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Some of my old sailing photos 2


Larry

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Leutwiler was the best in the business IMHO - even better than Beken. He had a cover of Sail mag that was an airial shot of Gannet - a big Chance ketch with two chutes and a blooper up, all colour matched in shades of blue - since it was from nearly directly overhead you could hardly see the boat. It was a gorgeous shot, almost like sculpture

I don't remember that shot. I did the SORC on Gannet, a very interesting boat to say the least.

 

 

I think the photo being reference might have been Ondine. (Very vague recollection.)

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Dance 1. Dale Smirl, Col YC. Wyl 39.

 

Dance-1-900-1.jpg

 

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Thunderbolt. R. Wallace, Excelsior MN. Nel/Mar 41. 1984 SORC, Class D, rated IOR 32.3 est.

St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race.

 

Thunderbolt-SORC-EDITED-SR-900.jpg

 

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Do you have any photos of the N/M 41 from the 1981 Admiral's Cup, Stars&Stripes. I saw the photo of the newer S&S, but not the older one from the Admirals Cup team.

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Stars & Stripes. Bill Martin, BYC. NM 39. 1983 Chicago to Mackinac Race. IOR Section 3, rated 30.0.

 

Stars-amp-Stripes-83-Mac-900-1.jpg

 

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If we are doing requests...Evergreen...C&C Canada's & Admiral's Cup 2 Tonner

Evergreen is the mythical unicorn here on SA. No one has ever said where she ended up or has any great photos of her.

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If we are doing requests...Evergreen...C&C Canada's & Admiral's Cup 2 Tonner

Evergreen is the mythical unicorn here on SA. No one has ever said where she ended up or has any great photos of her.

Rumo(u)r has it Elvis has her on the hard behind the gas station in Idaho, protected by a ring of unobtanium and Old Frothingslosh.

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What year was "Evergreen" in the Admirals Cup? I have a couple "Admirals Cup" books that have full page color photos. I may be able to find a photo of her.

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Have no idea where I found the attached...but that's all I have. I also have a pile of Black & White (yellowed) proofs from Sharon Green when the boat was originally launched and being trialed before the Canada's Cup in Hamilton (I grew up in Oakville where she was built). Knew one guy who worked on the build...they use to refer to her as the "Big Green Breakfast Bowl" and apparently she was built to implode on the finish line of the last race...I understand they even under engineered that and had to install an Aluminum Frame inside at one point. Final rumo(u)r I am aware of is she went to South America, had her gybing daggerboard replaced with a keel and was told never to reveal her identity as C&C felt it bad for their production reputation.

 

All just rumour...someone who knows Sharon Green should simply ask her...she probably knows the real story give it was her dad's boat. Definitely the proverbial Unicorn...the stuff of urban/nautical/anarchy legend. Otherwise there were a couple books written about her Canada's & Admiral's Cup adventures. All I "know"

post-22627-0-98373800-1385210706_thumb.jpg

post-22627-0-29071500-1385210762_thumb.jpg

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Re: Evergreen... I might not have this completely correct but I seem to recall what one of the guys at the club who sailed on Evergreen told me - that it was sold after the Admiral's Cup to a doctor or lawyer from the Boston area. The new owner only sailed the boat a few times as he found it overwhelming & over complicated... It apparently sat on a morning for ages until it was damaged beyond repair in a storm and subsequently scrapped.

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Mike...probably right...I can't even remember where I heard the South America rumour...would have certainly added something more mysterious to the story than rotting to death on her mooring. Someone will probably find her in a warehouse somewhere with that missing Avro Arrow :-)

post-22627-0-29890800-1385232083.jpg

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Evergreen. Donald R Green. Burlington, Ontario, Canada. Frers 45. 1983 SORC Class C, rated IOR 34.4. Miami to Nassau Race.

 

 

Evergreen-Square-800-SR.jpg

 

 

I don't know what yacht club Donald Green and Evergreen represented but would like to know. Thanks.

 

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Have no idea where I found the attached...but that's all I have. I also have a pile of Black & White (yellowed) proofs from Sharon Green when the boat was originally launched and being trialed before the Canada's Cup in Hamilton (I grew up in Oakville where she was built). Knew one guy who worked on the build...they use to refer to her as the "Big Green Breakfast Bowl" and apparently she was built to implode on the finish line of the last race...I understand they even under engineered that and had to install an Aluminum Frame inside at one point. Final rumo(u)r I am aware of is she went to South America, had her gybing daggerboard replaced with a keel and was told never to reveal her identity as C&C felt it bad for their production reputation.

