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Some of my old sailing photos 2


Larry

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Sorry Chorus, no offence intended .... this is Sailing Anarchy?

 

I sailed and sold several Contessa 43s and Serendipitys. IOR was moving quite fast then, so there was significant progress between the 2 designs.

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There is a Choate/Peterson 42 in town from that era that was built with a Ganbare-shaped narrow/stubby transom and a couple years later the back half of the hull cut out and a stern very much like the Serendipity stern put on. I can't imagine it was very old at the time. Must have been some progress at least perceived at that time.

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I'm curious... I wonder which 42 that is? I sailed on the first few of them (Mini-x-pres was #1, IIRC) and have always wondered what happened to them. They were actually pretty good hulls, but badly mis-rigged IMO.

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That one is/was Kaidaka. Many blue stripes darkest at bottom I think.

It was Kadaka actually; but no biggie with the spelling. Used to be called Kotuku on Vancouver Island. We never knew what Kadaka meant so we decided it was the green slime in a Dash 34 open cockpit lockers for winch handles etc. We use to say it like a sneeze: Kaaa....daka! Yes, dark blue at waterline and up to the rail. Basically an Imp colour motif but in blue. I have a bunch of pics somewhere.

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26 Serendipity 43s where built in total. There are 2 or 3 unaccounted for and after hurricane Sandy, Fame is no more.

 

--Matt

 

There were a great deal more than 9 or 10 of the various versions of the Peterson 43 and built by more than one manufacturer. There is are several existing threads on SA devoted to them and even a blog out there. I think that the agreed upon count is well into the 20s.

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=63543 Many had mutiple owners and long and successful racing lives--some still racing.

 

Robin

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With apologies to Larry for the qualitiy of these pictures, here are two pictures from the Truman Annex after the 1981 (or '82?) Ft Lauderdale to Key West Race. Rafted up are Seier, Marionette, Fame, and two others, and in the other picture, Infinity among others.

And Goodbye Girl on the other side of Fame, another Serendipity 43.
It's interesting to see the 43's, one with a wheel and the other a tiller. Of course Scarlett was a tiller. Thank you Larry for that shot too.

 

attachicon.gif5152034107_3ac1ef6737_o.jpg

Dee Smith Driving?

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Scanned this picture I found in my Dad's old files.

 

From Left to right:

Williwaw

Acadia

Cogg-nizant (ex-Bay Bea, I was aboard)

Love Machine

 

Almost certain it was taken at the start of the 1976 Miami-Nassau Race (SORC) just before we entered the Gulf Stream where things got nasty. Know that famous aerial shot of Love Machine getting hammered by a wave? Was taken about 30 minutes later. I know because Tom Leutwiler got a similar shot of us which I still have (blown up so can't scan). I think we had a few reefs in by the time he took the shot. Should have had one in when this was taken!

 

FYI: Good article on the race if you search the Sports Illustrated archives for "Reaching and Retching to Nassau".

post-40151-0-09863600-1388707261_thumb.jpg

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Glory. John Buchan. Peterson 42. 1983 SORC, Class D, rated IOR 32.6. St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race.

 

Glory-83-SORC-W-900-BIC.png

 

.

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Scanned this picture I found in my Dad's old files.

 

From Left to right:

Williwaw

Acadia

Cogg-nizant (ex-Bay Bea, I was aboard)

Love Machine

 

Almost certain it was taken at the start of the 1976 Miami-Nassau Race (SORC) just before we entered the Gulf Stream where things got nasty. Know that famous aerial shot of Love Machine getting hammered by a wave? Was taken about 30 minutes later. I know because Tom Leutwiler got a similar shot of us which I still have (blown up so can't scan). I think we had a few reefs in by the time he took the shot. Should have had one in when this was taken!

 

FYI: Good article on the race if you search the Sports Illustrated archives for "Reaching and Retching to Nassau".

Linky Here: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1090820/index.htm

We were just talking about this article over in the Dick Carter thread. 76 Miami Nassau was the race that the Standfast 40 Mary E. sank in. The article mentions this.

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Ah, Glory. Now there was a fancy program.

 

I remember them arriving in St Pete that year just before the SORC. An amazing convoy trundling past the St Pete YC in front of all the BNs of the day: two new boat vans, both beautifully painted in the boat's colors, then a custom Peterbilt tractor trailer rig, also painted in the boat's colors, with the boat on the back.

