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65- by 32-foot catamaran 3200sqft of living space


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did anyone get to google earth to see if it moved. Long shot I know but ??

 

Maybe you should complain to Google Earth about how often they update their imagery. derp.png

 

I think it's every few years or so...

I thought we had them on the payroll??

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I can assure you, nothing was added to The Rod's replies.   Perhaps sharing my reverence for The Rod, as well as my deep appreciation for the journalistic accomplishments of my Sailing Anarchy predece

And wtf happened to lil'murray.......?

Guy did not grow a vagin! Mr. Hot is full of merde! The only place Mr. Hot has seen a double hurricane is in La Nouvelle Orléans. 

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It's Poll Time!

 

So now that Hotrod has managed to get the Fryin' Hawaiian in the water, much to the shock of transport drivers and naval architects alike, where will it go next?

 

1. Nowhere, this is it's final resting spot. (0 miles)

2. Point San Pedro Harbor - Known for its friendly, toothless residents. (3-4 miles)

3. Richardson Bay - Known for it friendly, toothless resident, but with a stunning view of the SF skyline. (10 miles)

4. The Delta. - Known for its not so friendly, toothless residents currently avoiding state/federal prosicusion. (25-60 miles)

5. Hawaii - Nothing is stopping this juggernaut bitch! (2200 miles)

 

 

I don't know very much about the SF area, but I would say there is no way he is clearing SFBay with it the way it is now. Guess

I will go with #2 based upon the description.

 

I suspect he will find during his 'sea trials" that it is indeed impossible to handle as a sailing craft and barely manageable

as a powered barge. He will probably redesign the helm stations and inadequate rudders after that so that he can at

least motor it around with some control. He will probably never even attempt to sail it again after that and his sights will be

lowered to life afloat somewhere close to where he is now. The question then will become; can he find a place to stay for

free or nearly so? Once he attaches motors to it he needs to get it registered somehow ( at least in my state you do). Not

sure how he plans to get around that, but trying to keep an un-registered, home-built powerboat on the water as a full time

liveaboard is a certain way to attract unwanted attention from Law enforcement.

 

I would be interested in seeing what has become of the launch apparatus and tow vehicle if our intrepid correspondent can

get some shots.

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Well fuck me, time to look for a new job. It would take me two weeks playing with excel and maxsurf to get a 65' cat to float that close to its lines on launch day.

 

 

Quick Formula Needed Tools:

 

Depth Chart, Tide Book, Clock & Kamera

 

Like a Broken Watch

 

the Float lines shall be pretty close (if painted at tide average level) every 8 hours or so

 

if launched at High Tide could (Good Odd's) it be setting on the mud at Low Tide ??

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It's Poll Time!

 

So now that Hotrod has managed to get the Fryin' Hawaiian in the water, much to the shock of transport drivers and naval architects alike, where will it go next?

 

1. Nowhere, this is it's final resting spot. (0 miles)

2. Point San Pedro Harbor - Known for its friendly, toothless residents. (3-4 miles)

3. Richardson Bay - Known for it friendly, toothless resident, but with a stunning view of the SF skyline. (10 miles)

4. The Delta. - Known for its not so friendly, toothless residents currently avoiding state/federal prosicusion. (25-60 miles)

5. Hawaii - Nothing is stopping this juggernaut bitch! (2200 miles)

 

 

I don't know very much about the SF area, but I would say there is no way he is clearing SFBay with it the way it is now. Guess

I will go with #2 based upon the description.

 

I suspect he will find during his 'sea trials" that it is indeed impossible to handle as a sailing craft and barely manageable

as a powered barge. He will probably redesign the helm stations and inadequate rudders after that so that he can at

least motor it around with some control. He will probably never even attempt to sail it again after that and his sights will be

lowered to life afloat somewhere close to where he is now. The question then will become; can he find a place to stay for

free or nearly so? Once he attaches motors to it he needs to get it registered somehow ( at least in my state you do). Not

sure how he plans to get around that, but trying to keep an un-registered, home-built powerboat on the water as a full time

liveaboard is a certain way to attract unwanted attention from Law enforcement.