 

All just rumour...someone who knows Sharon Green should simply ask her...she probably knows the real story give it was her dad's boat. Definitely the proverbial Unicorn...the stuff of urban/nautical/anarchy legend. Otherwise there were a couple books written about her Canada's & Admiral's Cup adventures. All I "know"

 

I've been wondering about this forever too. I asked Sharon before the Transpac. She said it sat for a long time on LIS and then sank at the dock (can't remember where). There was a rebuild of the docks going on and she thought they may have just left it on the bottom and built right over the top of it. Anyway, it's gone.

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I sailed it a couple of days in Cowes that summer helping Timmy 'Twinstay' Stearn and the guys with mast tune. All about keeping that skinny noodle in column. Hydraulics all over the place.

 

Not a particularly excellent offshore rig, but it did stay up.

 

The true fright was tight reaching with the pole near the headstay. Pole pushing the stick back, vang pressure on gooseneck pushing it sideways, so a non stop tap twiddling and pumping melody on the 4 hydraulic gooseneck and chicken stays to keep it all in line....

 

So much simpler now.

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Have no idea where I found the attached...but that's all I have. I also have a pile of Black & White (yellowed) proofs from Sharon Green when the boat was originally launched and being trialed before the Canada's Cup in Hamilton (I grew up in Oakville where she was built). Knew one guy who worked on the build...they use to refer to her as the "Big Green Breakfast Bowl" and apparently she was built to implode on the finish line of the last race...I understand they even under engineered that and had to install an Aluminum Frame inside at one point. Final rumo(u)r I am aware of is she went to South America, had her gybing daggerboard replaced with a keel and was told never to reveal her identity as C&C felt it bad for their production reputation.

 

All just rumour...someone who knows Sharon Green should simply ask her...she probably knows the real story give it was her dad's boat. Definitely the proverbial Unicorn...the stuff of urban/nautical/anarchy legend. Otherwise there were a couple books written about her Canada's & Admiral's Cup adventures. All I "know"

 

Is it just me or is the guy in the wipeout pic bench pressing the fucking tiller?

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Not a good reproduction, but this photo takes me back to an age when I was'not doing anything more exciting than playing around with dinghies, sailing with my parents, and looking at photos of girls in Mayfair or Penthouse magazines. Prospect of Whitby charging along seemed completely of a one with soft focus soft porn - both represented something unobtainable and exotic. What a champion wanker I was! It was the dust jacket of a book called Sail Power which I read and reread till limp (the book, not me).

S&S design built by Huisman and Berthons. 1973.

 

 

post-38-0-91325700-1385290552_thumb.jpg

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Have no idea where I found the attached...but that's all I have. I also have a pile of Black & White (yellowed) proofs from Sharon Green when the boat was originally launched and being trialed before the Canada's Cup in Hamilton (I grew up in Oakville where she was built). Knew one guy who worked on the build...they use to refer to her as the "Big Green Breakfast Bowl" and apparently she was built to implode on the finish line of the last race...I understand they even under engineered that and had to install an Aluminum Frame inside at one point. Final rumo(u)r I am aware of is she went to South America, had her gybing daggerboard replaced with a keel and was told never to reveal her identity as C&C felt it bad for their production reputation.

 

All just rumour...someone who knows Sharon Green should simply ask her...she probably knows the real story give it was her dad's boat. Definitely the proverbial Unicorn...the stuff of urban/nautical/anarchy legend. Otherwise there were a couple books written about her Canada's & Admiral's Cup adventures. All I "know"

Evergreen.jpeg

 

then next shot in the sequence......

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Interesting that so many here are still fascinated by Evergreen - I always thought it was just about the best example of the worst extremes of the IOR. It was fast when there were enough pros on board to keep the rig up, the hydraulics functioning and so forth.

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Interesting that so many here are still fascinated by Evergreen - I always thought it was just about the best example of the worst extremes of the IOR. It was fast when there were enough pros on board to keep the rig up, the hydraulics functioning and so forth.

It was about when Canada's cup was a big deal. Boats were built for that event.

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Evergreen was the big boat that "did it" for me. It so captivated my imagination that I had to get off the dinghies and on to the big boats. I spent 2 hours below on Evergreen at BYC right after they won the Canada's Cup. I was in complete awe of it. I was 15. I went on to do 2 Canada's Cups after that. It was a much different regatta back then.

