

 

A very weird boat. Had a sticky spot at 4 knots where the transom just sucked up the ocean till speed jumped up to 6.

 

Apparently last seen rotting in Mexico.

 

On the way to Mexico the owner pulled her out at Mairiner Shipyard in Dana Point for some cruising modifications (forward cockpits gonna be a hot.tub!...such enthusiasm the owner had back then). Eva Holman was brought in for designing the wanted cruising modifications and she supplied the templates for the keel work (bog on sand off, bog on, sand off).

I thought it was cool that the Swiftsure plaques were left attached to her bulkhead.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

The Chance 54 Glory was sailing before 1983. I know it sailed Vic-Maui and Clipper Cup in 1982. IIRC Glory had steering issues during Vic-Maui 1980 and diverted to San Francisco.

 

Blackbeard

Glory had two kind of steering issues:

 

It had absolutely no directional stability downwind in surfing conditions in its first configuration, until the keel was moved aft. Had a huge IOR flat spot under the bow with "chines" each side of the flat and a keel way forward. You'd start down a wave and the boat would crab down the wave face in the direction of its choosing. Very exciting for the driver.

 

Then it bent the rudder shaft about 400 miles off San Francisco, split open the rudder shell and sailed in only able to steer right and use sails to go left. A three day broach fest getting into the bay.

 

A very weird boat. Had a sticky spot at 4 knots where the transom just sucked up the ocean till speed jumped up to 6.

 

Apparently last seen rotting in Mexico.

 

On the way to Mexico the owner pulled her out at Mairiner Shipyard in Dana Point for some cruising modifications (forward cockpits gonna be a hot.tub!...such enthusiasm the owner had back then). Eva Holman was brought in for designing the wanted cruising modifications and she supplied the templates for the keel work (bog on sand off, bog on, sand off).

I thought it was cool that the Swiftsure plaques were left attached to her bulkhead.

Hmmm...there was already recess in the forward cockpit for the life raft that we filled with water and used as a one person tub on deliveries. We talked about adding some Jacuzzi jets but never did anything. Somewhere there's a pic of my wife pretty much nekkid in it in mid-pacific.

 

The interior was not at all stripped so I don't know what Eva H. was going to add except some gold-plate. There was a full U galley, a raised dinette that sat 6+ easily, and a salon big enough for three couples to dance (Happened on a delivery to Hawaii on the owner's birthday party), an aft stateroom and a head aallllll the way in the bow, which as actually kind of a bouncy place to take a dump at 15+ knots. The boat has massive headroom.

 

What it needed most was massive help on cruising friendly rigging. And reinforcing around the winch attachments.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing in the way of structural that I can recall, it was more systems upgrade/replacement and rigging layout for short handed cruising.

I've no idea anymore about why the keel received a templating job.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...