 

Shame she wasn't as fast as she looked!

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Thanks for posting the link to the SI story on the 1976 Miami Nassau Race. It was a hell of a ride. I just stumbled across a proof of the Leutwiler shot of us (S&S 49 Cogg-Nizant) crossing the stream. Proof quality not up to Larry's standards but gives a good idea how rough that day was. That's a lot of exposed Palmer Johnson aluminum and lead!

post-40151-0-63001900-1390052857_thumb.jpg

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Detente. 1984 SORC.

 

Detente-under-Tow-1024.jpg

 

.

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Detente. 1984 SORC.

 

Detente-under-Tow-1024.jpg

 

.

Gotta love Tom B! "Get all the sails out boys we need to do a little advertising" All this discussion about faster boats, getting the youth involved etc. We could also use more characters like Tom to build our sport.

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Glory. John Buchan. Peterson 42. 1983 SORC, Class D, rated IOR 32.6. St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race.

 

Glory-83-SORC-W-900-BIC.png

 

.

Being on the younger side could a knowledgeable old timer explain the jib tack being on tracks(?).

 

 

Not a jib but a tall-boy staysail, Tack of tallboys was moved in and out athwartship, depending on the wind-angle.

 

Now the pic is not too large and I can't confirm, but I do not think that those are tracks.

More like toe-rails

At one point - starting from SORC '77 I believe - a trend developed to bring the toe-rails inboard, this looked interesting for the N°1 at first sight.

I had it fitted on a boat but did not like it in action !

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Blade Runner in Miami. Nick Heyl, Lynn NJ. Rachel-Pugh 47. 1985 SORC, Class C.

 

TomBlackalleronBladeRunner83SORCMiami102

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Old 1981 SORC photos from St. Pete... Mike Topa on Midnight Sun.

 

Ah, the Holland 51. I did the 81 Animals' Cup on that one with the French team. With Timmy "Twinstay" Stearn, Jean-Louis Fabry and other disreputables. We won the Channel Race outright as J-LF was/is the quintessential Channel naviguesser and found the CH-1 buoy off Cherbourg in the fog mainly by just sniffing for it.

 

Also did the 82 Sardinia Cup on it when chartered to the New Guinea team. Similar crew too, but fewer French. Excellent boat.

 

Must post pix.....

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Old 1981 SORC photos from St. Pete... Mike Topa on Midnight Sun.

 

Ah, the Holland 51. I did the 81 Animals' Cup on that one with the French team. With Timmy "Twinstay" Stearn, Jean-Louis Fabry and other disreputables. We won the Channel Race outright as J-LF was/is the quintessential Channel naviguesser and found the CH-1 buoy off Cherbourg in the fog mainly by just sniffing for it.

 

Also did the 82 Sardinia Cup on it when chartered to the New Guinea team. Similar crew too, but fewer French. Excellent boat.

 

Must post pix.....

Does she was named "midnight sun" for this time ?

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Old 1981 SORC photos from St. Pete... Mike Topa on Midnight Sun.

 

Ah, the Holland 51. I did the 81 Animals' Cup on that one with the French team. With Timmy "Twinstay" Stearn, Jean-Louis Fabry and other disreputables. We won the Channel Race outright as J-LF was/is the quintessential Channel naviguesser and found the CH-1 buoy off Cherbourg in the fog mainly by just sniffing for it.

 

Also did the 82 Sardinia Cup on it when chartered to the New Guinea team. Similar crew too, but fewer French. Excellent boat.

 

Must post pix.....

Does she was named "midnight sun" for this time ?

 

Yes. Chartered for the French AC team in 81 from the Swedish owner. Then the following year chartered again for the Papua New Guinea Sardinia Cup team. Always kept the same name.

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Well, snowed in today. Forgive me if it's been posted before but my search function doesn't work. Was surfing the net and found this really cool archived movie/documentary of antigua race week.... I'm guessing late seventies. Anyway there's some good footage of Battlecry Warbaby Immigrant and the C and C 61 Triumph. It brought back some good memories and I wouldn't be surprised if some of the posters on this thread aren't in it. Even has some topless chicks in it to make boothie and gouvernal happy, some good shots of spins blowing up/hoisted wrong and.....wait for it.......bloopers. By the way Rick there's even some footage of a 52 racing and having a cow about a freedom 40. Sorry Bob.

