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65- by 32-foot catamaran 3200sqft of living space


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I can assure you, nothing was added to The Rod's replies.   Perhaps sharing my reverence for The Rod, as well as my deep appreciation for the journalistic accomplishments of my Sailing Anarchy predece

And wtf happened to lil'murray.......?

Guy did not grow a vagin! Mr. Hot is full of merde! The only place Mr. Hot has seen a double hurricane is in La Nouvelle Orléans. 

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It will float fine... Anyone who has cruised has seen all kinds of waterworld creations. Hell, Cubans set up .big ass floating islands in intl wawa while waiting for the right window. I say it floats and is moderately a better vessel than a Hunter or BendyToy.

Yes but to the Cubans credit, they tend to lash their rafts together. While lashing is not high tech it is very effective. The Polynesians found that out a thousand years ago. Hell even this monstrosity crossed the Atlantc.

matarangiIIatsea.jpg

 

Dry wall screws on the other hand;

bay-bridge-debris.jpg

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Kinda thinking my two threads I started have me in the top of the thread votes. This thread and the Clear Lake disaster where I feel like the Sailing community came together and did make a big difference in the Clear Lake frame up job.

 

LOL this one for sure is very interesting.. Curious to see what happens

 

Go the Hot Rod!!!

 

I'd agree those were 2 good threads, but AAs contribution of the "I'm pounding a vodka drink" has legs..

 

one word : Frank.

two words : Fourth Mode

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First rule of SA. We don't talk about Frank.

 

 

Only "Guy" may bring up that name

 

as he tents to MrsUse it ;)

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Hey! Please do not put me in the camp ridiculing Hotrod. I applaud the guy and wish him the best. Fact is I have no skills with tools at all. I'm hopeless at building anything. I can draw it but I can't build it. I've hung 60 half models on my new walls at the shack and I don't think I ever hit a stud. I once built a fence and it came out OK.

 

I am in awe of this guys drive. But I think all that energy and money may have been better spent if he had some professional design help from a competant mutihull designer. I would hate to see his dreams crushed.

 

 

Hey! Please do not put me in the camp ridiculing Hotrod. I applaud the guy and wish him the best. Fact is I have no skills with tools at all. I'm hopeless at building anything. I can draw it but I can't build it. I've hung 60 half models on my new walls at the shack and I don't think I ever hit a stud. I once built a fence and it came out OK.

 

I am in awe of this guys drive. But I think all that energy and money may have been better spent if he had some professional design help from a competant mutihull designer. I would hate to see his dreams crushed.

Nice one Bob. I don't see it happening but I wish the guy a 6 on the poll. Live the dream. Even if it doesn't come completely true and I bet you've designed a few "Dogs" in your day as well.

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Hey! Please do not put me in the camp ridiculing Hotrod. I applaud the guy and wish him the best. Fact is I have no skills with tools at all. I'm hopeless at building anything. I can draw it but I can't build it. I've hung 60 half models on my new walls at the shack and I don't think I ever hit a stud. I once built a fence and it came out OK.

 

I am in awe of this guys drive. But I think all that energy and money may have been better spent if he had some professional design help from a competant mutihull designer. I would hate to see his dreams crushed.

 

 

>Hey! Please do not put me in the camp ridiculing Hotrod. I applaud the guy and wish him the best. Fact is I have no skills with tools at all. I'm hopeless at building anything. I can draw it but I can't build it. I've hung 60 half models on my new walls at the shack and I don't think I ever hit a stud. I once built a fence and it came out OK.

 

I am in awe of this guys drive. But I think all that energy and money may have been better spent if he had some professional design help from a competant mutihull designer. I would hate to see his dreams crushed.

Nice one Bob. I don't see it happening but I wish the guy a 6 on the poll. Live the dream. Even if it doesn't come completely true and I bet you've designed a few "Dogs" in your day as well.

 

 

that was a Hot Rod like post

 

a Fail for execution reguardles of intentions :)

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Just for the hell of it I google earthed the marina. There it is! Holy shit does it look big.

 

Copy and paste this in the earth search bar:

37 58.437 n 122 28.964 w

 

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=126442&page=11#entry4094619

Posted 31 March 2013 - 07:31 PM

 

Chart from here: http://marine.geogarage.com/routes

 

hotrod_chart1.jpg

 

hotrod_chart2.jpg

 

hotrod_ramp.jpg

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Just for the hell of it I google earthed the marina. There it is! Holy shit does it look big.

 

Copy and paste this in the earth search bar:

37 58.437 n 122 28.964 w

 

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=126442&page=11#entry4094619

Posted 31 March 2013 - 07:31 PM

 

Chart from here: http://marine.geogarage.com/routes

 

 

 

 

 

hotrod_ramp.jpg

 

I was about to change my vote, until I realized the brilliance this shot (shop) shows: all he has to do is get it to the top of the ramp, and he can log roller it in, guided by the docks on the sides! A right ship launching down the slipway! How she lands is the question. I'm guessing the moment of truth is when one end of the boat is supported on land and the other is starting to float; the forces trying to break it in half. Similar to charging head on into a big wave (I wonder what the equivalent wave would be?).

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Thats the stealth model. It has no shadow. A 4 out of 10 photoshop. Wait till he has to turn slightly right to clear the marina entrance. That sucker will be crazy ivaning with broken plywood rudders within minutes. Do you think the marina will want to see his insurance before letting him onto the ramp ? Oh hang on, its a macgregor launching nest. scrap that.

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Thats the stealth model. It has no shadow. A 4 out of 10 photoshop.

 

I wasn't trying to fool anyone, just measure the boat width relative to the launch ramp as accurately as I could. A long trailer could get the boat into the water.

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Thats the stealth model. It has no shadow. A 4 out of 10 photoshop.

 

I wasn't trying to fool anyone, just measure the boat width relative to the launch ramp as accurately as I could. A long trailer could get the boat into the water.

 

 

the trick will be to get the trailer out without the debris

 

That POS will Never Float on one end while being held out of the water at the other

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That pos will sit on the ramp, while Hotrod attempts repairs between the tides, until finally the mcgregor guys bulldoze the bits into a KKK style bbq, and lynch the sucker for blocking the ramp. Id pay good money to be the bulldozer driver, but Id start with the furthest away Mcgregor in the hardstand.... Cant let THAT opportunity go by...

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Hey guys! What gives?

 

Someone asleep at the switch there? Who dropped the ball?

 

Just went to Google Maps. Distant view still shows hotrod's fancy on its building site.