 

I would be interested in seeing what has become of the launch apparatus and tow vehicle if our intrepid correspondent can

get some shots.

It would be interesting to see the look on his face when the sails first get hoisted and the hulk is still immobile.

 

lilmurray, when he launched it did they put it in the water bow first or stern first? Just a bit curious to know how far it had to go into the water before in actually started to float.

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Kudos to the Rods determination. He even got the rudderblades down. Now to stop the water gushing in through the 4 rudder control wire holes, take the new sag out of the bridgedeck and work out how he is going to fit outboards on something that when empty already has the transom at or near the water. Now to move it to the nearest swamp..

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Give the guy a little credit. No one thought he'd get it into the water undamaged, much less that he'd be just about right on the money as far as the waterline. No one here thought he'd even get to this point. 99% of your criticisms are surely apt, but this Memorial Day let's just give it a rest and applaud his perspicacity this far.

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Hey, I just noticed the distinct lack of daggerboards. Gonna be pretty tough to put those on while it's in the water, don't you think?

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very glad to see her floating at last, now where she should be, in the water. Well done Hotrod for getting her there. Not at all what I like in the way of boats, but for a house boat, she is not too bad.

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Well I admit I was wrong to. So far. Lilmurray any chance you can get on board for some more internal pics? I am sure many things will have 'moved' during the 'move'.

Next stop Hawaii. Void Ho!

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Guys, he hasn't even cut out the 1/4" plexi Windows yet. Clearly under pressure, he launched ASAP and put off deta,ils like the leaks in the stern, a means of propulsion and seeing where you're going for another paycheck.

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haters-gonna-hate.gif

 

Rod's doing just fine with his plan so far, it would seem...

 

'So Far'? The only thing that is 'just fine' about this is that being in a shallow marina, it can only sink 'So far'.

 

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The thing is, he is using standard construction plywood for everything, including the underbody.

 

I don't recall anyone mentioning if he glass/epoxied over it. I seems doubtful that he did.

 

But once water ingresses that plywood, it is gonna wick throughout the rest of the structure like you would not believe..

 

Its gonna add weight in the short term, and rot/delam in the medium/longer term.

 

Even a thin coat of epoxy will not protect against this, once the thing starts flexing (thus cracking any coating).

 

Lets assume it is worth 6 million dollars like he believes, now that it is in the water, that value is rapidly approaching zero.

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Like the guy who jumped out of a tall building said, "so far, so good"

 

I can't give HR much credit for getting it in the water, he's just lucky no one got killed.

 

Now the real fun begins. The ocean has been waiting to get this thing. Maybe he should think of a new name. Since it's a sailing vessel how about "Lee King"?

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The thing is, he is using standard construction plywood for everything, including the underbody.

 

I don't recall anyone mentioning if he glass/epoxied over it. I seems doubtful that he did.

 

But once water ingresses that plywood, it is gonna wick throughout the rest of the structure like you would not believe..

 

Its gonna add weight in the short term, and rot/delam in the medium/longer term.

 

Even a thin coat of epoxy will not protect against this, once the thing starts flexing (thus cracking any coating).

 

Lets assume it is worth 6 million dollars like he believes, now that it is in the water, that value is rapidly approaching zero.

from the story posted on the first page...

"The yacht, which Lane will call the Flying Hawaiian, features fiberglass over wood construction and boasts two kitchens and a gym. It weighs about five tons and has so far required 700 to 800 pounds of screws, Lane said. Sixty-five-foot catamarans typically sell for anywhere from $500,000 to $2 million or more."

 

Then again, he's evidently said any number of things which seem,,,, unlikely. Who knows, right?

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The thing is, he is using standard construction plywood for everything, including the underbody.

 

I don't recall anyone mentioning if he glass/epoxied over it. I seems doubtful that he did.

 

But once water ingresses that plywood, it is gonna wick throughout the rest of the structure like you would not believe..

 

Its gonna add weight in the short term, and rot/delam in the medium/longer term.

 

Even a thin coat of epoxy will not protect against this, once the thing starts flexing (thus cracking any coating).

