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J22 Asymmetric


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I sail a J22 on an inland NC lake. I'm a 62-year-old fart, and I'm thinking about getting involved with the around-the-buoys racing. The competition is Catalinas, Hunters and Beneteaus. I think a spinnaker will be useful, however, because of skipper and crew limitations, a symmetrical spinnaker is not an option. So I have been thinking about an asymmetric.

 

Since J22s do not have sprits, separation between the main and asymmetric is a consideration. (There is a sexy kit with which you can retro-fit your 22 with a "J-Sprit", or you can jury rig some ghastly removable sprit, but I don't want to spend a lot of money or junk up my foredeck.) I am inclined to think that the asymmetrical would be dynamite. I saw some discussion about an asymmetric on a J100 without a sprit. So I am wondering what thoughts this group might have.

 

Thanks.

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Having owned one for 13 years and tried the a-kite on the bow trick, it don't work. Angles too narrow to do anything with. Even a small spirit, with a proper-sized A-kite, would have been much better. Better yet, sell it and buy a Viper. Kick asses with just main and jib...seriously. Easier to launch and retrieve as well. FYI I qualify as a "super" senior in slacker tennis, so no spring chicken here.

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I sail a J22 on an inland NC lake. I'm a 62-year-old fart, and I'm thinking about getting involved with the around-the-buoys racing. The competition is Catalinas, Hunters and Beneteaus. I think a spinnaker will be useful, however, because of skipper and crew limitations, a symmetrical spinnaker is not an option. So I have been thinking about an asymmetric.

 

Since J22s do not have sprits, separation between the main and asymmetric is a consideration. (There is a sexy kit with which you can retro-fit your 22 with a "J-Sprit", or you can jury rig some ghastly removable sprit, but I don't want to spend a lot of money or junk up my foredeck.) I am inclined to think that the asymmetrical would be dynamite. I saw some discussion about an asymmetric on a J100 without a sprit. So I am wondering what thoughts this group might have.

 

Thanks.

An asso on a symmetric pole is HARDER than a Symmetric

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I sail a J22 on an inland NC lake. I'm a 62-year-old fart, and I'm thinking about getting involved with the around-the-buoys racing. The competition is Catalinas, Hunters and Beneteaus. I think a spinnaker will be useful, however, because of skipper and crew limitations, a symmetrical spinnaker is not an option. So I have been thinking about an asymmetric.

 

Since J22s do not have sprits, separation between the main and asymmetric is a consideration. (There is a sexy kit with which you can retro-fit your 22 with a "J-Sprit", or you can jury rig some ghastly removable sprit, but I don't want to spend a lot of money or junk up my foredeck.) I am inclined to think that the asymmetrical would be dynamite. I saw some discussion about an asymmetric on a J100 without a sprit. So I am wondering what thoughts this group might have.

 

Thanks.

 

You will be slow unless its 15 -20 or reaching. there is just not enough separation between the bow and the main. I have a J/27 with two asyms and they are reach specific. plus jibing a asym means goind around the front of the headstay which is slow and a pain.

 

i think asym on this boat is so small ans simple you should reconsider

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I put some data together a while back on some boats that are marketed with an asymmetrical. I looked at J divided by LOA in an attempt to get an idea of separation between the main and bow:

 

J22: 39.1%

Morris 29: 31.1%

J80 with sprit: 59.9%

J100: 35.1%

Harbor 25: 39.2%

 

Based on this, it looks like the separation for a J22 is fairly good, except of course compared to the J80 with a sprit.

 

Comments?

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I'm a 62-year-old fart,

 

 

So, you are in the mid to young age range of J-22 racers.

 

The boat is a cinch to sail with the spinnaker it has.

 

I suggest practice...as in sail more...If you are really old you probably already retired anyway...or have lots of vacation time and sick days owed that should be used sailing...

 

I cannot imagine giving up the thrill of a reach to reach gybe in a 50 boat J-22 fleet and ten boat rounding in 25 knots on a triangular course until I am at least 80 and then I will reluctantly negotiate a position other than on the bow, or sheets.

 

Sorry... I sahll not willing contribute to or advise others in an effort to promote the pussification of society.

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I put some data together a while back on some boats that are marketed with an asymmetrical. I looked at J divided by LOA in an attempt to get an idea of separation between the main and bow:

 

J22: 39.1%

Morris 29: 31.1%

J80 with sprit: 59.9%

J100: 35.1%

Harbor 25: 39.2%

 

Based on this, it looks like the separation for a J22 is fairly good, except of course compared to the J80 with a sprit.

 

Comments?

 

J/LOA does not tell you anything about separation needed in the real world. Real world needs a sprit, and so you if you ar determined to do this, you would be better off adding one together with an oversized asym, the rating hit would probably be worth it especially if you have reaching legs. But hey, its your boat and your world.. Again no sprit plus asym will not be fun. Regular kite so small even a caveman.....

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I have a J24 set up to single hand with a RF 140 and an asym on a Selden sprit kit projecting 30". Setting and dousing single handed are pretty easy, jibing can be tricky - the slot is pretty small. Great fun for day sailing around the bay, but pretty useless for racing. Once the regular 24s can pull the pole back a foot or so, they're gone.

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I race single handed on the J22 occasionally and under 8-10 it's a rocket ship. I won last Sundays race in winds 5-10. The gybes are a little sloppy but not hard to do. The trick is to be able to lock the tiller in place for short bursts. I use an old aluminum extension with a golf club grip on the end. It can be wedged into one of the aft mooring cleats. With a little practice you can get the boat to go straight for sets and take downs. For gybes I set up with a little arc to my course. Then loosen the sheets a bit, gybe the pole, gybe the boom, back to the tiller on the new high side and correct the course. Really pretty simple. In heavy air I don't gybe. Go out in some light air, away from other boats, put on you PFD and try it.

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