 

New, 3D hi-res view shows empty, bulldozed lot.

 

Went to street view. Nada!

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Under the cover of night,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Yeah maybe! Wouldn't be the first time an architectural treasure has been accidentally demolished by a rogue unmanned bullozer overnight.

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The Google earth pic shows that the logs on the carpark side, directly in front of where the bow used to be, have been disturbed, and there are track marks leaving the plot in that area and across the plot apparently tidying it up. No sign of a recent bonfire, no floating debris and nothing parked nearby. He has either trucked the bits out of the area for more work, donated it to the Salvo's as a 65 x 32 jigsaw puzzle or engaged stealth mode. Someone living nearby should ring Arena Yacht Sales and get the goss. Enquiring minds need to know. New Zealand has gone to magenta alert and there are unconfirmed reports that it was aerial dropped over North Korea.

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"Has any mentioned that there is a Mac dealer at this marina? Yes there trailers of them, zoom in"

 

yep posted pics ages ago - and as was noted earlier, it's quite a remarkable hillbilly oasis in affluent east san Rafael

 

that being said - travel a bit further on the access road and you come to an active brick factory - a bit industrial for southern marin county

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Don't worry the big cat is still on the hard!

 

While I have far better things to do I just registered for this forum in order to respond to this thread. I live right up the street from the marina and have been a daily witness to this folly from the begining. What a waste!

 

Anyway, as of an hour ago "das boat' was on its cribbing and all seemed quiet. Several days ago some black bottom paint was added to both hulls. It looks like he is figuring on about 18" of draft.

 

Launch can't be long now.

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Don't worry the big cat is still on the hard!

 

While I have far better things to do I just registered for this forum in order to respond to this thread. I live right up the street from the marina and have been a daily witness to this folly from the begining. What a waste!

 

Anyway, as of an hour ago "das boat' was on its cribbing and all seemed quiet. Several days ago some black bottom paint was added to both hulls. It looks like he is figuring on about 18" of draft.

 

Launch can't be long now.

 

Thanks. Good to know we have an Anarchist on scene.

 

My error, it seems. I kinda took it as read that the new up-close hi-def 3D views on Google earth would be the most recent but as Thing1 noted, the Street View shot is labelled as 2008 vintage.

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Don't worry the big cat is still on the hard!

 

While I have far better things to do I just registered for this forum in order to respond to this thread. I live right up the street from the marina and have been a daily witness to this folly from the begining. What a waste!

 

Anyway, as of an hour ago "das boat' was on its cribbing and all seemed quiet. Several days ago some black bottom paint was added to both hulls. It looks like he is figuring on about 18" of draft.

 

Launch can't be long now.

 

Ironic. The best way to describe the content of these forums is a hand-built plywood catamaran held together by drywall screws, built by an amateur (no offense Dawg or has Ed started to pay you?),destined to sink at some point.

 

Welcome. Someone will be along shortly to explain the rules.

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Don't worry the big cat is still on the hard!

 

While I have far better things to do I just registered for this forum in order to respond to this thread. I live right up the street from the marina and have been a daily witness to this folly from the begining. What a waste!

 

Anyway, as of an hour ago "das boat' was on its cribbing and all seemed quiet. Several days ago some black bottom paint was added to both hulls. It looks like he is figuring on about 18" of draft.

 

Launch can't be long now.

Ironic. The best way to describe the content of these forums is a hand-built plywood catamaran held together by drywall screws, built by an amateur (no offense Dawg or has Ed started to pay you?),destined to sink at some point.

 

Welcome. Someone will be along shortly to explain the rules.

The rules:

 

1. Pics or it didn't happen.

 

2. Fuck off.

 

3. Show us your wife or girlfriend's tits.

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Don't worry the big cat is still on the hard!

 

While I have far better things to do I just registered for this forum in order to respond to this thread. I live right up the street from the marina and have been a daily witness to this folly from the begining. What a waste!

 

Anyway, as of an hour ago "das boat' was on its cribbing and all seemed quiet. Several days ago some black bottom paint was added to both hulls. It looks like he is figuring on about 18" of draft.

 

Launch can't be long now.

Ironic. The best way to describe the content of these forums is a hand-built plywood catamaran held together by drywall screws, built by an amateur (no offense Dawg or has Ed started to pay you?),destined to sink at some point.

 

Welcome. Someone will be along shortly to explain the rules.

The rules:

 

1. Pics or it didn't happen.

 

2. Fuck off.

 

3. Show us your wife or girlfriend's tits.

 

 

simple enough -_-

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Don't worry the big cat is still on the hard!

 

While I have far better things to do I just registered for this forum in order to respond to this thread. I live right up the street from the marina and have been a daily witness to this folly from the begining. What a waste!

 

Anyway, as of an hour ago "das boat' was on its cribbing and all seemed quiet. Several days ago some black bottom paint was added to both hulls. It looks like he is figuring on about 18" of draft.

 

Launch can't be long now.

 

Ironic. The best way to describe the content of these forums is a hand-built plywood catamaran held together by drywall screws, built by an amateur (no offense Dawg or has Ed started to pay you?),destined to sink at some point.

 

Welcome. Someone will be along shortly to explain the rules.

 

Screw that! He's on the job, the SA on-the-spot tangerine-box-cat reporter.

 

Full pardon from the welcome wagon, if anything we should send him donations to send us regular video updates.

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painted the bottom 18 inches black ? Surely not the buffed up chequerplate ramming devices too ? That would be the first 20 litre pail out of this months benefits cheque. The next 18 inches happens next month unless a russian vodka company steps up... Maersk shipping have already posted pictures of the boat and the mother in law so they can aVOID THE HO and issued the debris ramming alert..... wheelchairs and drywall screws are nasty fkrs to hit with 150,000 tonnes of steel travelling at 20 knots. Especially when painted black.

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Don't worry the big cat is still on the hard!

 

While I have far better things to do I just registered for this forum in order to respond to this thread. I live right up the street from the marina and have been a daily witness to this folly from the begining. What a waste!

 

Anyway, as of an hour ago "das boat' was on its cribbing and all seemed quiet. Several days ago some black bottom paint was added to both hulls. It looks like he is figuring on about 18" of draft.

 

Launch can't be long now.

 

thanks for the update! let's get some updated pictures all up in here!

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Under the cover of night,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Yeah maybe! Wouldn't be the first time an architectural treasure has been accidentally demolished by a rogue unmanned bullozer overnight.

