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International New Ten


tprice

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An older class with a lot of potential is the International 210. A small isolated fleet at Gibson Island Maryland has made some minor changes to these excellent boats to suit them. This ambitious fellow though has gone much further. Starting with an older wood hull, he added a deeper carbon keel strut/ bulb, spade rudder in a cassette, a taller square topped rig with carbon spar, wider side decks and new cockpit interior.

We sailed it today and it is a lovely sailing boat with substantially better speed that a class 210 - although not quite as much as you'd think for a 1946 design. What would Ray Hunt think? An interesting mix of new and old that would blow the doors of an Etchells any day.

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Very nice. (although personally, my eye is still not 100% comfortable with the square-top main on a double-ender hull)

 

Akin to musicman, it reminds me of the updated Int'l 110 that Forte RTS folks did.

 

I have a set of 110 hull plans; just waiting for someone to publish an updated sailplan before putting a light cold molded hull together for it.

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Here is the write up I sent to our fleet members about the boat with some detail.

 

On Sunday, an enthusiastic fellow I've been corresponding with, brought his unique creation, "Hydra" to Gibson Island for us to look at and sail. It is a a 210 hull - a 1960s wood boat, recreated to his version of a classic yet modern daysailer. He has incorporated many of the notions and pipe dreams that have we sometimes tossed around in "what if" discussions after frostbiting

I will list a number of the novel changes he has done to his boat but first, I want to say that he has done a wonderful job of keeping the classic look of a wood racing keelboat and all aspects of the work are beautifully crafted.

Take a look at the attached photographs. In the first picture you can see the teak decks and different cockpit layout. Note the happy smiles on Tony and Murray's faces too!

There is a seating area aft with footwell for the helmsman. The center section of the cockpit is slightly raised and the forward section has a comfortable fore and aft seat that also is the "daggerboard" keel box.

The keel is a carbon fiber, 5'6" deep x 18" wide "tongue depressor" shaped fin with an 800# torpedo of lead at the bottom. This is 500# lighter than a 210 keel but because it's nearly 50% deeper it gives much greater stability. It is raised for trailer launching by a removable davit and winch. When retracted it's bulb is up against the bottom of the hull and the fin towers up over the deck.

The rudder is a modern looking shape, over 4' deep, all carbon in a cassette that is removable from the hull for trailer launching. There is no skeg. The boat turns in less than it's own length!

The mast is a carbon wonder, hinged at the deck. It can be easily raised by simply walking it up and probably weighs about 30 lbs. It's several ft taller than a 210 spar and much stiffer. The mainsail foot is about 3 ft shorter than ours and the head of the sail is square - meaning it comes straight out from the mast, then down in a gentle roach. The gaff rig rises again! (see next photo). The mast has been moved about 6" aft and the forestay about a foot forward, giving a substantially larger jib. It is self tacking on a radiused track just forward of the mast. Nothing has to be done when tacking! The jib is on a furler so getting under way is simple. The mainsail is attached to the mast with sliders and would be kept there. No blasted feeding of the boltrope into the mast slot!

Other unique features are halyard jammers and a single winch to supply power for tightening halyards etc (instead or multi purchase systems like we have). The boat is rigged for an asymmetrical, masthead spinnaker and has a 4' tapered carbon bowsprit. We didn't try the spinnaker as all the gear wasn't yet fitted. I hear it's black with a gold "Hydra" emblazoned on it.

Seeing it sail, there is no doubt that it's a 210 distant cousin. It retains the sense of the boat. Court took out his boat and sailed along side for a while. It was very interesting that although we were slightly faster, the GI 210s seem to be creditably speedy. I think that downwind the New Ten "Hydra" would be a true rocket ship and give a Melges 24 or any modern boat a run for it's money- (upwind). Upwind, "Hydra" would be more powerful than our 210s and carry that square topped mainsail well.

But sliding along in the harbor on a Sunday afternoon in light air, just like our boats, it was a comfortable, steady sweet ride, turning heads and just dialing up anyone lucky enough to be aboard, sense of calm.

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I think Forte consulted in the 210 project too.

People do ask "why a 210?" it's one of the few classic keelboats able to respond to these types of modern improvements. It's light weight and unusual shape make it adaptable (as opposed to say, an IOD or Dragon). As an aside, there are tons of "non competitive" Stars that can be gotten for a song. The Star hull would be a wonderful platform to play with to make a classic daysailer. (it's fine on 's own but kind of a handful!) In France, I've seen lovely Star adaptations where they put "Edwardian" gaff rigs and bowsprits on and have fun, totally impractical gaffers that sail nicely.

Here's a pic of the 110 "Got Wood" from 2006.

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My first keelboat was a 110.

 

I owned that boat when the bridge deck had a "snubber" winch on it...was a while ago.

 

It was not long after Harken introduced their Hexaratchets...and clam cleats replaced the snubber.

 

I redid that wood boat with a different sheeting for the larger jibs and set the mast to us traps. I replaced the center 8 feet and sanded the wood down 1/8 inch and glassed it.

 

Sheeting and traps were roundly pooh-poohed by the Saginaw/San Diego rulers of that class.