 

Lets assume it is worth 6 million dollars like he believes, now that it is in the water, that value is rapidly approaching zero.

 

He has a single layer of what looks like 6oz fiberglass over the entire hull with a shitload of epoxy. There is some extra glass in the bridgedeck/hull joints. As I recall there is no glass on the inside of the hulls, just epoxy over the wood.

 

Won't take long for the water to find a pinhole or two and start the long, slow water-logging process.

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The thing is, he is using standard construction plywood for everything, including the underbody.

 

I don't recall anyone mentioning if he glass/epoxied over it. I seems doubtful that he did.

 

But once water ingresses that plywood, it is gonna wick throughout the rest of the structure like you would not believe..

 

Its gonna add weight in the short term, and rot/delam in the medium/longer term.

 

Even a thin coat of epoxy will not protect against this, once the thing starts flexing (thus cracking any coating).

 

Lets assume it is worth 6 million dollars like he believes, now that it is in the water, that value is rapidly approaching zero.

from the story posted on the first page...

"The yacht, which Lane will call the Flying Hawaiian, features fiberglass over wood construction and boasts two kitchens and a gym. It weighs about five tons and has so far required 700 to 800 pounds of screws, Lane said. Sixty-five-foot catamarans typically sell for anywhere from $500,000 to $2 million or more."

 

Then again, he's evidently said any number of things which seem,,,, unlikely. Who knows, right?

 

Yeah, I bet it qualifies as "cold molded" by Gougeon standards.... not.

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Hey, I just noticed the distinct lack of daggerboards. Gonna be pretty tough to put those on while it's in the water, don't you think?

no worries there

 

imagine trying to get 'the yacht' to go upwind with that rig

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someone ask what direction the Pyramid of Pain shall head for

 

when its mooring gives out

 

I think Bob knows and can explain it best

 

so Lets ask him

 

 

 

Bob What Direction shall H-R head in ???

 

 

 

 

that's one ride that shall spend its life going DDW ;)

 

unless the Current grabs it on a Dead Calm Day :o

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The thing is, he is using standard construction plywood for everything, including the underbody.

 

I don't recall anyone mentioning if he glass/epoxied over it. I seems doubtful that he did.

 

But once water ingresses that plywood, it is gonna wick throughout the rest of the structure like you would not believe..

 

Its gonna add weight in the short term, and rot/delam in the medium/longer term.

 

Even a thin coat of epoxy will not protect against this, once the thing starts flexing (thus cracking any coating).

 

Lets assume it is worth 6 million dollars like he believes, now that it is in the water, that value is rapidly approaching zero.

 

Home Depot sells marine ply, maybe that's what he got.

 

http://www.homedepot.com/p/3-4-In-4-Ft-x-8-Ft-AB-Marine-Plywood-726540/202084532#.UaP5Xb-4Ay4

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The thing is, he is using standard construction plywood for everything, including the underbody.

 

I don't recall anyone mentioning if he glass/epoxied over it. I seems doubtful that he did.

 

But once water ingresses that plywood, it is gonna wick throughout the rest of the structure like you would not believe..

 

Its gonna add weight in the short term, and rot/delam in the medium/longer term.

 

Even a thin coat of epoxy will not protect against this, once the thing starts flexing (thus cracking any coating).

 

Lets assume it is worth 6 million dollars like he believes, now that it is in the water, that value is rapidly approaching zero.

 

Home Depot sells marine ply, maybe that's what he got.

 

http://www.homedepot.com/p/3-4-In-4-Ft-x-8-Ft-AB-Marine-Plywood-726540/202084532#.UaP5Xb-4Ay4

 

 

that's what is now

 

soon to be digested marine organism food :)

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is it me or do a few things look a little off? The aft deck looks like it has a slight sag. The roof above looks twisted. Did the front edges of the superstructure always have that bend in them? For those asking about centerboards, remember they are going to be lee boards spec'd the same as the rudders so they can do double duty. But they will be mounted on the inside of the hulls. That's going to be some bolt and washer holding those puppies on! Think hey will be able to swing them under load? Once the marine life sticks to everything. To bad the debris will float, this thing would make an epic underwater reef



Looks pretty much the same as a Gunboat.