Where's Mayor Daley when you need him? D9s at midnight a speciality.

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I tingle all over in anticipation of this debris field waiting to occur.

 

 

After living thru "Raw Faith", this is even more apparently a disaster-in-the-making.

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First rule of SA. We don't talk about Frank.

 

 

Only "Guy" may bring up that name

 

as he tents to MrsUse it ;)

 

Guy doesn't even let Mrs Frank speak of Mr Frank.

 

Guy wishes to have a talk with Mr Hot. Thinking this design of his may be a more stable platform for AC racing come this Summer?

 

Huzzah!

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Wow, what a train wreck. But most people who get the bug fare no better. I have finished a buch of smaller boats the "largest" being a 24 ft tri. A couple being nice self designed boats. Chump change.

 

Completion rates on multihulls don't even come close to ten percent. Newick told me that the percentage of people who never even started the plans they bought was about 90%. The haircut on failures to launch is probably about the same. Newick's Pat's had cheery launch date predictions for years, and who better than him?

 

There are many things that lead to failure of the wider dream. Builds take so long for many people that they aren't the same person by the completion date. And few people have a rational plan to start with. About the only thing this guy has right is the stick-to-it-ness. That is rare enough, but it leaves him a laughing stock, when few people are any more successful, they just fail for different but equally self-deluding reasons. And most people never start at all, for better or worse.

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Wow, what a train wreck. But most people who get the bug fare no better. I have finished a buch of smaller boats the "largest" being a 24 ft tri. A couple being nice self designed boats. Chump change.

 

Completion rates on multihulls don't even come close to ten percent. Newick told me that the percentage of people who never even started the plans they bought was about 90%. The haircut on failures to launch is probably about the same. Newick's Pat's had cheery launch date predictions for years, and who better than him?

 

There are many things that lead to failure of the wider dream. Builds take so long for many people that they aren't the same person by the completion date. And few people have a rational plan to start with. About the only thing this guy has right is the stick-to-it-ness. That is rare enough, but it leaves him a laughing stock, when few people are any more successful, they just fail for different but equally self-deluding reasons. And most people never start at all, for better or worse.

 

It's true. He deserves credit for starting and then finishing it, pretty quickly too, regardless than it's 90% condo, 10% boat.

 

I started my own strip boat project, I don't see when I'll get any farther on it, too many other things in the way. When I realize that I'm one of the masses who didn't finish, it makes me hope that Hotrod's boat holds together for him.

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Wow, what a train wreck. But most people who get the bug fare no better. I have finished a buch of smaller boats the "largest" being a 24 ft tri. A couple being nice self designed boats. Chump change.

 

Completion rates on multihulls don't even come close to ten percent. Newick told me that the percentage of people who never even started the plans they bought was about 90%. The haircut on failures to launch is probably about the same. Newick's Pat's had cheery launch date predictions for years, and who better than him?

 

There are many things that lead to failure of the wider dream. Builds take so long for many people that they aren't the same person by the completion date. And few people have a rational plan to start with. About the only thing this guy has right is the stick-to-it-ness. That is rare enough, but it leaves him a laughing stock, when few people are any more successful, they just fail for different but equally self-deluding reasons. And most people never start at all, for better or worse.

 

It's true. He deserves credit for starting and then finishing it, pretty quickly too, regardless than it's 90% condo, 10% boat.

 

I started my own strip boat project, I don't see when I'll get any farther on it, too many other things in the way. When I realize that I'm one of the masses who didn't finish, it makes me hope that Hotrod's boat holds together for him.

 

 

fixed

 

You were on a roll

 

HR will only feel a slight "overall roll"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

before he's in the drink ;)

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It's easier to move it in Photoshop than across the land.

 

If I was one of the boat owners in that marina, especially in the slips that face the launch ramp, I wuld be very worried abotu my boat getting hit by the floating material after the launch.

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When that POS is dumped onto the only available launching ramp for miles, found that it cant float, and so set fire to in situ, it will be a thousand times worse than having a flaming "parcel" left on your doorstep. Try stomping that flaming mess out with your fluffy slippers and its guaranteed you will cop a screwed foot and an inability to use the ramp for months. (Which might be a good thing considering that everything else that wants to use it are McGregors...)

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If HR flipped it over (gently) onto the water

 

it might make a Kool Monohull Deck Boat

 

if ya stayed away from the sides <_<

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Just went by the Ark Beast. Still high and dry, looks as ready as it ever will, he's got a lot of junk stored under it and I would think he would move it when it's splash time (or sink). Noticed night nav lights on it for those moonless nights at sea or for the divers to see it at the bottom of the murky bay.post-11674-0-20708900-1368579172_thumb.jpg

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Don't know why my photo shows sideways? Help?

 

 

just a little early for sideways

 

you may have the only pic to come of it

 

not sitting level on the hard

 

 

 

 

 

in one piece :o

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Some updates for the curious. I am going to refrain from much in the way of editorial comment and just try to report what I have personally seen and heard.

 

 

painted the bottom 18 inches black ? Surely not the buffed up chequerplate ramming devices too ? That would be the first 20 litre pail out of this months benefits cheque. The next 18 inches happens next month unless a russian vodka company steps up... Maersk shipping have already posted pictures of the boat and the mother in law so they can aVOID THE HO and issued the debris ramming alert..... wheelchairs and drywall screws are nasty fkrs to hit with 150,000 tonnes of steel travelling at 20 knots. Especially when painted black.

 

In my original post I did write that the black bottom paint covers about 18 inches. It could be as much as 20 or so. Yes the bottom two thirds of the "ramming plates" you speak of are now black and the upper portions are that yellow color of the rest of the "boat". The bottom paint speaks to an interesting issue of the waterline. It has been written in this forum that a rough projected waterline is probably more like 2 feet plus. Today in a conversation with one of the builders on the site this person said thay viewed the bottom paint as more than enough because they "figured the boat would only draw about a foot." When I asked how they determined the waterline the response was: "Eh er...er..it's length times....... er ah, well there is a formula. Its easy to figure out because they are displacement hulls."

 

 

...........

 

Completion rates on multihulls don't even come close to ten percent. Newick told me that the percentage of people who never even started the plans they bought was about 90%. The haircut on failures to launch is probably about the same. Newick's Pat's had cheery launch date predictions for years, and who better than him?