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I think the real "appeal" of Evergreen was not that she represented the worst of IOR...but rather the most extreme of her era. She was cutting edge for her time and that was what was and still is very cool

Exactly. It looks run of the mill now, but look at other race boats from 1978 and you can see what the big deal is

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I think the real "appeal" of Evergreen was not that she represented the worst of IOR...but rather the most extreme of her era. She was cutting edge for her time and that was what was and still is very cool

Exactly. It looks run of the mill now, but look at other race boats from 1978 and you can see what the big deal is

+1

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I have one of the Evergreen books at home, I should scan a pic from the Admiral's Cup of the Canadian team. Evergreen rafted up to Pachena (Peterson 40ish) from that era, total apples and oranges moment.

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I have one of the Evergreen books at home, I should scan a pic from the Admiral's Cup of the Canadian team. Evergreen rafted up to Pachena (Peterson 40ish) from that era, total apples and oranges moment.

 

It should be noted that THAT Pachena - Peterson Two Tonner in alloy, is still afloat and looking good the last time I saw it.

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I have one of the Evergreen books at home, I should scan a pic from the Admiral's Cup of the Canadian team. Evergreen rafted up to Pachena (Peterson 40ish) from that era, total apples and oranges moment.

 

It should be noted that THAT Pachena - Peterson Two Tonner in alloy, is still afloat and looking good the last time I saw it.

Was that Canada's Cup sailed level, with no handicap delta? In two ton configuration? Or, was there a IOR handicap difference in the two boats?

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I have one of the Evergreen books at home, I should scan a pic from the Admiral's Cup of the Canadian team. Evergreen rafted up to Pachena (Peterson 40ish) from that era, total apples and oranges moment.

 

It should be noted that THAT Pachena - Peterson Two Tonner in alloy, is still afloat and looking good the last time I saw it.

Was that Canada's Cup sailed level, with no handicap delta? In two ton configuration? Or, was there a IOR handicap difference in the two boats?

Level - 2 tonners

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It peaked in importance in the Two Ton era - remember Golden Dazy? Or all the C&C boats - they designed a lot of the Canadian boats, not just Evergreen. It was a big deal back then - one of the most important trophies on the planet.

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HEATHER kicked PACHENA's ass. No contest. I was there.

 

Why is it that we are so taken by these old IOR boats?

I have my own personal reasons. But why do they endure ?

 

My guess is that all of us were in our teens/20's and those boats were the latest/greatest/fastest/sexiest. I still like the Farrah Fawcett poster too (yes, you all know which one I mean).

 

WWing

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HEATHER kicked PACHENA's ass. No contest. I was there.

 

Why is it that we are so taken by these old IOR boats?

I have my own personal reasons. But why do they endure ?

 

My guess is that all of us were in our teens/20's and those boats were the latest/greatest/fastest/sexiest. I still like the Farrah Fawcett poster too (yes, you all know which one I mean).

 

WWing

 

Same reason I think my '70 Chevelle SS is still the coolest car around.

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They are just drop dead gorgeous Bob.

 

 

I had pictures of them on my wall when I was a kid in the '80's and fantasized about sailing on them when in my opti (painted my first opti red and white like Hitch-hiker) Now own a converted ’83 Dubois 42ft 2 tonner and wouldn’t have anything else this side of $¼ mil

 

 

Wire halyards, hydraulics = big kahunas

 

HEATHER kicked PACHENA's ass. No contest. I was there.

 

Why is it that we are so taken by these old IOR boats?

I have my own personal reasons. But why do they endure ?

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HEATHER kicked PACHENA's ass. No contest. I was there.

 

Why is it that we are so taken by these old IOR boats?

I have my own personal reasons. But why do they endure ?

 

Because they are great looking, go to windward like mad and the racing was never bigger or better. They tend to be dirt cheap now as well.

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Ah, nostalgia ain't what it was. Kids today in 50 years time will go all gooey over the memory of TP52s and ACs and VO70s and Open 40s. But also, the game was a bit bigger then. For whatever reason it was more fashionable. You get few brownie points for yotting these days. The boss of BP was slaughtered by the press just for being seen on his boat at Cowes Week while the Gulf aftermath was going on. You don't get as many Prime Ministers (Heath) and captains of commerce (Turner) involved now. In the 70s and 80s everyone was doing it - now, although the rich are richer, the middle market is relatively poorer - it's a niche sport again.

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My own reasons:

 

There was a feeling of constant and fast progress either in design or equipment: challenging!

Performance goal-posts were moving up every year (with hindsight they were not that high in the late 60s, making it easier).

Great magazine coverage which extensively featured "hero yachts" to dream of; but ..... at the same time: getting involved was easy, getting to fight in the top of the fleet with your "heroes" was not an unrealistic dream, even if you had a job aside.