 

<iframe src="https://archive.org/embed/spinnakers_in_the_wind" width="640" height="480" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" allowfullscreen></iframe>

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CVB93566, on 14 Feb 2014 - 07:07, said:

Well, snowed in today. Forgive me if it's been posted before but my search function doesn't work. Was surfing the net and found this really cool archived movie/documentary of antigua race week.... I'm guessing late seventies. Anyway there's some good footage of Battlecry Warbaby Immigrant and the C and C 61 Triumph. It brought back some good memories and I wouldn't be surprised if some of the posters on this thread aren't in it. Even has some topless chicks in it to make boothie and gouvernal happy, some good shots of spins blowing up/hoisted wrong and.....wait for it.......bloopers. By the way Rick there's even some footage of a 52 racing and having a cow about a freedom 40. Sorry Bob.

 

<iframe src="https://archive.org/embed/spinnakers_in_the_wind" width="640" height="480" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Amazing snapshot of 1981, a real time-warp. Thanks for posting.
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Anybody who still doesn't "get" the IOR years should watch that.

 

My first real racing big boat experience was on classic IORs on LIS in the 70s. They will always hold a place in my heart! Doing bow was quite the experience...

 

Now I've got to scan all my '84 Newport to Bermuda dock picks and upload them...

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Well, snowed in today. Forgive me if it's been posted before but my search function doesn't work. Was surfing the net and found this really cool archived movie/documentary of antigua race week.... I'm guessing late seventies. Anyway there's some good footage of Battlecry Warbaby Immigrant and the C and C 61 Triumph. It brought back some good memories and I wouldn't be surprised if some of the posters on this thread aren't in it. Even has some topless chicks in it to make boothie and gouvernal happy, some good shots of spins blowing up/hoisted wrong and.....wait for it.......bloopers. By the way Rick there's even some footage of a 52 racing and having a cow about a freedom 40. Sorry Bob.

 

<iframe src="https://archive.org/embed/spinnakers_in_the_wind" width="640" height="480" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

Holy Harriett.... There's us on the Olson 30 Riptide, spinning round the weather mark into a gybe set.

 

Jol Byerley - ultimate local knowledge, and Jude with the ultimate tits. Julian Gildersleeve and me pulling strings. There was one other lady with even more remarkable tits courtesy of plastic surgeon Robin Tattersall of the BVI.

 

Happy days indeed.

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CVB93566, on 14 Feb 2014 - 07:07, said:

Well, snowed in today. Forgive me if it's been posted before but my search function doesn't work. Was surfing the net and found this really cool archived movie/documentary of antigua race week.... I'm guessing late seventies. Anyway there's some good footage of Battlecry Warbaby Immigrant and the C and C 61 Triumph. It brought back some good memories and I wouldn't be surprised if some of the posters on this thread aren't in it. Even has some topless chicks in it to make boothie and gouvernal happy, some good shots of spins blowing up/hoisted wrong and.....wait for it.......bloopers. By the way Rick there's even some footage of a 52 racing and having a cow about a freedom 40. Sorry Bob.

 

<iframe src="https://archive.org/embed/spinnakers_in_the_wind" width="640" height="480" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Amazing snapshot of 1981, a real time-warp. Thanks for posting.

Dang....I was there, and now I'm here...sitting at my damn desk.

 

1981, my best year of sailing: Transpac, Clipper Cup, PNW summer cruise, Big Boat, Antigua, Bermuda, and a dozen 2-tonners in Seattle

Friggin' youth has all the fun.

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CVB93566, on 14 Feb 2014 - 07:07, said:

Well, snowed in today. Forgive me if it's been posted before but my search function doesn't work. Was surfing the net and found this really cool archived movie/documentary of antigua race week.... I'm guessing late seventies. Anyway there's some good footage of Battlecry Warbaby Immigrant and the C and C 61 Triumph. It brought back some good memories and I wouldn't be surprised if some of the posters on this thread aren't in it. Even has some topless chicks in it to make boothie and gouvernal happy, some good shots of spins blowing up/hoisted wrong and.....wait for it.......bloopers. By the way Rick there's even some footage of a 52 racing and having a cow about a freedom 40. Sorry Bob.

 

<iframe src="https://archive.org/embed/spinnakers_in_the_wind" width="640" height="480" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Amazing snapshot of 1981, a real time-warp. Thanks for posting.