Gunboats lawyers will be calling you soon!

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Guys, he hasn't even cut out the 1/4" plexi Windows yet. Clearly under pressure, he launched ASAP and put off deta,ils like the leaks in the stern, a means of propulsion and seeing where you're going for another paycheck.

Lacking a means of propulsion? Can't you see all the holes for the oars, and the mast? Plenty of propulsion. Mom is going to need to lock the wheels on her chair when she's rowing though.

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now if he's going to be renting places to crash for the LVC/AC ????

 

wonder if he'd give me a deal for keeping his thread alive (like I did for TOG :rolleyes: ) ???

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Congratulations Card

 

 

 

 

 

 

From DARWIN

 

 

 

 

on leaving Land behind

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

397425_584946188204693_22368345_n.jpg

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Hey, I just noticed the distinct lack of daggerboards. Gonna be pretty tough to put those on while it's in the water, don't you think?

Hobie 16 and Wave don't need no stinkin daggerboards. You don't think HR incorporated that into the design?

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Hey, I just noticed the distinct lack of daggerboards. Gonna be pretty tough to put those on while it's in the water, don't you think?

Hobie 16 and Wave don't need no stinkin daggerboards. You don't think HR incorporated that into the design?

 

Stupid me. I forgot that he is using "asymetrical" hulls like they use on offshore powerboats. At 25kts+ this thing is going to track just fine. Daggerboards bah!

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The thing is, he is using standard construction plywood for everything, including the underbody.

 

I don't recall anyone mentioning if he glass/epoxied over it. I seems doubtful that he did.

 

But once water ingresses that plywood, it is gonna wick throughout the rest of the structure like you would not believe..

 

Its gonna add weight in the short term, and rot/delam in the medium/longer term.

 

Even a thin coat of epoxy will not protect against this, once the thing starts flexing (thus cracking any coating).

 

Lets assume it is worth 6 million dollars like he believes, now that it is in the water, that value is rapidly approaching zero.

from the story posted on the first page...

"The yacht, which Lane will call the Flying Hawaiian, features fiberglass over wood construction and boasts two kitchens and a gym. It weighs about five tons and has so far required 700 to 800 pounds of screws, Lane said. Sixty-five-foot catamarans typically sell for anywhere from $500,000 to $2 million or more."

 

Then again, he's evidently said any number of things which seem,,,, unlikely. Who knows, right?

 

Another of his many talents......

 

 

Street-Rod-Lane-Red-&-Yellow-Car-Logo-Si

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This might be a bit anticlimactic given there wasn’t a catastrophe and everybody has now seen the photos of the boat in the water. Essentially, pretty much everything went as Hot Rod told me beforehand he thought it would. He appeared to have the whole process under control despite appearing pretty tired from lack of sleep and filthy from rolling around in the dirt under the trailer attaching the new axel. He and his crew went non stop for about 18 hours to get the boat in the water. There was lots of unsolicited advice offered from the 15 or so bystanders and Marina staff that was on hand but Hot Rod just seemed to go about his business. I found it interesting that he introduced himself to several of those on hand using his given name James.

 

 

 

If you pardon the expression, this is essentially how it went down.:

 

4th Axel mounted to trailer.

 

post-98603-0-88182300-1369706501_thumb.jpeg

 

Gradall attached to trailer. This is a photo taken while the move was in progress.

 

post-98603-0-77135900-1369706468_thumb.jpg post-98603-0-20596100-1369706470_thumb.jpg

 

Trailer and boat pulled off the dirt and on to the road.

 

post-98603-0-69000700-1369706471_thumb.jpg post-98603-0-09008100-1369706473_thumb.jpg post-98603-0-50163600-1369706500_thumb.jpg post-98603-0-40737900-1369706474_thumb.jpg

 

Moved about 120 yards and turned right. (Gradall still pulling the boat.)

 

post-98603-0-66438700-1369706475_thumb.jpg post-98603-0-40042500-1369706497_thumb.jpg post-98603-0-77450700-1369706498_thumb.jpg

 

Pushed and turned between fence and building. This was the tightest and most difficult spot to move through and took about an hour of repositioning back and forth

 

Last short section to follow

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he oughta use a push boat for propulsion like the skipjacks on Chesapeake Bay.