And .... one could even plan putting up a competitive yacht project and still remain within the means of many reasonably wealthy owners, even with a new original design.

 

Add to this: longer race formats with shorter crews and very minimal nav instruments, you had the spice of adventure the 70's loved.

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<<And .... one could even plan putting up a competitive yacht project and still remain within the means of many reasonably wealthy owners, even with a new original design.>>

 

I agree: so much of our world has become polarised between the very rich and the rest. In the 70s and 80s there were plumbers and farmers doing racing at a fairly high level. It's like the '20s and '30s again now with grotesque displays of wealth: maybe not so much abject poverty as then, but ...

 

In Blighty, there also seems to have been a flight to the centre. I think serious offshore racing is still doing pretty well in the Solent, but it seems that other once-serious racing centres are struggling somewhat, with numbers down. Is this the case in the Land of the Free? I think you might just be able to squeeze a VO70 into my home port. But only just. You certainly couldn't race it there, or a TP52.

 

Surely technical change over the last decade has been at least as fast as in the '70s. Think of the materials, the rigs, the keels, the speeds. And while magazines are of course weaker, think of the interwebs. When I was 18 I used to smuggle Yachts and Yachting into work and read and re-read it, but now here I am aged 55, supposed to be working but still looking at boat porn, on the computer now. And the ogling potential of the internet is extraordinary - just look at all the videos from the Volvos. Plenty of heroes, and unobtainable Farrah Fawcett Majors there.

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Sure the interweb is great but sometimes turning things into a Spectator sport to my feeling.

Many of the heroes look to me like excellent (weak word for how good they are) professionals completing their daily job + a very small number of "alien" people (from outer space) be it Spithill, Cammas, Joyon, Read etc... etc... leading them.

 

"Unobtainable Farah Fawcett Majors" yes there are, but "unobtainable" looks to be the new climate.

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I love the look of the IOR designs with their sharp reverse transoms. I dont like it when they are hallowed out with steps, but I do know it makes getting onto the boat easier, but way sexier when its smooth. :D I hate the flat transoms as they seem passionless. The raked transoms of the classic J-Class are great too. But flat is meh.

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<<And .... one could even plan putting up a competitive yacht project and still remain within the means of many reasonably wealthy owners, even with a new original design.>>

 

I agree: so much of our world has become polarised between the very rich and the rest. In the 70s and 80s there were plumbers and farmers doing racing at a fairly high level. It's like the '20s and '30s again now with grotesque displays of wealth: maybe not so much abject poverty as then, but ...

 

Exactly right. More like the "Gilded Age" of the 1890's though - the Robber Baron era. The initial period of the IOR - up to the change in the One Ton rating, was probably the most vibrant and interesting period of sail racing ever. Now that things are virtually all forms of one design, it just ain't as interesting. Someone noted that the interest in IOR faded when the designers got things so fine tuned that the boats all became alike - "One design".

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Clearly you know that the IOR Days were the best decades for yacht racing, certainly in our lifetimes and likely ever. Why is debatable. When you combine the social changes of the 60's, the relative economic prosperity of the 70's, the changes in materials for boats and sails and the relative stability of the IOR rule with the cast of characters that participated, the results were magic. The boats were exceptional, the regattas and races were epic, the competition was unmatched and the parties were..., indescribable. It is hard to imagine a repetition of those conditions. Certainly the most important ingredient, the people, were completely unique and the times that shaped them can never be recreated.

 

So these days, while it is very nice to blast along at 25 knots on a large mono-hull, to feel a large multi-hull accelerate so quickly out of a tack that you must hold on hard to something or to race sport boats in a large fleet, nothing even comes close to the rush of the IOR Days. Which is why, many are so taken with old IOR boats. They invoke fond memories.

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Clearly you know that the IOR Days were the best decades for yacht racing, certainly in our lifetimes and likely ever. Why is debatable. When you combine the social changes of the 60's, the relative economic prosperity of the 70's, the changes in materials for boats and sails and the relative stability of the IOR rule with the cast of characters that participated, the results were magic. The boats were exceptional, the regattas and races were epic, the competition was unmatched and the parties were..., indescribable. It is hard to imagine a repetition of those conditions. Certainly the most important ingredient, the people, were completely unique and the times that shaped them can never be recreated.

 

So these days, while it is very nice to blast along at 25 knots on a large mono-hull, to feel a large multi-hull accelerate so quickly out of a tack that you must hold on hard to something or to race sport boats in a large fleet, nothing even comes close to the rush of the IOR Days. Which is why, many are so taken with old IOR boats. They invoke fond memories.