Dang....I was there, and now I'm here...sitting at my damn desk.

 

1981, my best year of sailing: Transpac, Clipper Cup, PNW summer cruise, Big Boat, Antigua, Bermuda, and a dozen 2-tonners in Seattle

Friggin' youth has all the fun.

 

Console yourself with the fact that it's wasted on them. ;)

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Evergreen is the mythical unicorn here on SA. No one has ever said where she ended up or has any great photos of her.

 

 

Rumo(u)r has it Elvis has her on the hard behind the gas station in Idaho, protected by a ring of unobtanium and Old Frothingslosh.

 

 

 

 

Mike...probably right...I can't even remember where I heard the South America rumour...would have certainly added something more mysterious to the story than rotting to death on her mooring. Someone will probably find her in a warehouse somewhere with that missing Avro Arrow :-)

 

 

Interesting that so many here are still fascinated by Evergreen - I always thought it was just about the best example of the worst extremes of the IOR. It was fast when there were enough pros on board to keep the rig up, the hydraulics functioning and so forth.

 

 

Evergreen was the big boat that "did it" for me. It so captivated my imagination that I had to get off the dinghies and on to the big boats. I spent 2 hours below on Evergreen at BYC right after they won the Canada's Cup. I was in complete awe of it. I was 15. I went on to do 2 Canada's Cups after that. It was a much different regatta back then.

 

 

I think the real "appeal" of Evergreen was not that she represented the worst of IOR...but rather the most extreme of her era. She was cutting edge for her time and that was what was and still is very cool

 

 

Gawd damned...I wub SA....(wipes tear from eye)

 

I was just an ankle biting tool the first, and only, time I stepped aboard Evergreen. Right after the '79 Fastnet (for everybody that beotches how loose she was built...she still survived the deadliest yacht race).

I was six or seven years old, and started jumping up & down in the cockpit, and even I noticed the flex it had.

 

Then I looked at my Dad and said "See, even Evergreen has soft decks. Don't worry about yours!"

 

:D

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I'm hanging on every word of this thread! Excuse my ignorance here (in my defense I wasn't born during the Hey days of ior) but how come the spinnaker poles where always so far off the deck?

 

I understand why on a breezy day but in the light airs there are lots of photos with the pole and the kite so far off the deck?

 

I have a peterson36 that was born before me but I love racing her and want to get the best out of it. You guys are like a book of knowledge!

 

Ps the stories you tell are good I feel I was born too late!

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The poles were high off the deck because if they were any lower they'ed be dragging in the water as the boat rolled downwind! I saw a few poles that broke and one that took a mast down when the pole and kite went in the water to windward.

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The poles were high off the deck because if they were any lower they'ed be dragging in the water as the boat rolled downwind! I saw a few poles that broke and one that took a mast down when the pole and kite went in the water to windward.

I'd say more than a few! And they took out the lifelines and stanchions when the toppinglift broke.

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The poles were high off the deck because if they were any lower they'ed be dragging in the water as the boat rolled downwind! I saw a few poles that broke and one that took a mast down when the pole and kite went in the water to windward.

Not so much. Spins were cut to fly full and "high" with a luff length the same as for a max jib luff. And beside, I can attest that a death role, if done properly, will put the spreaders in the water and the spin pole height will not matter one whit! (Don't ask how I know this)

 

TOG

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The poles were high off the deck because if they were any lower they'ed be dragging in the water as the boat rolled downwind! I saw a few poles that broke and one that took a mast down when the pole and kite went in the water to windward.

Not so much. Spins were cut to fly full and "high" with a luff length the same as for a max jib luff. And beside, I can attest that a death role, if done properly, will put the spreaders in the water and the spin pole height will not matter one whit! (Don't ask how I know this)

 

TOG

death role?

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The poles were high off the deck because if they were any lower they'ed be dragging in the water as the boat rolled downwind! I saw a few poles that broke and one that took a mast down when the pole and kite went in the water to windward.

Back in the day the sailmakers would do anything to flog bloopers and they used to tell us that they stopped the dreaded IOR downwind rolling problem.

From my experience and from watching lots of boats that used them, they often made the rolling even worse, possibly because they distracted attention from trimming the spinnaker. We used to describe those IOR boats as " windscreen wipers" downwind.