 

There are many things that lead to failure of the wider dream. Builds take so long for many people that they aren't the same person by the completion date. And few people have a rational plan to start with. About the only thing this guy has right is the stick-to-it-ness. That is rare enough, but it leaves him a laughing stock, when few people are any more successful, they just fail for different but equally self-deluding reasons. And most people never start at all, for better or worse.

 

It's true. He deserves credit for starting and then finishing it, pretty quickly too, regardless than it's 90% condo, 10% boat.

 

I started my own strip boat project, I don't see when I'll get any farther on it, too many other things in the way. When I realize that I'm one of the masses who didn't finish, it makes me hope that Hotrod's boat holds together for him.

 

I do have one editorial comment to make and that is I think that the discussions here even in mild praise of this effort for merely finishing often misses an important point. The options in this case were not limited to starting something and finishing anything. There is so much knowlege and expertise in boat building here in the bay area, and what troubles me and others I have spoken to about this project is that so little genuine expertise seems to have been brought to bear on this project. In fact many have reported that the builder has been resistent to the counsel and advice of several well qualified people. Merely finishing something, ie. anything, especially when the very real possibility existed of finishing, at bare minimum, something of solid functional utility, seems like a genuine tradgedy. All this effort does seem to be folly. This said I have come to conclude that despite the tradgedy of wasted labor and the possible human tradgedy that may ultimately unfold when this thing goes in the water I don't think the people involved in this project deserve the ridicule that has been dished out against them. Frankly in my opinion its just not the civilized or human thing to do. I remain hopefull that these people will learn some important and not too seriously consequential lessons as they go forward, as it does seem to be their intent to proceed.

 

 

When that POS is dumped onto the only available launching ramp for miles, found that it cant float, and so set fire to in situ, it will be a thousand times worse than having a flaming "parcel" left on your doorstep. Try stomping that flaming mess out with your fluffy slippers and its guaranteed you will cop a screwed foot and an inability to use the ramp for months. (Which might be a good thing considering that everything else that wants to use it are McGregors...)

 

Okay now to some news and possible observations regarding the apparently likely launching. Again, with no editorial observations on my part. Just the facts as I heard and saw them.

 

- Today I asked someone who I believe is the son of the owner when they were planning on launching. He said 'very soon, maybe even unter the cover of night' (He was laughing when he said this.) and if I wanted any photos before the boat was in the water I shouldn't wait around.

- The fellow I spoke to also said that once the boat was in the water it would remain near the fuel dock in the harbor for 5 days before they left. I do believe they are planning to cross the bay to Richmond to fit the interior. He said they were very much in need of flooring and plumbing fixtures. I asked if he meant 'regular household type stuff, and would functional used be okay? He said yah sure bring it by.

- The last thing thing I've seen added on the boat are some struts under the bidge deck supporting and spreading the lower bowsprit shrouds. I will try to get some pictures.

- I am sorry but I haven't seen any discussion of the "sail plan" for this thing. Again from the person I spoke to: " We're planning on about 1650 sq. feet of sail area. The largest portion in the form of a 600 sq.ft genny". He seemed to think this total was a lot and I said that it didn't seem like that much for a vessel of this size. "Oh no he said. We're thinking we might make 20-25 knots with what we will have. I observed some features of the rig and said that it looked like they were planning on flying a pretty big lateen sail between the masts. He confirmed it and jestured toward a late middle aged women there (maybe the mom) and said that she was the sailmaker, and had yet to start the lateen. He said they are all going to be dacron, probably from recycled material. He might have been pulling my leg but he seemed serious, and this would suggest to me that they're thinking its going to be a while before they think they will be taking any long voyages.

- At this time the boat is blocked up on a vey long makeshift three axel trailer that appears made from a salvaged portable building or mobile home steel substructure. I am sure there is material for a joke here that I will leave up to the commedians. Interestingly the tongue end of this "trailer" is positioned at the aft end of the boat. So it would appear that they are planning to launce bow in first.

 

I will try to be on the scene when this thing goes in the water, and I will try and get some other photos up as I am able, If I do see something going on as I head to and from work I will at least try and get a heads up posted.

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Dear Hotrod, don't pay any attention to these philistine naysayers.

 

Clearly a man capable of conceiving and executing such a project and with your house framing experience has installed sufficient bracing to hold your vessel together. I am sure that the 4 x 2’s and gal bolts seen in the early construction photos were just construction fasteners and that by now substantial bulkheads have been installed.

 

Experienced commentators would have recognised the angular construction of the deck house as part of your sophisticated structural design and not as the uniformed have suggested due to its stealth properties.

 

Thank you for the entertainment you have provided so far and long may it continue, I look forward to a successful launch and your maiden international voyage. Five ton of exterior grade plywood, a few gallons of liquid nails, 10 years’ worth of scrounged tek screws all coated in waterproofing compound, what could possibly go wrong?

 

Go the Rod we’re with you Bro!

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Okay now to some news and possible observations regarding the apparently likely launching. Again, with no editorial observations on my part. Just the facts as I heard and saw them.

 

- Today I asked someone who I believe is the son of the owner when they were planning on launching. He said 'very soon, maybe even unter the cover of night' (He was laughing when he said this.) and if I wanted any photos before the boat was in the water I shouldn't wait around.

 

- The fellow I spoke to also said that once the boat was in the water it would remain near the fuel dock in the harbor for 5 days before they left. I do believe they are planning to cross the bay to Richmond to fit the interior. He said they were very much in need of flooring and plumbing fixtures. I asked if he meant 'regular household type stuff, and would functional used be okay? He said yah sure bring it by.

 

- The last thing thing I've seen added on the boat are some struts under the bidge deck supporting and spreading the lower bowsprit shrouds. I will try to get some pictures.

 

- I am sorry but I haven't seen any discussion of the "sail plan" for this thing. Again from the person I spoke to: " We're planning on about 1650 sq. feet of sail area. The largest portion in the form of a 600 sq.ft genny". He seemed to think this total was a lot and I said that it didn't seem like that much for a vessel of this size. "Oh no he said. We're thinking we might make 20-25 knots with what we will have. I observed some features of the rig and said that it looked like they were planning on flying a pretty big lateen sail between the masts. He confirmed it and jestured toward a late middle aged women there (maybe the mom) and said that she was the sailmaker, and had yet to start the lateen. He said they are all going to be dacron, probably from recycled material. He might have been pulling my leg but he seemed serious, and this would suggest to me that they're thinking its going to be a while before they think they will be taking any long voyages.