 

First big boats I ever sailed as a kid were IOR. I think I can track my first real experience being on Dr. Deck's Jonathan Livingston Seagull out of American YC, prob mid seventies. Interesting boat with a pre loaded rig (fixed backstay) and an adjustable forestay...

 

IIRC, there were really no professionally crewed boats back then, at least not on eastern LIS. Sure their was a 'Yacht Captain' but that seemed to be it for around the cans sailing. Used to see Infinity all the time, was that pro crewed back then?

 

It just seemed to more social and inclusive without $10K/day crew expenses like most of the current programs at the pointy end of our sport.

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The "pro crew" thing was under the table then - the rules said Corinthian so the pro's had to be disguised. When a boat had Lowell North and Tim Stearns aboard it was pro but it remained unspoken. There were plenty of "pro" deck apes following the circuits then as well but they worked for food, beer and constant top level sailing. To say that a boat like Kialoa III was an amateur endeavour is kidding oneself.

 

I'm not being an old fart to say it WAS better then, even if the boats are faster now. Fast is a very relative word when it comes to sailboats - a Model A Ford can outrun the fastest sailboat that ever existed. It's only recently that the fastest boats became able to outrun a thoroughbred horse. A Cheetah is still faster than any sailboat.

 

Like every other form of competition, too much money (read advertising) doesn't improve things, it only ups the numbers and eliminates the amateur competitors. Formula One was far more interesting before the gigantic ad budgets. Drag racing was far more interesting when it was almost all amateur. NASCAR was better when it was moonshiners and good old boys racing. The Olympics were better before the pro's were allowed in.

 

Nowadays, the most interesting competition out there is land speed racing - exclusively amateur outside the jet LSR cars.

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The "pro crew" thing was under the table then - the rules said Corinthian so the pro's had to be disguised. When a boat had Lowell North and Tim Stearns aboard it was pro but it remained unspoken. There were plenty of "pro" deck apes following the circuits then as well but they worked for food, beer and constant top level sailing. To say that a boat like Kialoa III was an amateur endeavour is kidding oneself.

 

Sorry for the highjack, I'm feeling the nostalgia of the IOR days of my yute via this thread! Has a pic of Ziegler's Gem been posted?

 

Kialoa as an amateur program is a stretch for sure - looking back now! I had pics of Kialoa and Windward Passage hanging on my walls! Never really even considered crew were paid anything beyond the captain. The privilege alone would have been enough for me!

 

The bold text above is what I'm talking about. You'd sail for food and beer just to be on the boat and in the race. Now, those bow apes are making full time livings along with food and beer! I do remember knowing industry pros were on other boats. But they seemed to be just that, industry pros from sail lofts and marine vendors - not straight up paid crew that exclusively grind, do pit, tactics or bow etc - for a living.

 

I guess that change was more profound than we expected?

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Gem. William Ziegler III, Noroton YC. CTM 47 (woofwoof mentioned Nelson Marek in the old thread).

 

Storm Trysail Week, 1983. Block Island. IOR Class 1, rated 36.9. Scratch sheet says CTM 47.

 

 

Picture12-2.png

 

 

burnsed mentioned that she met her ultimate fate, scrapping, near Galveston after donation.

 

Found it! I thought it had a totally dif color scheme... for'n aft light to dark greenish lines, or am I thinking of Imp?

 

Edit: Yup, Imp has the green stripe fade. Where oh where have the brain cells gone?

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That is one of the best looking boats I have ever seen, I love the modern boats but man those old IOR ladies were good looking!

Evergreen. Donald R Green. Burlington, Ontario, Canada. Frers 45. 1983 SORC Class C, rated IOR 34.4. Miami to Nassau Race.

 

 

Evergreen-Square-800-SR.jpg

 

 

I don't know what yacht club Donald Green and Evergreen represented but would like to know. Thanks.

 

.

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I think the real "appeal" of Evergreen was not that she represented the worst of IOR...but rather the most extreme of her era. She was cutting edge for her time and that was what was and still is very cool

That, and Don Green's daughter Sharon who has become one of the best sailing photographers in the business.

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Industry pros:

 

After being a deck-ape joining in for the fun, I became a marine vendor and got to know many of the guys.

 

Conditions of their presence varied.

 

On 70's Italian ACs for exemple and early maxis, the wealthy owner would place an order with this or that North loft without much bargaining on price, except that they insisted for such or such loft manager to sail onboard as a tactician or even skipper as part of the deal.

In parallel, people launching new products or brands would bank on their standing as a sailor to get the order from one owner, promising to come and help the boat win (promotion was at stake).