 

I remember finishing a race in our Peterson Half Tonner downwind in a typical Port Phillip south westerly with a big sea running. We wiped out numerous times down that run to the finish, the last time just short of the line and the race officials took our time from the first part of the boat that crossed the line; the Winddex. There was some later discussion about the way in which we were timed at the finish but we convinced them that lying on its side downwind was "in its normal position" for an IOR boat of that era.

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I recently watched vid of the '69 Admirals Cup - there was plenty of major rolling going on in that pre-IOR series. I think the IOR rule and the boats got a lot of blame for what was really just carrying too much sail downwind. Funny that when a boat started rounding up, upwind, sail started getting reduced but they could be putting the spreaders in the water downwind and they'd still keep the kite up.

 

The IOR rolling phenomenon seems to me to be a bit like being the "Lucas Electrics" of the sailing world - some truth to it but it also carries the can for a lot of other contributing factors. I sailed a fairly extreme stinger stern Quarter Pounder for a decade and never experienced a death roll.

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I'm hanging on every word of this thread! Excuse my ignorance here (in my defense I wasn't born during the Hey days of ior) but how come the spinnaker poles where always so far off the deck?

 

I understand why on a breezy day but in the light airs there are lots of photos with the pole and the kite so far off the deck?

 

I have a peterson36 that was born before me but I love racing her and want to get the best out of it. You guys are like a book of knowledge!

 

Ps the stories you tell are good I feel I was born too late!

 

 

Under IOR the luffs were measured, there were girth measurements on the spinnaker too which effected the width of the kite. These measurements of the spinnaker dictated the boats rating. Bigger kite's, bigger rating...

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Thanks charisma

 

I stole the kite off my dads lotus 1280 the other day and tried it out in 5-8 knots. We set the pole just above the pulpit and shit it was quick! Now I just have to steal his spinnaker pole without him noticing!

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In the late 70's early 80's the IOR boats mainly were masthead with big kites and small mains. There was a lot of boat underwater and small little pinched sterns. These were the boats that rolled the best. Later on in the 80's most of the boats had much bigger mains and much smaller frac kites. Less boat underwater and wider sterns. These boats rolled much less, but they still rolled! Choking the sheet down near the chainplates helped with the rolling, but you could never really completely control the tendency.

 

I remember one Cowes Week going downwind in a blow on a Frers 55 with the helmsman going lock to lock on the wheel for over 30 minutes before the boat wiped out in a spectacular Chinese jybe. A guy in the back of the boat nearly bit his tongue in half when the runner block came flying around and hit him in the face!

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In the late 70's early 80's the IOR boats mainly were masthead with big kites and small mains. There was a lot of boat underwater and small little pinched sterns. These were the boats that rolled the best. Later on in the 80's most of the boats had much bigger mains and much smaller frac kites. Less boat underwater and wider sterns. These boats rolled much less, but they still rolled! Choking the sheet down near the chainplates helped with the rolling, but you could never really completely control the tendency.

 

I remember one Cowes Week going downwind in a blow on a Frers 55 with the helmsman going lock to lock on the wheel for over 30 minutes before the boat wiped out in a spectacular Chinese jybe. A guy in the back of the boat nearly bit his tongue in half when the runner block came flying around and hit him in the face!

Was Jobby sailing Jubi at that point? Is she still around somewhere?

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Looks like the Bill Cook designed Schock 41 that sailed that year but not sure. That might give you a way to look up a sail number and see if the it is consistent with the few numbers visible on the main. Race boats have changed for the better since then in a lot of ways!

There was a Schock/Cook 41 from Sarasota that raced SORC about that time, called Jubilation. I sailed on owners previos NY36 in SORC in 82. Sailed on the 41 St Pete to Isla Mujeres in 85?

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 months later...

Thread bump

 

Anybody heard anything from Larry? A trip through this thread and a glass of red wine is pure joy

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  • 1 month later...

Entered in IRC 1 for Spi Ouest this year!

 

Can't kick an old lady out of bed ....

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With several boats nearing the finish line, the boat in the center, nearest the camera, was Moonraker (35119). Her owner was Nils Muench. DYC. This was not a Mac race.

I don't recall Moonraker's designer or length.