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When do the wing sails go on so H-R can show the AC folks how to sail a big cat on the Bay?

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LM, tell those Macs to keep their shitty selves out of the pics. Damn things, always trying to horn in on REAL sailboat stuff.

 

And thanks for keeping an eye on this, I bet your family is digging it as much as you. Or not.

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Here are a few final shots down the ramp and in the water. I know all these shots from the launch are vwry dark. Indeed there was very little light and Hot Rod asked that there be no headlights or flashes because it was very difficult to see signals from Mike and his friend. They used flashlights and very simple hand signals. Hot Rod was up and down from the tow vehicle constantly running around checking everything himself. The only thing that experienced some minor damage was the front of the trailer where the fork lift blades were chained. The rig really didn't want to turn and so the relatively light weight beam at the front of the trailer took some abuse in the process.

 

I have lots more photos to come including many detail shots taken before and after the launch in good light

 

 

 

post-98603-0-83701200-1369709669_thumb.jpg post-98603-0-35881700-1369708262_thumb.jpg post-98603-0-12073100-1369709671_thumb.jpg

 

post-98603-0-43286700-1369708265_thumb.jpg post-98603-0-76543200-1369708266_thumb.jpg

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Any word yet on whether or not it's taken on any water? I hope The Rod had enough foresight to install bilge pumps before launch.

 

As of this afternoon bilge was dry. We had a little rain this afternoon and I got some indication of what water does on deck. Photos to come.

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lilmurray, thank you so much for your sober, yet quite entertaining reportage.

 

I see the FH seems to have had hot house power throughout the exercise. Are those in fact, 110V fluorescent tube lighting fixtures? Any word on the power plant and amperage budget?

 

Amp-hour issues aside, I have a large number of 8-foot fluorescent fixtures in my greenhouse operations, and while they are far more economical than incandescent lighting, even in the immobile greenhouses, due to fluctuating environmental conditions, those tubes occasionally come crashing down. It ruins your whole day. (At least, if you don't like to wear shoes.) On the plus side, they do seem to tolerate high humidity fairly well.

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Hey, Lilmurray, what did it sound like as it settled in the water? Lots of creaking? Hats off to the guy for getting in the water. Kinda like a bike FU to everyone (including me) who thought this would fall apart once he tried to move it. Didn't fall apart, floats on its line. Bravo.

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Hey, Lilmurray, what did it sound like as it settled in the water? Lots of creaking? Hats off to the guy for getting in the water. Kinda like a bike FU to everyone (including me) who thought this would fall apart once he tried to move it. Didn't fall apart, floats on its line. Bravo.

 

While there was a lot of groaning and creaking as the whole rig moved along the ground, its likely most of it was comming from the trailer, the cribbing, and the connection between the Gradall and the trailer. The rig had to transit four or five speed bumps. Also the turn past the building follows a canted surface. As I mentioned before, the boat was not attached to the trailer so it did a little rocking side to side, but overall appeared very stable. The boat went into the water quite gracefully. I think I mentioned that one of the reasons they wanted to go in on a big high tide is that the upper end of the ramp has a very shallow angle. There may have been a faint creaking as the boat went in, but really nothing remarkable.

 

This said, it doesn't mean that nothing setteled on the boat. When the boat was put on the trailer with all its weight supported by the bridge deck the hulls settled down. and they rotated ever so slightly inward. This caused the floor of the bridge deck to rise some in the center. This wasn't so obvious at the front of the boat because there are posts down the center line that limited this movement by transferring the stress up to the upper deck. Even so, the upper deck below the main mast also became crowned, and was quite obvious because this reduced the space between the cross beam and the deck at the center to zero. As a remedy the hulls were raised and some temprary blocking was installed below the beam to preserve the space. In this way the very strong beam was brought to bear in limiting the movement. This temorary "remedy" can be seen here"

 

post-98603-0-74780500-1369724662_thumb.jpg

 

 

This same condition was present at the rear of the bridge deck, but was much more noticable in the cabin floor because there were no posts here to provide the kind of top down support provided forward. So Hot Rod added a temporary post that can be seen through the patio at the center of the photo door below. Several observers incorrectly identified it as a compression post for the Mizzen Mast. I commented earlier that it didn't appear to be because of the way the mast base is constructed. In fact the earlier posters were right in a sense but the comression stress it was mitigating was from the bottom up.