 

On the other hand, I remember a few occasions of Bnto ton-cups or racing campaigns in the early 80's when not only the "pro" had to sail onboard for free but also had to bring his own sails or other equipment. Production yachts were booming and business joined in the fray.

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I think the real "appeal" of Evergreen was not that she represented the worst of IOR...but rather the most extreme of her era. She was cutting edge for her time and that was what was and still is very cool

 

What made Evergreen the most extreme?

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I love the shot of Evergreen with the bowman on the rail wearing the height of sailing fashion at the time. A line 7 smock. I remeber when I bought my first one, I thought I had made it to the "bigs".

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I think the real "appeal" of Evergreen was not that she represented the worst of IOR...but rather the most extreme of her era. She was cutting edge for her time and that was what was and still is very cool

 

What made Evergreen the most extreme?

It had the skinniest and most complex rig to that point. Tim Stearn pretty well had to be on board to keep it standing - and to fix the leaking hydraulics. Its structural build was extraordinarily lightweight for the time as well.

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I think the real "appeal" of Evergreen was not that she represented the worst of IOR...but rather the most extreme of her era. She was cutting edge for her time and that was what was and still is very cool

 

What made Evergreen the most extreme?

It had the skinniest and most complex rig to that point. Tim Stearn pretty well had to be on board to keep it standing - and to fix the leaking hydraulics. Its structural build was extraordinarily lightweight for the time as well.

Open chequebook design, including a stipulation that C&C could not build anything remotely similar for some period of time. Open transom was still novel at the time, the interior was dramatically spartan compared to other 'ocean racers' of the era. The hatches to get in and out were way out to the sides, forward, and opened inwards in a bid to speed up sail changes. I think this feature may have been removed before Fastnet to avoid sinking in a knockdown.

 

The Stearns rig was super noodley and had the most complex hydraulics up to that point. Lowell North was involved from the design stage and Evergreen had some of the first 'garbage bag' mylar north genoas. I think just the #1s.

 

After waffling between frac and masthead, they settled on masthead but again compared to contemporaries, the rig was more forward, with a big main and tall narrow foretriangle.

 

The boat had a daggerboard, which was not that unusual, but the board was set up to gybe, which was a big deal at the time.

 

The construction materials were pretty progressive at the time too I think - kevlar/nomex maybe? Can't remember but pretty advanced for the 70s.

 

I think there were a few other items but I can't remember now.

 

I also recall that when they found out the owner had to steer for the Canada Cup (match racing) they installed a powerboat throttle at the back, connected to an angle indicator in front of the helm, so that the tactician could basically direct the helmsman where to point the tiller at any given time. It caused a stir as everyone thought Stearns sitting at the back with a throttle in his hand must be adjusting something super secret inside the boat.

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I love the shot of Evergreen with the bowman on the rail wearing the height of sailing fashion at the time. A line 7 smock. I remeber when I bought my first one, I thought I had made it to the "bigs".

I believe that dude in the Line 7 gear is Dave Kuhl, the Aussie bowman who worked for North at the time and sailed on the boat for a while.

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I love the shot of Evergreen with the bowman on the rail wearing the height of sailing fashion at the time. A line 7 smock. I remeber when I bought my first one, I thought I had made it to the "bigs".

I believe that dude in the Line 7 gear is Dave Kuhl, the Aussie bowman who worked for North at the time and sailed on the boat for a while.

The guy to leeward is Lowell himself.

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I love the shot of Evergreen with the bowman on the rail wearing the height of sailing fashion at the time. A line 7 smock. I remeber when I bought my first one, I thought I had made it to the "bigs".

I believe that dude in the Line 7 gear is Dave Kuhl, the Aussie bowman who worked for North at the time and sailed on the boat for a while.

Pic of "Line 7 gear"?

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The "pro crew" thing was under the table then - the rules said Corinthian so the pro's had to be disguised. When a boat had Lowell North and Tim Stearns aboard it was pro but it remained unspoken. There were plenty of "pro" deck apes following the circuits then as well but they worked for food, beer and constant top level sailing. To say that a boat like Kialoa III was an amateur endeavour is kidding oneself.

 

This is pretty true. Late-70s/early-80s, I made my living in the game, but not on the race course. Being a "corinthian sport", I never made a buck on the race course. But I made a nice living delivering race boats from place to place, running an on-demand/on-venue rigging service, etc. Plus all the perks - clothes, foulies, gear, got to see some great parts of the world and sometimes flew home on the owners dimes, etc. Truth is, I never "made" much money, but I never needed any because much of my lifestyle was on an owner's dime.