 

 

Picture1-35.png

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I do believe this is from the One Tons held by Columbia Yacht Club July 1987. I think the boat in the lead is another Beneteau owned by Al Henning (R.I.P) named Poltergeist. His spinakers where always white with just a little red at the shoulders. I did enough time looking up at them whilst trimming them.

 

Indeed this is the '87 NA's. I think the lead boat w/red shouldered kite is Amazing Potato owned by Peggy & Lyn Comfort (the transom is J/N-ish). Also the Spuds had UK sails while the Geese had Sobstadts until the boat was purchased by Robin who then went w/UK.

 

Any other pics of the potato? Peg and Lyn were a blast to sail with. I joined the crew for a few regattas shortly after the NAs and did some bow and downwind driving. Lot's of fun.

 

 

So were you one of the Spud Studs of 1988?

 

If you were at Bayview for the 1988 One Tons, you can't for get those shirts......

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With several boats nearing the finish line, the boat in the center, nearest the camera, was Moonraker (35119). Her owner was Nils Muench. DYC. This was not a Mac race.

I don't recall Moonraker's designer or length.

 

 

Picture1-35.png

.

I do believe this is from the One Tons held by Columbia Yacht Club July 1987. I think the boat in the lead is another Beneteau owned by Al Henning (R.I.P) named Poltergeist. His spinakers where always white with just a little red at the shoulders. I did enough time looking up at them whilst trimming them.

 

Indeed this is the '87 NA's. I think the lead boat w/red shouldered kite is Amazing Potato owned by Peggy & Lyn Comfort (the transom is J/N-ish). Also the Spuds had UK sails while the Geese had Sobstadts until the boat was purchased by Robin who then went w/UK.

 

Any other pics of the potato? Peg and Lyn were a blast to sail with. I joined the crew for a few regattas shortly after the NAs and did some bow and downwind driving. Lot's of fun.

 

 

So were you one of the Spud Studs of 1988?

 

If you were at Bayview for the 1988 One Tons, you can't for get those shirts......

 

I did not make Bayview, but yes, I had a Spud Stud shirt that I wore proudly for many years. It has long since gone to meet its maker though ...

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My own reasons:

 

There was a feeling of constant and fast progress either in design or equipment: challenging!

Performance goal-posts were moving up every year (with hindsight they were not that high in the late 60s, making it easier).

Great magazine coverage which extensively featured "hero yachts" to dream of; but ..... at the same time: getting involved was easy, getting to fight in the top of the fleet with your "heroes" was not an unrealistic dream, even if you had a job aside.

And .... one could even plan putting up a competitive yacht project and still remain within the means of many reasonably wealthy owners, even with a new original design.

 

Add to this: longer race formats with shorter crews and very minimal nav instruments, you had the spice of adventure the 70's loved.

 

You hit the nail on the head PERFECTLY! For me, I'd also add the 70's/80's was also the golden age due to the fact sailing was far less 'commercial'. You only have to look at many of the racers of today and they are just named after corporations, plastered with advertising etc. Its almost like sailing has become a form of formula one car racing on the water (also witness the America's Cup - the last 'traditional' event was probably Fremantle 1987, it went all down hill from there.......).

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  • 8 months later...

attachicon.gif$(KGrHqJ,!k4E2D69214JBNrjJv7Gmw~~0_3.jpg Here's the legend of lake Ontario, Bonaventure V with a list of C&C Custom achievements back when boats were not dinghys blown up with a cad/cam programme into ugliness personified. The good old days.

Thanks for posting this - I do have a shot of the boat taken from an aircraft on the Chi Mac race from 1978 - I was a crew on the boat for a number of years from 77 till Bernie sold her. Loved the boat a LOT, loved sailing with Bernie even more.

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Those pics absolutely kicked ass.

 

I really like the old C&C 33 pics (that's what I have).

I remember seeing Thunderbolt N/M 45, Windward Passage, and I think Chiqueta at Ross Yacht Yard in Clearwter FL. My parents live down the street from the yard and Courtney Ross always had the coolest boats in his yard.

 

There were a couple of boats that I say at Ross Yachts that always intrigued me one was New Wave and it was a Tripp 40 that was a west system boat that was painted kind of a purple color with off-white deck and then I saw a guy whose name I think was Ron Rarick that had a Morgan 27 that had a Petersonish keel on it and was painted kind of a brown color with stripes fading red to yellow (very unique paint job) but, apparently the boat was really fast with the non-stock Morgan 27 keel. I think the boat was kept in Clearwater but race MORC out at DIYC way back in the day.