 

- At this time the boat is blocked up on a vey long makeshift three axel trailer that appears made from a salvaged portable building or mobile home steel substructure. I am sure there is material for a joke here that I will leave up to the commedians. Interestingly the tongue end of this "trailer" is positioned at the aft end of the boat. So it would appear that they are planning to launce bow in first.

 

I will try to be on the scene when this thing goes in the water, and I will try and get some other photos up as I am able, If I do see something going on as I head to and from work I will at least try and get a heads up posted.

 

You da man! Thanks for an update with a bit of substance.

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Okay now to some news and possible observations regarding the apparently likely launching. Again, with no editorial observations on my part. Just the facts as I heard and saw them.

 

- Today I asked someone who I believe is the son of the owner when they were planning on launching. He said 'very soon, maybe even unter the cover of night' (He was laughing when he said this.) and if I wanted any photos before the boat was in the water I shouldn't wait around.

 

- The fellow I spoke to also said that once the boat was in the water it would remain near the fuel dock in the harbor for 5 days before they left. I do believe they are planning to cross the bay to Richmond to fit the interior. He said they were very much in need of flooring and plumbing fixtures. I asked if he meant 'regular household type stuff, and would functional used be okay? He said yah sure bring it by.

 

- The last thing thing I've seen added on the boat are some struts under the bidge deck supporting and spreading the lower bowsprit shrouds. I will try to get some pictures.

 

- I am sorry but I haven't seen any discussion of the "sail plan" for this thing. Again from the person I spoke to: " We're planning on about 1650 sq. feet of sail area. The largest portion in the form of a 600 sq.ft genny". He seemed to think this total was a lot and I said that it didn't seem like that much for a vessel of this size. "Oh no he said. We're thinking we might make 20-25 knots with what we will have. I observed some features of the rig and said that it looked like they were planning on flying a pretty big lateen sail between the masts. He confirmed it and jestured toward a late middle aged women there (maybe the mom) and said that she was the sailmaker, and had yet to start the lateen. He said they are all going to be dacron, probably from recycled material. He might have been pulling my leg but he seemed serious, and this would suggest to me that they're thinking its going to be a while before they think they will be taking any long voyages.

 

- At this time the boat is blocked up on a vey long makeshift three axel trailer that appears made from a salvaged portable building or mobile home steel substructure. I am sure there is material for a joke here that I will leave up to the commedians. Interestingly the tongue end of this "trailer" is positioned at the aft end of the boat. So it would appear that they are planning to launce bow in first.

 

I will try to be on the scene when this thing goes in the water, and I will try and get some other photos up as I am able, If I do see something going on as I head to and from work I will at least try and get a heads up posted.

 

You da man! Thanks for an update with a bit of substance.

+1 Great work!

 

Go the HotRod!!!

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someone (Clean) should contact SPOT TRACKER to get Hot Rod a sponsorship

 

would be kool to have 5 Spot Trackers when he SPLASHES

 

1 on each corner and one in the middle

 

we can place bets on what piece shall travel further / faster OR remain closest to the ramp Etc.

 

Hell I got $5 that says 1 corner shall not move from where it now sits, when the other parts leave :o

 

 

spot2o.png

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Wow, what a train wreck. But most people who get the bug fare no better. I have finished a buch of smaller boats the "largest" being a 24 ft tri. A couple being nice self designed boats. Chump change.

 

Completion rates on multihulls don't even come close to ten percent. Newick told me that the percentage of people who never even started the plans they bought was about 90%. The haircut on failures to launch is probably about the same. Newick's Pat's had cheery launch date predictions for years, and who better than him?

 

There are many things that lead to failure of the wider dream. Builds take so long for many people that they aren't the same person by the completion date. And few people have a rational plan to start with. About the only thing this guy has right is the stick-to-it-ness. That is rare enough, but it leaves him a laughing stock, when few people are any more successful, they just fail for different but equally self-deluding reasons. And most people never start at all, for better or worse.

There was a guy a while back who started a Farrier cat, claimed he had enough helpers and funds to fast track the build, insisted he would be in the water in something like 3 months.. He just didn't understand why all the neighsayers. (Things like you can't lay up and cure that much glass in that short of time, no matter how many man hours you can afford...)

Also note that he was never heard from again...

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20-25 knots? Can something sink that fast?

 

"According to National Geographic the speed of the Titanic at the time of impact with the ocean floor was nearly 35 mph. It took approximately 24 minutes for the vessel to strike bottom. The rate of descent has been estimated at 500' per minute. The ocean depth is nearly 13,000 ft where the hull rests in two pieces."
So, yes.

 

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Wow, what a train wreck. But most people who get the bug fare no better. I have finished a buch of smaller boats the "largest" being a 24 ft tri. A couple being nice self designed boats. Chump change.

 

Completion rates on multihulls don't even come close to ten percent. Newick told me that the percentage of people who never even started the plans they bought was about 90%. The haircut on failures to launch is probably about the same. Newick's Pat's had cheery launch date predictions for years, and who better than him?

 

There are many things that lead to failure of the wider dream. Builds take so long for many people that they aren't the same person by the completion date. And few people have a rational plan to start with. About the only thing this guy has right is the stick-to-it-ness. That is rare enough, but it leaves him a laughing stock, when few people are any more successful, they just fail for different but equally self-deluding reasons. And most people never start at all, for better or worse.

There was a guy a while back who started a Farrier cat, claimed he had enough helpers and funds to fast track the build, insisted he would be in the water in something like 3 months.. He just didn't understand why all the neighsayers. (Things like you can't lay up and cure that much glass in that short of time, no matter how many man hours you can afford...)

Also note that he was never heard from again...

 

In Project/Program management I call this the "envelope locking problem."

 

In other words, if your task is to lick and seal 100 envelopes, you can make it happen faster by increasing the size of the team. One person can lick and seal N envelopes and hour. Two people can theoretically do it in half the time. Managers love this. It's called "throwing more monkeys at the problem." They think it solves everything. It doesn't.

 

Some tasks are discrete. Only one person can work on it at a time.

 

You can't lick and seal one envelope if you throw more people at it.

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20-25 knots? Can something sink that fast?

 

"According to National Geographic the speed of the Titanic at the time of impact with the ocean floor was nearly 35 mph. It took approximately 24 minutes for the vessel to strike bottom. The rate of descent has been estimated at 500' per minute. The ocean depth is nearly 13,000 ft where the hull rests in two pieces."
So, yes.