 

post-98603-0-33450900-1369724694_thumb.jpg

 

When the boat went in the water everything changed. as the hulls floated they rotated back to level, and by my eye a little past that into a bit of a schrug or slightly splayed position. This reversed the path of stress and now the cabin floor went back to about level or even sagged a little. When this happened the temporary post went loose and it slipped out, and I noticed a partition stud seemed to have pulled up off the floor to hang suspended. Also, the bow in the forward cabin disappeared and the spacers uner the mast support beam are now completely loose. I verified both of these conditions today. Finally, I noticed in one of today's posts that someone viewing a photo of the boat in the water suggested that the Mizzen shrouds had gone slack. I did not verify this today, but It certainly would be consistent with the other things I saw.

 

post-98603-0-84636800-1369727961_thumb.jpg post-98603-0-05573600-1369727963_thumb.jpeg

 

Blocking now loose No more post. See anything else here?

 

 

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looks like a big curve in the patio 'Roof'. Also you could tie a knot in one of the stays on the starboard side. And what are the two diagonal struts on the port side for?

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If you save the last picture with other software, and zoom in, you can see a really obvious concave waterline in the port side hull, inner face. You cant see the starboard matching side, but from earlier pictures the inner faces of both hulls were flat and straight. It looks like twisting forces or water pressure is deforming the inner face of the port hull by about 6 inches. Also in that last picture, if you compare the distances between the steel beam and the verandah facing, you will see that either the verandah roof is twisted so that it is lowest in its aft porter corner, or more likely, there is a twist in the boat. When you look at the verandah floor, it appears to have minimal camber to shed any rainwater, and the side decks look as though they would funnel water towards the cabin, rather than away from it. If he used a dumpy level to draw the waterline on the boat, then judging by the port stern waterline, the port hull is twisting such that the outer side is higher in the water than the inner side (probably contributing to the concave effect on the inner face. There appears no doubt that in flat calm waters, unladen, the hulls are already twisting outwards at the bottom.

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the string of lights under the verandah roof appear to be led's, judging from a previous picture, so they are probably 12 volt. No doubt you are right about the master suite having the occasional potted plant... What a perfect secure greenhouse this will make, when the windows are all added and it is parked up an inaccessible swamp. Drug dogs (even the semi toothless ones) hate swimming more than they hate swamps. Throw in the odd gator or two, and nobody will be helping themselves to those tomato plants..

lilmurray, thank you so much for your sober, yet quite entertaining reportage.

 

I see the FH seems to have had hot house power throughout the exercise. Are those in fact, 110V fluorescent tube lighting fixtures? Any word on the power plant and amperage budget?

 

Amp-hour issues aside, I have a large number of 8-foot fluorescent fixtures in my greenhouse operations, and while they are far more economical than incandescent lighting, even in the immobile greenhouses, due to fluctuating environmental conditions, those tubes occasionally come crashing down. It ruins your whole day. (At least, if you don't like to wear shoes.) On the plus side, they do seem to tolerate high humidity fairly well.

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I don't think it will be just one big wave. A number of smaller waves will IMHO work it to death before he gets a chance to enjoy the experience of one big one. The deck screws will chew there way loose in no time and all that flex evident in the launch will only become more and more pronounced just as it sits. Oh and that water logging comment was likely pretty accurate.

One thing I did notice was either ole Rod painted the bottom line crooked or the hulls are splaying already.

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Yep. Lilmurray should be awarded the SA pink flag! Thanks LM this is first class. Does anyone else think how much more fun this would be if Hot Rod found this thread and started flaming back?

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Wow, just wow. You have to respect HR's determination in getting this thing to this point - I never thought it would see water.

 

If only he had bought some plans!

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Unashamedly making my first post on this one.