There was also some custom 37 foot flush deck boat with as hull based upon what looked like the Morgan 1 ton but with a dagerboard. The boats name was Big Deal......it looked rally cool.

 

My C&C came with a barely used staysail like in the pics and I kind of wondered how to fly it because it overlaps past the mast much further than any other staysail I have ever used.


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  • 1 year later...
On 6/27/2011 at 4:19 AM, Larry said:

Moonraker. Nils Muench. DYC. Erickson 39 (I believe, though Erickson 39 brings Panache to mind.)

Perhaps Moonraker was of a later design; she looks like a more radical racing design.

Maybe you guys can fill us in.

 

 

Moonraker900.png

 

 

 

Oh, I found this link. Look for Moonraker. She won quite a few awards.

 

http://www.chicagoyachtclub.org/%5Cattachments%2FRaceResults%2F20100818091702McClurg-Trophy_Winners.pdf

 

 

Perhaps somebody can tell us about the red 'M' near her bow.

 

.

Sorry to bring up an old thread, but I raced MOONRAKER for most of the 90's and early 2000's and tracked her down about 10 years ago to a guy down in San Diego, CA.  We had some communication back then, but I have not heard of her whereabouts now.  Does anyone have any idea?

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  • 8 months later...
On ‎9‎/‎8‎/‎2011 at 9:49 AM, halfmoon said:

Silver Apple of the Moon.

Saw this 1979 Ron Holland on the hard at Beaulieu (UK) this summer.

Cold moulded wood with carbon fibre 'jacket'.

post-20430-073343100 1315489571_thumb.jpg

post-20430-065837200 1315489601_thumb.jpg

post-20430-035898100 1315489617_thumb.jpg

Curious, because the Silver Apple I raced on, also based out of Beaulieu in summer was aluminum.  It was a one tonner, 37' and bottle green with a silver apple painted on the transom.  Hull shape similar, but I'm guessing they are two different boats.

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2 hours ago, 2savage said:

Curious, because the Silver Apple I raced on, also based out of Beaulieu in summer was aluminum.  It was a one tonner, 37' and bottle green with a silver apple painted on the transom.  Hull shape similar, but I'm guessing they are two different boats.

IIRC, Silver Apple, Golden Apple, and Regardless were the Irish Admiral Cup team in '79. All Holland designs, near sister ships...maybe Golden Apple was a two-tonner.  They were well-placed (leading?) team going into the Fastnet. Regardless and at least one other lost rudders in that race. I don't think third boat finished either, for some reason. Regardless had been placed 2nd or 3rd overall in individual standings?

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Silver Apple, Golden Apple names go back to half and one tonners. Later there were Big Apple, about 2 Ton in 77. Golden Apple of the Sun, and Silver Apple of the Moon were Crosshaven built wooden sisters from 79. Hugh Coveney and Clayton Love owners. Silver Apple became Rebel County, painted maroon, with a stern job.

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15 hours ago, 2savage said:

Curious, because the Silver Apple I raced on, also based out of Beaulieu in summer was aluminum.  It was a one tonner, 37' and bottle green with a silver apple painted on the transom.  Hull shape similar, but I'm guessing they are two different boats.

IIRW, that Silver Apple was a Palmer-Johnson '75 one ton raced by Holland and Pattison in the '75 one-ton, which became Spanish for the Marseilles One Ton cup, where I saw her.

It would be: '75 Silver Apple one-tonner - '76 Silver Apple H.T -  '79 Silver Apple of the Moon.

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20 hours ago, RKoch said:

IIRC, Silver Apple, Golden Apple, and Regardless were the Irish Admiral Cup team in '79. All Holland designs, near sister ships...maybe Golden Apple was a two-tonner.  They were well-placed (leading?) team going into the Fastnet. Regardless and at least one other lost rudders in that race. I don't think third boat finished either, for some reason. Regardless had been placed 2nd or 3rd overall in individual standings?

I Think the Irish Admirals cup team was actually Golden Apple of the Sun, Regardless and Inishaneer. Inishaneer was a Rogers 39, I think and was the only one of the three to complete the Fastnet, the other 2 ending up breaking rudders.   If I recall, Silver Apple of the moon raced for another country.