 

Using statute miles (5,280 feet per mile) and 13,000 foot descent in 24 minutes I get:

 

60/24 = 2.5

2.5 * 13,000 = 32,500 feet per hour descent rate

32,500/5,280 = 6.1553 miles per hour as an average speed for the total journey to the sea floor

 

So, if the impact with the abyssal plain was 35 mph that's an impressive acceleration curve. Now I'm pondering terminal velocity for an object like the Titanic during free-fall through ocean water...Somebody check my arithmatic.

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20-25 knots? Can something sink that fast?

"According to National Geographic the speed of the Titanic at the time of impact with the ocean floor was nearly 35 mph. It took approximately 24 minutes for the vessel to strike bottom. The rate of descent has been estimated at 500' per minute. The ocean depth is nearly 13,000 ft where the hull rests in two pieces."

 

So, yes.

Using statute miles (5,280 feet per mile) and 13,000 foot descent in 24 minutes I get:

 

60/24 = 2.5

2.5 * 13,000 = 32,500 feet per hour descent rate

32,500/5,280 = 6.1553 miles per hour as an average speed for the total journey to the sea floor

 

So, if the impact with the abyssal plain was 35 mph that's an impressive acceleration curve. Now I'm pondering terminal velocity for an object like the Titanic during free-fall through ocean water...Somebody check my arithmatic.

The Stokes velocity for something as big as the Titanic is very high. The terminal velocity to the seafloor for a ballbearing is low, for the Titanic, huge. I suspect it didn't hit terminal velocity.

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Wow, what a train wreck. But most people who get the bug fare no better. I have finished a buch of smaller boats the "largest" being a 24 ft tri. A couple being nice self designed boats. Chump change.

 

Completion rates on multihulls don't even come close to ten percent. Newick told me that the percentage of people who never even started the plans they bought was about 90%. The haircut on failures to launch is probably about the same. Newick's Pat's had cheery launch date predictions for years, and who better than him?

 

There are many things that lead to failure of the wider dream. Builds take so long for many people that they aren't the same person by the completion date. And few people have a rational plan to start with. About the only thing this guy has right is the stick-to-it-ness. That is rare enough, but it leaves him a laughing stock, when few people are any more successful, they just fail for different but equally self-deluding reasons. And most people never start at all, for better or worse.

There was a guy a while back who started a Farrier cat, claimed he had enough helpers and funds to fast track the build, insisted he would be in the water in something like 3 months.. He just didn't understand why all the neighsayers. (Things like you can't lay up and cure that much glass in that short of time, no matter how many man hours you can afford...)

Also note that he was never heard from again...

 

In Project/Program management I call this the "envelope locking problem."

 

In other words, if your task is to lick and seal 100 envelopes, you can make it happen faster by increasing the size of the team. One person can lick and seal N envelopes and hour. Two people can theoretically do it in half the time. Managers love this. It's called "throwing more monkeys at the problem." They think it solves everything. It doesn't.

 

Sooo... 9 women can't have a baby in a month?

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I will give him points for choosing sailing over power boats, wanting to sail into the sunset, building a boat. But spending life savings on a flawed project that will put himself and family at risk is not good,

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Sooo... 9 women can't have a baby in a month?

But they can average 1 baby a month over a 9 months if they miss their period.

 

fixed

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Using statute miles (5,280 feet per mile) and 13,000 foot descent in 24 minutes I get:

 

60/24 = 2.5

2.5 * 13,000 = 32,500 feet per hour descent rate

32,500/5,280 = 6.1553 miles per hour as an average speed for the total journey to the sea floor

 

So, if the impact with the abyssal plain was 35 mph that's an impressive acceleration curve. Now I'm pondering terminal velocity for an object like the Titanic during free-fall through ocean water...Somebody check my arithmatic.

 

For the Titanic, using the terminal velocity through the water assuming buoyancy, is ...

 

v = [ (4*g*d*((p-q)/p)) / (3*C) ]^0.5

 

where v is the terminal velocity, g gravitational accel, d is the spherical (aerodynamic diameter), p is the density of the boat, q is the density of the fluid, C is the drag coefficient.

 

The dimensions of the boat were roughly triangular cross section, of height 53 m, beam 28 m, length 269 m. Using 1/2 b*h*l, that volume is about 200,000 m^3. If the boat were reformed into the shape of a sphere, the radius would be found by setting that volume to 4/3 pi*r^3. So doing that, r = 36 m for the equivalent sphere, diameter = 72 m.

 

The displacement was about 47,455,000 kg. So the density of the dry boat was about 237 kg/m^3. The density of steel is about 7,500 kg/m^3. So, if the boat were solid steel with no air, the volume would have been 47,455,000/7,500 = 6,330 m^3. Using these two densities show that the Titanic was about 3% steel and 97% air. Therefore, once the water filled the ship, with density about q = 1,000 kg/m^3, the density of the water-filled ship was about,

 

p = (0.97 * 1,000) + (0.03 * 7,500) = 1,195 kg/m^3.

 

Using g = 9.8 m/s^2, and C about 0.7, which suggests the keel falling first, and then turbulence up near the stack, plugging everything in, that gives v about 16 meters per second, which is about 35 miles per hour.

 

Woah, I guess it did reach its terminal velocity asymptote then. I love it when the theory seems to match the measurement!

 

Now, lessee what the terminal sinking velocity of HotRod's condo cat would be ... given the published size and my estimate of bridge deck and hulls that's a volume of about 30,000 cubic feet, or about 880 m^3. At a displacement of say 10,000 kg fitted, that gives a dry density of 0.333 11.36 kg/m^3, obviously most of that is air. At 10,000 kg, with the average density of plywood and wood of about 600 kg/m^3, that means if it were a solid chunk of wood it would have a volume of about 16.6 m^3. So about 2% of that boat is wood and about 98% is air. (Interesting how expensive these boats are that are mostly air.) So if heaven forbid the boat filled completely with water, the average density would then be about (0.98*1,000) + (0.02*600) = 992 kg/m^3. Thus the density is just ever so slightly less than water and it would sink to about a few inches of the top of its bridge deck and then it would probably float.

 

This adds the opportunity for a design feature! HotRod can add a gimbaled yoga platform like Reid's boat had but put it right on the top of the bridge deck. Then if the plywood hull pops open from the torsion of the bridge deck struts, everyone can relax on the yoga deck which would stay a few inches above the water, and play pinochle until help eventually arrives. He could build a circular staircase with a little hatch up to the yoga deck.

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Well played mike. Trouble is I think the harbour where he is splashing is only about 4 foot deep. Still those coach bolts weigh a bit.