 

Those rigs were approved and incorporated a few years later...

 

For the money and the sheer simplicity, speed, and the fun of sailing, the 110 is the max even today.

 

That said, the 210 may be even more so...save the lack of a quick plane...wonderful to see these Hunt designs show how very well designed they are and remain as competitive as any keeler in the water.

 

Should have been in the Olys long ago, but now more so than most "approved" boats.

 

I may sound old fashion, but I think the 110 would sail circles around most sport boats, and the 210 just might eclipse more venerable Etchells and similar keelers, being much classier besides...what goes around, comes around...

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The 110 class had a discussion going recently about a I14 rig being placed on the 110. I hope this link works but if not, it's easy to find on Facebook if you look for the 110 class.

 

https://www.facebook.com/#!/photo.php?fbid=2290920188387&set=o.135090796850&type=1&theater

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... ...

 

I may sound old fashion, but I think the 110 would sail circles around most sport boats

 

... ...

 

How many sportsboats have you sailed, or sailed against, or even sailed in company with?

 

I suspect you have not had an eye-opening experience. The 110 is a zippy boat yes but

 

FB- Doug

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I see the main is loose footed...any comments pro or con?

 

Makes no difference except for being way easier to rig. All our 210s here are loose footed. Not Class legal...yet.

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never sailed a 110 but agree that a true sport boat would plane away. The 210 front half tries gamely to plane but the back half says no thanks and sinks, leaving a narrow groove in the wake! Goes pretty fast though.

 

 

 

... ...

 

I may sound old fashion, but I think the 110 would sail circles around most sport boats

 

... ...

 

How many sportsboats have you sailed, or sailed against, or even sailed in company with?

 

I suspect you have not had an eye-opening experience. The 110 is a zippy boat yes but

 

FB- Doug

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Steamer, relax, just an observation.

 

For me, you have a sport boat that moves like a C-boat, then I know the 110 will hang in there. C-boats are extremely swift sailboats.

 

I used to run against Cs in those heady days and Cs did not take the chop well and we could slip by without trap, smooth water was different, but not so much when trap was up.

 

The 110 is flat on the bottom, save keel and rudder, and it does plane and drives well upwind; whereas its bigger sister has more of a keeler underside, but with flat foreword sections. I just love those things.

 

Hyderally, Thanks for comments on the loose foot. I was thinking that the loose foot might be a bit less powerful, without being attached to the boom...learning here.

 

 

Should be a statue of C Raymond somewhere.

 

And thanks for the rig link...WCB. 'Obliged.

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The carbon IOD rig up in NEH is really a long needed mod to squelch all the whining from folks complaining that so and so's mast is much lighter than theirs etc etc. They need to just get on with it... not as if that particular fleet is economically distressed in any sense. As far as 110's an sport boats go, I have to say that it does quite admirably. I race on a modified 110 that sports a masthead Asymmetric, along with double trapezes, and in the right conditions, it can keep up with all kinds of newer boats. The 110 planes readily, and we have hit 18.5 kts while planing. Not bad for an old wood boat from 1957 (designed in '39) . Certainly represents some cheap thrills, and the best part is that we are only a crew of two. A couple of weekends ago in the around Coanicut island race we hit 15.5 kts, while friends of ours racing a Melges 32 that day maxed out at 16.5. Because of the overall weight of the boat, we probably are not going to be outright as fast in most conditions, but we can certainly keep up, and at times outpace modern sportboats. In last years CYC around the island race, we beat the scratch boat in our class, a J80, on elapsed time whilst starting about 5 minutes late. When we passed them we both had our kites up (this is when all we had was a fractional Asail) and we just blew by them... or in the words of Hyderally We just planed away.

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Loved the Waterwitch when she was at the Annap Boat Show!. Interesting comparison. Ray Hunt was all about economy (most boat for the buck). Waterwitch seems to be about burning money. Both put modern keels and rigs on traditional looking hulls.Long, skinny boats have appeal. What would Freud say?

 

They're playing with a carbon rig for an IOD up in Maine but it's not the same thing as these mods. Have you ever seen the Waterwitch? Looks like a Sq Meter boat but with a strut and torpedo bulb, etc.

 

http://waterwitchyac....com/?p=gallery

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Loved the Waterwitch when she was at the Annap Boat Show!. Interesting comparison. Ray Hunt was all about economy (most boat for the buck). Waterwitch seems to be about burning money. Both put modern keels and rigs on traditional looking hulls.Long, skinny boats have appeal. What would Freud say?

 

They're playing with a carbon rig for an IOD up in Maine but it's not the same thing as these mods. Have you ever seen the Waterwitch? Looks like a Sq Meter boat but with a strut and torpedo bulb, etc.

 

http://waterwitchyac....com/?p=gallery

 

Freud? Long? Skinny? I know her...can't recall the name. I know, Crossbow, but she was catty. Sorry. I never hung out... :]

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The 110 class had a discussion going recently about a I14 rig being placed on the 110. I hope this link works but if not, it's easy to find on Facebook if you look for the 110 class.

 

https://www.facebook...&type=1

 

The above implied a 14 type rig, but no traps...conversation re racks. That does not seem logical to me.