 

 

Has anyone seen quite what happens if you flex normal weatherproof board with knots in the plies constantly? I don't think it'll take long before bits the size of the knots will start popping out of the glass on the hull or inside.

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so in launching it appears the hulls have several inches of movement creating the flex in the bridge deck. Not a good way to start off. Also it looks like the comment about the port hull becoming concave is spot on. My guess is no amount of in the water work will solve that. Adding braces inside the hull will likely crack the seams in the ply, if the flexing hasn't done that already. And pulling it out again isn't going to happen, I doubt it would survive. What was HR's thoughts on the flexing? Was he bothered by it or did he have some preconceived notion that like the AC72 boats and the DoG this is normal for this type of "yacht". Now I have never had a boat big enough to need insurance on but I assume in order to get insurance an inspection is made? By someone who knows boats, correct? So he likely doesn't have insurance, nor will he be able to get it so when this thing starts to break up it's just a total loss for him. If I owned that piece of shore where it is tied up now I would make him move it Asap!

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fuckin A, go the Hot Rod!

 

He's not aware of the pending disaster looming, and must feel pretty good about it so far. If he can get it up to the delta, he might have a chance!

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A good coating of barnacles might help keep it together longer.

surely he used galvanzied screws??

 

and, does anyone know if he did use any copper based or lead paint on any part of the ply below waterlines?

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Yep. Lilmurray should be awarded the SA pink flag! Thanks LM this is first class. Does anyone else think how much more fun this would be if Hot Rod found this thread and started flaming back?

You are a bad man. :P

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Well lilmurray has to get the 1st Place 2013 SA Achievement AWARD

 

Scot you need to SWAG him OUT

 

And lilmurray if you ever travel anywhere let us know - We All Owe You Many Drinks !!!!!

 

And I hope you'll be around whilst I'm up for the AC-72's so I can get you a Drink too

 

 

 

As for H-R

 

to counter the bucketing in as it spreads

 

he could get a couple thousand of these

 

20149_full.jpg

 

I can't find it in me to say Congratulations to H-R for splashing it

 

I'm amazed that he did & that it's looking sortoflikeaboat from way back

 

Were Splashing it a Destination he'd have made it

 

However it's but a first tiny step of a LONG Ordeal just to hold it together even on a Pond of Glass

 

 

How long does anyone think it would hold - Sitting in the same area

 

with PWC's Ripping around creating the Odd Wakes from every angle

 

rather than Insurance H-R should look into a LLC to own the Mega Yacht = ASAP !!!!

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I know what the ultimate outcome will be on this but I find myself hoping old HR will make it. It reminds me of that scene in the Deer Hunter. I hope he makes it to Hawaii. Or, at least I hope he and whoever goes with him does not die....

 

 

http://vimeo.com/55781199

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structural conditions???????

 

Sorry for the momentary lapse from nautical vocabulary. I have a report coming with photos on the Flyin's scantlings.

Awesome reporting, look out Clean!!! :D

 

Go The HotRod!!!

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I know what the ultimate outcome will be on this but I find myself hoping old HR will make it. It reminds me of that scene in the Deer Hunter. I hope he makes it to Hawaii. Or, at least I hope he and whoever goes with him does not die....

 

 

I was outside the gate last Friday. no fucking way is that thing making it to Hawaii. the Delta however, is within his grasp.

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structural conditions???????

 

Sorry for the momentary lapse from nautical vocabulary. I have a report coming with photos on the Flyin's scantlings.

no worries. Actually I thought it was really funny. I mean we all know it has issues but that wording was perfect. Can't wait for the report. Great stuff and thanks for being our "at the scene" guy.

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With the pedestals placed where they are, even if the rudders work, it will be a first class bitch to steer.

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With the pedestals placed where they are, even if the rudders work, it will be a first class bitch to steer.

The reason that it will be a bitch to steer has nothing to do with the placement of the pedestals. If you stand to the outboard side of either pedestal, you should have a view from forward to aft on that side. If you want to know whats coming from the other side, just run across to the other pedestal. He won't need the weight room, just running back and forth between the pedestals will provide ample exercise.

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