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Tension gauge


o69u812

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Should the LOOS gauge RT10 and the RT11 read compleatly different numbers? (it's a 5 reading on the RT11 and 39 on the RT10) with the same size.281 rod, am I missing something here. They both are rated for this size rod.

 

If I bring the RT11 up to the base number from the tuning guide of the sailmaer it's way too tight.

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Should the LOOS gauge RT10 and the RT11 read compleatly different numbers? (it's a 5 reading on the RT11 and 39 on the RT10) with the same size.281 rod, am I missing something here. They both are rated for this size rod.

 

If I bring the RT11 up to the base number from the tuning guide of the sailmaer it's way too tight.

 

Your tuning guide should specify which gauge to use which will eliminate this problem. The number on the LOOS gauges is dependent on the deflection of the stay pulling on the spring, the RT10 and RT11 use springs that have different properties so will give you different numbers.

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I prefer this product for checking the tension of my rig. It's not very accurate though... the tension on my mast keeps goes up the more I try to look at the readout.

 

post-17166-1249453799_thumb.jpg

That's due to friction, add some kind of lubrication and you'll be fine.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I finally found this chart on L-36 after looking all over for it. This is the comparison between the PT-1 PT-2 and PT-3 Loos gauges, correlating Loos number to lbf of tension. I was unable to locate the corresponding chart for the rod tension gauges, so call Loos if you need it. Each gauge should have included this conversion chart, so to the OP: RTFM :D

Anyway, here is the chart for the next poor bastard looking for it.

http://l-36.com/PTgague.gif

PTgague.gif

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I prefer this product for checking the tension of my rig. It's not very accurate though... the tension on my mast keeps goes up the more I try to look at the readout.

 

post-17166-1249453799_thumb.jpg

 

Now were talking...

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Sorry I didn't notice this thread earlier. The calibration gif is from this article http://l-36.com/loosaccuracy.php. The article goes over my trials trying to get accurate measurements. There were two key findings. One is that you have to wiggle the gauge around a bit after you set it on the wire. This removes the construction stretch. Without doing this, the readings are very inaccurate. The instructions say something like "make sure there is no friction". They don't mean lubricate it, they mean wiggle it around and get the friction out of the wire. Second point is that with the PT-2, which is what I have for my 1/4 inch wire, it really is only accurate up to 1300 pounds. That is the point where they calibrate them so they are really good right at that point. If you have a backstay turnbuckle, you can calibrate how many pounds tension each turn produces say between 1000 and 1300 pounds and just use that number to determine how much tension you get per turn and find your tension above 1300 that way. In other words, if it takes 6 turns on the backstay to go from 1000 to 1300 pounds, that is 50 pounds per turn. So if you want 1400 pounds, just go two turns past the 1300 pound reading.

 

I updated a ton of stuff on the weather page so be sure to check that out. It is US only but is really good, at least that is what people tell me, so I apologize to the non US sailors out there. I will make a post on it soon but just a heads up to this forum.

 

Also, if you race in SF Bay and don't look at the current chart on the site, and your competitor does, you might be in big trouble. We were 10 minutes ahead of the #2 boat and the only boat that sailed the second leg against the shore even though it was out of the strongest winds, it was out of the current. Current almost always trumps wind.

 

Allen

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