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The carbon IOD rig up in NEH is really a long needed mod to squelch all the whining from folks complaining that so and so's mast is much lighter than theirs etc etc. They need to just get on with it... not as if that particular fleet is economically distressed in any sense. As far as 110's an sport boats go, I have to say that it does quite admirably. I race on a modified 110 that sports a masthead Asymmetric, along with double trapezes, and in the right conditions, it can keep up with all kinds of newer boats. The 110 planes readily, and we have hit 18.5 kts while planing. Not bad for an old wood boat from 1957 (designed in '39) . Certainly represents some cheap thrills, and the best part is that we are only a crew of two. A couple of weekends ago in the around Coanicut island race we hit 15.5 kts, while friends of ours racing a Melges 32 that day maxed out at 16.5. Because of the overall weight of the boat, we probably are not going to be outright as fast in most conditions, but we can certainly keep up, and at times outpace modern sportboats. In last years CYC around the island race, we beat the scratch boat in our class, a J80, on elapsed time whilst starting about 5 minutes late. When we passed them we both had our kites up (this is when all we had was a fractional Asail) and we just blew by them... or in the words of Hyderally We just planed away.

 

The masthead A sail must do ALOT for that boat. I grew up sailing 110's and they were never that fast.

They would plane and were relatively fast on a reach, but W/L they were not anywhere close to being as fast as a Melges 24. I think they rate about 150ish PHRF.

 

110's give an illusion of being faster than what they really are because you are sailing very close to the water.

 

Still a great boat and very fast for it's day.

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IMHO, modifying a single boat from an golden oldie class can be fun, but you don't want to declare a new, turbo-ed class unless the whole fleet is going to make the transition to the new rules. I doubt that's going to happen here.

 

And what would Ray Hunt have thought? Well, he was innovative and willing to push the envelope, as he did in powerboats with famous success. I doubt he would have wanted to compromise with the past, and would have wanted completely new design. Any designer would. That's what they do.

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The carbon IOD rig up in NEH is really a long needed mod to squelch all the whining from folks complaining that so and so's mast is much lighter than theirs etc etc. They need to just get on with it... not as if that particular fleet is economically distressed in any sense. As far as 110's an sport boats go, I have to say that it does quite admirably. I race on a modified 110 that sports a masthead Asymmetric, along with double trapezes, and in the right conditions, it can keep up with all kinds of newer boats. The 110 planes readily, and we have hit 18.5 kts while planing. Not bad for an old wood boat from 1957 (designed in '39) . Certainly represents some cheap thrills, and the best part is that we are only a crew of two. A couple of weekends ago in the around Coanicut island race we hit 15.5 kts, while friends of ours racing a Melges 32 that day maxed out at 16.5. Because of the overall weight of the boat, we probably are not going to be outright as fast in most conditions, but we can certainly keep up, and at times outpace modern sportboats. In last years CYC around the island race, we beat the scratch boat in our class, a J80, on elapsed time whilst starting about 5 minutes late. When we passed them we both had our kites up (this is when all we had was a fractional Asail) and we just blew by them... or in the words of Hyderally We just planed away.

 

The masthead A sail must do ALOT for that boat. I grew up sailing 110's and they were never that fast.

They would plane and were relatively fast on a reach, but W/L they were not anywhere close to being as fast as a Melges 24. I think they rate about 150ish PHRF.

 

110's give an illusion of being faster than what they really are because you are sailing very close to the water.

 

Still a great boat and very fast for it's day.

 

When I was sailing a 10 the boat would come alive and plane easily in 10 + knots and with traps it would really cruise...before they were legal...

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Semi,

That's a great comment and I agree completely. The modified 210 shown, is a custom boat for entering wooden boat competitions and not an attempt to "improve" the existing class. It stands on it's own - but should be of interest to the 210 Class.

That said, it is interesting to answer the question of "how would this classic hull do with an updated rig and foils?"

Another thing is that it is important for all classes to keep an open mind towards steady and sensible improvements to keep them interesting to sail and competitive with other emerging classes (it is a market out there after all).

 

 

 

 

IMHO, modifying a single boat from an golden oldie class can be fun, but you don't want to declare a new, turbo-ed class unless the whole fleet is going to make the transition to the new rules. I doubt that's going to happen here.

 

And what would Ray Hunt have thought? Well, he was innovative and willing to push the envelope, as he did in powerboats with famous success. I doubt he would have wanted to compromise with the past, and would have wanted completely new design. Any designer would. That's what they do.

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The 110 class had a discussion going recently about a I14 rig being placed on the 110. I hope this link works but if not, it's easy to find on Facebook if you look for the 110 class.

 

https://www.facebook...&type=1

 

The above implied a 14 type rig, but no traps...conversation re racks. That does not seem logical to me.

 

Just because the traps weren't mentioned, I wouldn't assume they aren't in the plan. I can tell you that the question isn't if, it's how many, 1 or 2. Mostly the discussion was based on changing the sailplan, a square head main, shorter foot and a jib with little to no overlap. Drawing trap wires on that nice sail plan would just clutter it up.

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