 

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1 hour ago, Shadowman said:

I Think the Irish Admirals cup team was actually Golden Apple of the Sun, Regardless and Inishaneer. Inishaneer was a Rogers 39, I think and was the only one of the three to complete the Fastnet, the other 2 ending up breaking rudders.   If I recall, Silver Apple of the moon raced for another country.

 

Ahhh , thanks for the correction. I couldn't find an entry list , but did find a newspaper article confirming to Innishanier on the team. Did Silver Apple sail for another team under charter? Wasn't there a year that both Apples sailed for Ireland? Or is old age starting to affect my memory....

Best recollection for 1979:

Confirmation now that Ireland was Regardless, Golden Apple, and Innishanier.

Australian team was Police Car, Impetuous, and Ragamuffin. I'm sure of that.

US team was Willwaw, Aires, and Imp (for second time). I'm about 98% sure of that.

Cant remember others...I think HK chartered boats...Vanguard was one? I think France had Revolution sailing again. Evergreen for Canada? Drawing a blank on UK and German teams.

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Recollections too of a year never to be forgotten.

HKG did not charter boats, they had Vanguard and Uin Namara,, Dubois twins built locally, and La Pantera a new Peterson built in Japan.

France had Revolution, Jubilé (former Yena II) and I believe Accanito by Joubert. Jubilé was 2nd AC (3rd overall) in the Fastnet just behind Eclipse. Revolution was 3rd or 4th AC in Fastnet, Accanito retired (rudder I think)

Silver Apple of the Moon might have raced for the Swiss, and Yes ! the daggerboarder Evergreen was there, good choice for that Fastnet ;)

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I vaguely recall Evergreen being fitted with a keel later. IOR had slammed the daggerboards by 79. Not sure if Evergreen was still DB or keel by 79 AC. Either way, I'm surprised the rig stayed up.

I sailed on Regardless a bit in late 80s, it was one sweet sailing boat. 

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9 minutes ago, fivestar said:

I have the individual country entry pages from 1973 to 1991, if someone has a particular request.

I'm curious if Silver Apple and Golden Apple both sailed for Ireland one year. '81 perhaps?

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11 minutes ago, RKoch said:

I'm curious if Silver Apple and Golden Apple both sailed for Ireland one year. '81 perhaps?

Sorry nope. 

1977: Big Apple, Golden Leigh and Irish Mist II, all Holland

1979: Golden Apple of the Sun, Regardless- Holland, Inishanier- Peterson

1981: Regardless-Holland, Wolly Jumper-Holland, Moonduster-Frers

1983: Moonduster-Frers, Justine- Castro, Storm Bird- Jones.

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1 hour ago, fivestar said:

I have the individual country entry pages from 1973 to 1991, if someone has a particular request.

I particularly request you scan and post them.  Please?  ;-)

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9 minutes ago, sledracr said:

I particularly request you scan and post them.  Please?  ;-)

I will do my best but it will take some time as I will have to do each page as one entry..

 

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6 hours ago, fivestar said:

I will do my best but it will take some time as I will have to do each page as one entry..

 

It may be easier if anyone is interested to give me their email address as some come out as JPEGs and others as pdf files.

Also with my scanner none come out below 1mb.

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8 hours ago, fivestar said:

Sorry nope. 

1977: Big Apple, Golden Leigh and Irish Mist II, all Holland

1979: Golden Apple of the Sun, Regardless- Holland, Inishanier- Peterson

1981: Regardless-Holland, Wolly Jumper-Holland, Moonduster-Frers

1983: Moonduster-Frers, Justine- Castro, Storm Bird- Jones.

1985--Justine(beneteau one tonner), Yeoman 25 (castro one tonner) can't remember 3rd. Was it some Charter Italian 46 footer

1987--Turkish Delight(castro 43), Irish Independent/full pelt and Jameson-Both Dubois 1 tonners

 

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4 minutes ago, Shadowman said:

1985--Justine(beneteau one tonner), Yeoman 25 (castro one tonner) can't remember 3rd. Was it some Charter Italian 46 footer

1987--Turkish Delight(castro 43), Irish Independent/full pelt and Jameson-Both Dubois 1 tonners

 

1985, 3rd yacht was Hero a Vallicelli 44 ex Brava which sailed for Italy in 1983.

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Had to tie the Swedish owner down to his bunk on the last night of the Fastnet.

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