 

Those were the days.

 

Oh, and to the other point... I think that is actually why we remember the IOR days so fondly. It was because we normal mortals *could* walk down a dock and have a good chance of getting a try-out on a boat we'd read about in the magazines, and if we did well we might just get invited back. I can't think of another sport where a no-name 20-something can go from walkon to team-member these days.... certainly not in the pro sailing world.

 

$.02

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I love the shot of Evergreen with the bowman on the rail wearing the height of sailing fashion at the time. A line 7 smock. I remeber when I bought my first one, I thought I had made it to the "bigs".

 

Heh. That stuff was state-of-the-art protection, besides being trendy. Waterproof, air-proof, darn-near bullet proof. And if you ever needed to drop some pounds for a weigh-in, just go for a jog in a suit of it.

 

I think I've actually still got a suit of it in the garage. Maybe it works as a hazmat suit, too?

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Boomerang. George Koumantaros, STC. Kaufman 65. 1983 Storm Trysail Week, Class A, Block Island RI.

 

Boomerang-Another-900-1.jpg

 

.

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Happy BD mate. Thank you for your wonderful pictures over the years. I know a lot of us are stuck in the nostalgic mode from the IOR '70's & '80's era but you show a lot of class keeping this going!

 

For that we'll always thank you for that.

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Thanks for the birthday greeting on the occasion of my 71st.

 

To all who have enjoyed viewing my photos, thank you and you are entirely welcome.

 

Also, thank you to all who have contributed to the threads with your posts of dialogue and images.

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Happy belated at this point. Your work is one of the primary reasons I visit this site. I wish you a wonderful holidays and a great year,

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Kialoa IV. John B. (Jim) Kilroy, El Segundo CA. Holland 80. 1983 SORC, St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race. Class A, rated IOR 70.0.

 

Kialoa-from-Astern-83W-900a.jpg

 

.

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71st you say. Well done. Your pics are the only thing that brings me back to the Forums. Please keep it up. It is a treasure to us old guys. Cheers.

it's a treasure to all............

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Kialoa IV. John B. (Jim) Kilroy, El Segundo CA. Holland 80. 1983 SORC, St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race. Class A, rated IOR 70.0.

 

... ...

 

.

 

 

That's a great photo another great pic Larry.

Thanks again for the best thread in this whole forum. I apologize for missing your birthday, hope it was good for ya... and many more!

 

FB- Doug

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With apologies to Larry for the qualitiy of these pictures, here are two pictures from the Truman Annex after the 1981 (or '82?) Ft Lauderdale to Key West Race. Rafted up are Seier, Marionette, Fame, and two others, and in the other picture, Infinity among others.

post-58168-0-73160700-1386376907_thumb.jpg

post-58168-0-79773300-1386376988_thumb.jpg

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Boy, if I had spent the price of a house on one of those boats back then I'd be REALLY pissed to have it referred to as "among others". :P

 

By the way, I think the green boat behind Infinity is Locura - the 39' that was butchered here a few years ago.

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Great pic, always thought K-4 was a good looking boat. Happy belated also, you have posted some great stuff here. Any war stories to relate during the years of aerial photography? I seem to remember reading a story ages ago about an aerial team covering cigarette powerboat racing. The helo is just in front of Don Aronow's boat, the godfather of that genre and flying quite low. The boat gets launched off a wave and apparently the bow ends up hitting one of the runners on the helo-pretty exciting stuff.

 

Kialoa IV. John B. (Jim) Kilroy, El Segundo CA. Holland 80. 1983 SORC, St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race. Class A, rated IOR 70.0.

 

Kialoa-from-Astern-83W-900a.jpg

 

.

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With apologies to Larry for the qualitiy of these pictures, here are two pictures from the Truman Annex after the 1981 (or '82?) Ft Lauderdale to Key West Race. Rafted up are Seier, Marionette, Fame, and two others, and in the other picture, Infinity among others.

I see Hotflash and the 40' Locura!

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With apologies to Larry for the qualitiy of these pictures, here are two pictures from the Truman Annex after the 1981 (or '82?) Ft Lauderdale to Key West Race. Rafted up are Seier, Marionette, Fame, and two others, and in the other picture, Infinity among others.

And Goodbye Girl on the other side of Fame, another Serendipity 43.

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Evergreen. Donald R Green. Burlington, Ontario, Canada. Frers 45. 1983 SORC Class C, rated IOR 34.4.

Miami to Nassau Race.

 

 

Evergreen-Alone-900.jpg

 

.