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Add the ramming plates, and the steel channel midships, and the weight of the rig, and the mother in laws wheelchair and the solar frames, and a bazillion screws and rechargeable drill batteries, and radar etc, it would probably have the decks mostly awash, so the waves can break it up fast. Sweeeeet. Painting the cabin roof dayglo orange should be mandatory.

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Just wait till he installs several flatscreen tvs & vcrs, microwave, domestic airconditioning unit, fully stuffed freezer, several couches, beds, closets, batteries, a generator to power it all, dozens of jerrycans to fuel the generator, etc etc etc

 

grant you, the wood might stay afloat, but the rest of it will most certainly head straight for the bottom...

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Sooo... 9 women can't have a baby in a month?

But they can average 1 baby a month over a 9 month period.

If a hen and a half lays an egg and a half in a day and a half, how long does it take a hundred hens to lay a hundred eggs?

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Using statute miles (5,280 feet per mile) and 13,000 foot descent in 24 minutes I get:

 

60/24 = 2.5

2.5 * 13,000 = 32,500 feet per hour descent rate

32,500/5,280 = 6.1553 miles per hour as an average speed for the total journey to the sea floor

 

So, if the impact with the abyssal plain was 35 mph that's an impressive acceleration curve. Now I'm pondering terminal velocity for an object like the Titanic during free-fall through ocean water...Somebody check my arithmatic.

 

For the Titanic, using the terminal velocity through the water assuming buoyancy, is ...

 

v = [ (4*g*d*((p-q)/p)) / (3*C) ]^0.5

 

where v is the terminal velocity, g gravitational accel, d is the spherical (aerodynamic diameter), p is the density of the boat, q is the density of the fluid, C is the drag coefficient.

 

The dimensions of the boat were roughly triangular cross section, of height 53 m, beam 28 m, length 269 m. Using 1/2 b*h*l, that volume is about 200,000 m^3. If the boat were reformed into the shape of a sphere, the radius would be found by setting that volume to 4/3 pi*r^3. So doing that, r = 36 m for the equivalent sphere, diameter = 72 m.

 

The displacement was about 47,455,000 kg. So the density of the dry boat was about 237 kg/m^3. The density of steel is about 7,500 kg/m^3. So, if the boat were solid steel with no air, the volume would have been 47,455,000/7,500 = 6,330 m^3. Using these two densities show that the Titanic was about 3% steel and 97% air. Therefore, once the water filled the ship, with density about q = 1,000 kg/m^3, the density of the water-filled ship was about,

 

p = (0.97 * 1,000) + (0.03 * 7,500) = 1,195 kg/m^3.

 

Using g = 9.8 m/s^2, and C about 0.7, which suggests the keel falling first, and then turbulence up near the stack, plugging everything in, that gives v about 16 meters per second, which is about 35 miles per hour.

 

Woah, I guess it did reach its terminal velocity asymptote then. I love it when the theory seems to match the measurement!

 

Now, lessee what the terminal sinking velocity of HotRod's condo cat would be ... given the published size and my estimate of bridge deck and hulls that's a volume of about 30,000 cubic feet, or about 880 m^3. At a displacement of say 10,000 kg fitted, that gives a dry density of 0.333 11.36 kg/m^3, obviously most of that is air. At 10,000 kg, with the average density of plywood and wood of about 600 kg/m^3, that means if it were a solid chunk of wood it would have a volume of about 16.6 m^3. So about 2% of that boat is wood and about 98% is air. (Interesting how expensive these boats are that are mostly air.) So if heaven forbid the boat filled completely with water, the average density would then be about (0.98*1,000) + (0.02*600) = 992 kg/m^3. Thus the density is just ever so slightly less than water and it would sink to about a few inches of the top of its bridge deck and then it would probably float.

 

This adds the opportunity for a design feature! HotRod can add a gimbaled yoga platform like Reid's boat had but put it right on the top of the bridge deck. Then if the plywood hull pops open from the torsion of the bridge deck struts, everyone can relax on the yoga deck which would stay a few inches above the water, and play pinochle until help eventually arrives. He could build a circular staircase with a little hatch up to the yoga deck.

 

Aren't you a PhD student? Does your advisor know about all this time not spent on your dissertation!? :)

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Using statute miles (5,280 feet per mile) and 13,000 foot descent in 24 minutes I get:

 

60/24 = 2.5

2.5 * 13,000 = 32,500 feet per hour descent rate

32,500/5,280 = 6.1553 miles per hour as an average speed for the total journey to the sea floor

 

So, if the impact with the abyssal plain was 35 mph that's an impressive acceleration curve. Now I'm pondering terminal velocity for an object like the Titanic during free-fall through ocean water...Somebody check my arithmatic.

 

For the Titanic, using the terminal velocity through the water assuming buoyancy, is ...

 

v = [ (4*g*d*((p-q)/p)) / (3*C) ]^0.5

 

where v is the terminal velocity, g gravitational accel, d is the spherical (aerodynamic diameter), p is the density of the boat, q is the density of the fluid, C is the drag coefficient.

 

The dimensions of the boat were roughly triangular cross section, of height 53 m, beam 28 m, length 269 m. Using 1/2 b*h*l, that volume is about 200,000 m^3. If the boat were reformed into the shape of a sphere, the radius would be found by setting that volume to 4/3 pi*r^3. So doing that, r = 36 m for the equivalent sphere, diameter = 72 m.

 

The displacement was about 47,455,000 kg. So the density of the dry boat was about 237 kg/m^3. The density of steel is about 7,500 kg/m^3. So, if the boat were solid steel with no air, the volume would have been 47,455,000/7,500 = 6,330 m^3. Using these two densities show that the Titanic was about 3% steel and 97% air. Therefore, once the water filled the ship, with density about q = 1,000 kg/m^3, the density of the water-filled ship was about,

 

p = (0.97 * 1,000) + (0.03 * 7,500) = 1,195 kg/m^3.

 

Using g = 9.8 m/s^2, and C about 0.7, which suggests the keel falling first, and then turbulence up near the stack, plugging everything in, that gives v about 16 meters per second, which is about 35 miles per hour.

 

Woah, I guess it did reach its terminal velocity asymptote then. I love it when the theory seems to match the measurement!

 

Now, lessee what the terminal sinking velocity of HotRod's condo cat would be ... given the published size and my estimate of bridge deck and hulls that's a volume of about 30,000 cubic feet, or about 880 m^3. At a displacement of say 10,000 kg fitted, that gives a dry density of 0.333 11.36 kg/m^3, obviously most of that is air. At 10,000 kg, with the average density of plywood and wood of about 600 kg/m^3, that means if it were a solid chunk of wood it would have a volume of about 16.6 m^3. So about 2% of that boat is wood and about 98% is air. (Interesting how expensive these boats are that are mostly air.) So if heaven forbid the boat filled completely with water, the average density would then be about (0.98*1,000) + (0.02*600) = 992 kg/m^3. Thus the density is just ever so slightly less than water and it would sink to about a few inches of the top of its bridge deck and then it would probably float.

 

This adds the opportunity for a design feature! HotRod can add a gimbaled yoga platform like Reid's boat had but put it right on the top of the bridge deck. Then if the plywood hull pops open from the torsion of the bridge deck struts, everyone can relax on the yoga deck which would stay a few inches above the water, and play pinochle until help eventually arrives. He could build a circular staircase with a little hatch up to the yoga deck.

 

 

That was a fun read. And Yoga on the Lido deck at tea-time, too!

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Any chance he filled the hull with spray foam insulation for warmth in cooler waters as well as buoyancy? I know a few people who used it in their house and it saved them a ton in heating costs.

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Using statute miles (5,280 feet per mile) and 13,000 foot descent in 24 minutes I get:

 

60/24 = 2.5

2.5 * 13,000 = 32,500 feet per hour descent rate

32,500/5,280 = 6.1553 miles per hour as an average speed for the total journey to the sea floor

 

So, if the impact with the abyssal plain was 35 mph that's an impressive acceleration curve. Now I'm pondering terminal velocity for an object like the Titanic during free-fall through ocean water...Somebody check my arithmatic.

 

For the Titanic, using the terminal velocity through the water assuming buoyancy, is ...

 

v = [ (4*g*d*((p-q)/p)) / (3*C) ]^0.5

 

where v is the terminal velocity, g gravitational accel, d is the spherical (aerodynamic diameter), p is the density of the boat, q is the density of the fluid, C is the drag coefficient.

 

The dimensions of the boat were roughly triangular cross section, of height 53 m, beam 28 m, length 269 m. Using 1/2 b*h*l, that volume is about 200,000 m^3. If the boat were reformed into the shape of a sphere, the radius would be found by setting that volume to 4/3 pi*r^3. So doing that, r = 36 m for the equivalent sphere, diameter = 72 m.

 

The displacement was about 47,455,000 kg. So the density of the dry boat was about 237 kg/m^3. The density of steel is about 7,500 kg/m^3. So, if the boat were solid steel with no air, the volume would have been 47,455,000/7,500 = 6,330 m^3. Using these two densities show that the Titanic was about 3% steel and 97% air. Therefore, once the water filled the ship, with density about q = 1,000 kg/m^3, the density of the water-filled ship was about,

 

p = (0.97 * 1,000) + (0.03 * 7,500) = 1,195 kg/m^3.

 

Using g = 9.8 m/s^2, and C about 0.7, which suggests the keel falling first, and then turbulence up near the stack, plugging everything in, that gives v about 16 meters per second, which is about 35 miles per hour.

 

Woah, I guess it did reach its terminal velocity asymptote then. I love it when the theory seems to match the measurement!

 

Now, lessee what the terminal sinking velocity of HotRod's condo cat would be ... given the published size and my estimate of bridge deck and hulls that's a volume of about 30,000 cubic feet, or about 880 m^3. At a displacement of say 10,000 kg fitted, that gives a dry density of 0.333 11.36 kg/m^3, obviously most of that is air. At 10,000 kg, with the average density of plywood and wood of about 600 kg/m^3, that means if it were a solid chunk of wood it would have a volume of about 16.6 m^3. So about 2% of that boat is wood and about 98% is air. (Interesting how expensive these boats are that are mostly air.) So if heaven forbid the boat filled completely with water, the average density would then be about (0.98*1,000) + (0.02*600) = 992 kg/m^3. Thus the density is just ever so slightly less than water and it would sink to about a few inches of the top of its bridge deck and then it would probably float.

 

This adds the opportunity for a design feature! HotRod can add a gimbaled yoga platform like Reid's boat had but put it right on the top of the bridge deck. Then if the plywood hull pops open from the torsion of the bridge deck struts, everyone can relax on the yoga deck which would stay a few inches above the water, and play pinochle until help eventually arrives. He could build a circular staircase with a little hatch up to the yoga deck.

WOW

 

are all of your 17,246 posts this involved?

 

impressive (or BS, would read pretty much the same to me)

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In Project/Program management I call this the "envelope locking problem."

 

In other words, if your task is to lick and seal 100 envelopes, you can make it happen faster by increasing the size of the team. One person can lick and seal N envelopes and hour. Two people can theoretically do it in half the time. Managers love this. It's called "throwing more monkeys at the problem." They think it solves everything. It doesn't.

 

Some tasks are discrete. Only one person can work on it at a time.

 

You can't lick and seal one envelope if you throw more people at it.

 

But if she's cute and you meet in the middle you can have more fun.

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Sooo... 9 women can't have a baby in a month?

But they can average 1 baby a month over a 9 month period.

If a hen and a half lays an egg and a half in a day and a half, how long does it take a hundred hens to lay a hundred eggs?

 

I don't fucking care. I'll be over here doing something interesting. :)

 

 

 

 

In Project/Program management I call this the "envelope locking problem."

 

In other words, if your task is to lick and seal 100 envelopes, you can make it happen faster by increasing the size of the team. One person can lick and seal N envelopes and hour. Two people can theoretically do it in half the time. Managers love this. It's called "throwing more monkeys at the problem." They think it solves everything. It doesn't.

 

Some tasks are discrete. Only one person can work on it at a time.

 

You can't lick and seal one envelope if you throw more people at it.

 

But if she's cute and you meet in the middle you can have more fun.

 

True but, that isn't a solution to a *business problem*.

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From the recent updates on building materials and techniques, I'm starting to suspect it was designed by the same outfit who spec'd the new Bay Bridge.

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Any chance he filled the hull with spray foam insulation for warmth in cooler waters as well as buoyancy? I know a few people who used it in their house and it saved them a ton in heating costs.

 

He's no dummy

 

heard a Semi pulled up long ago w enough insulation to keep the whole thing warm or kool

 

 

ghl_insulation_good_4_600x451.jpg

 

157_1wv_misc1644.jpg

 

ainsulatticblow1webdsmall.jpg

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