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With apologies to Larry for the qualitiy of these pictures, here are two pictures from the Truman Annex after the 1981 (or '82?) Ft Lauderdale to Key West Race. Rafted up are Seier, Marionette, Fame, and two others, and in the other picture, Infinity among others.

And Goodbye Girl on the other side of Fame, another Serendipity 43.
It's interesting to see the 43's, one with a wheel and the other a tiller. Of course Scarlett was a tiller. Thank you Larry for that shot too.

 

post-33230-0-23280300-1386861813_thumb.jpg

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With apologies to Larry for the qualitiy of these pictures, here are two pictures from the Truman Annex after the 1981 (or '82?) Ft Lauderdale to Key West Race. Rafted up are Seier, Marionette, Fame, and two others, and in the other picture, Infinity among others.

And Goodbye Girl on the other side of Fame, another Serendipity 43.
It's interesting to see the 43's, one with a wheel and the other a tiller. Of course Scarlett was a tiller. Thank you Larry for that shot too.

 

attachicon.gif5152034107_3ac1ef6737_o.jpg

 

I sailed on Goodbye Girl that year. There were three versions of the Serendipity 43, the Grand Prix like Scarlett, the mid range like GG and then a cruising type with a nicer interior. I think that year there were 8-9 Peterson 43's of various type (some Jeremy Rogers built boats as well), all the same hull. As you might expect, the nicer the interior, the slower you were.

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With apologies to Larry for the qualitiy of these pictures, here are two pictures from the Truman Annex after the 1981 (or '82?) Ft Lauderdale to Key West Race. Rafted up are Seier, Marionette, Fame, and two others, and in the other picture, Infinity among others.

And Goodbye Girl on the other side of Fame, another Serendipity 43.
It's interesting to see the 43's, one with a wheel and the other a tiller. Of course Scarlett was a tiller. Thank you Larry for that shot too.

 

attachicon.gif5152034107_3ac1ef6737_o.jpg

 

I sailed on Goodbye Girl that year. There were three versions of the Serendipity 43, the Grand Prix like Scarlett, the mid range like GG and then a cruising type with a nicer interior. I think that year there were 8-9 Peterson 43's of various type (some Jeremy Rogers built boats as well), all the same hull. As you might expect, the nicer the interior, the slower you were.

Do you mean moonshine or contessa 43 were the same Peterson design ?

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There were a great deal more than 9 or 10 of the various versions of the Peterson 43 and built by more than one manufacturer. There is are several existing threads on SA devoted to them and even a blog out there. I think that the agreed upon count is well into the 20s.

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=63543 Many had mutiple owners and long and successful racing lives--some still racing.

 

Robin

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I think the Contessa was. We sailed GG in the '82 SORC and I think there were about 20 boats in class. Victory from England (which had the crew that would sail Victory '83 in the next Cup) was a Dubois 44' and they won class, only to be thrown out of the series when Bruce Nelson, who was sailing Thunderbolt in the same class, noticed that the freeboards were way off from the certificate. They actually rated a full foot higher than their certificate said.

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Wrong and double wrong. Contessa 43 was a totally different, earlier design. Not even similar.

Then .... Victory .... Riccardo Deambrosio had chartered Goodbye Girl, and tried to buy Victory after she finished so well in AC 81. Peter Unsavoury screwed him around big time, so he built Charrua, and, being in the shipping business, had Victory "help up" clearing customs on arrival in the US for the SORC, and had Bruce and others check her measurements. Yes, she was 1.2' out! Dubious protested innocence ....

 

Riccardo was a good guy, unlike the others.

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Not even similar.

 

Only a true IOR enthusiast could say that. :D The "differences" between most "normal" IOR boats in any 3 year period was only visible to a skilled eye. Other than graphics and hardware layout anyway.

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Wrong and double wrong. Contessa 43 was a totally different, earlier design. Not even similar.

Then .... Victory .... Riccardo Deambrosio had chartered Goodbye Girl, and tried to buy Victory after she finished so well in AC 81. Peter Unsavoury screwed him around big time, so he built Charrua, and, being in the shipping business, had Victory "help up" clearing customs on arrival in the US for the SORC, and had Bruce and others check her measurements. Yes, she was 1.2' out! Dubious protested innocence ....

 

Riccardo was a good guy, unlike the others.

cms please put some water in your scotch, a 2 years old plan from Peterson cant be "wrong double wrong,not even similar or totaly different" with a same 43 feet' boat lengh...

Why are you so uppish? This is a forum, to share and talk about, not a place to teach with "cuistres" as professors :(

If you have any personal trouble with me, please mail me direct w'll have a cup :) ?

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