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how i fixed my f-ed up windows


mrgnstrn

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i don't have a blog, and i want to remember what the hell i did to fix my windows, so you jokers are the beneficiaries.

 

ok, the setup: mid-80's C&C have these awesome looking angular fixed ports that are only held by adhesive, no frames, no screws, just set into a recess in the cabintop.

 

so mine were installed (or replaced at some point) and affixed with this really stiff, hard "glue" that didn't flex at all. so when the plexiglass and fiberglass moved at different rates and times, something had to give.

 

in many cases it was the boat that gave. the gelcoat generally stuck harder to the plexiglass than the gelcoat stuck to the boat. so all around the window, the glass is floating, holding on to nothing but shards of gelcoat that used to be attached to the cabintop.

 

and all that stress caused cracks radiating away from the windows.

 

This is what it looked like when I started this mess:

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so job one was fixing all the cracking and crap. that's next.

 

-M

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so, now it's time to grind all those cracks out down to solid material.

 

in many places the crack went thru all the gelcoat, down to the laminate.

 

 

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this one was the most extensive.

 

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The window to the right in this pic had large swaths where the gelcoat wasn't stuck to the laminate anymore, it just flaked off. so i ground it off until I got to solid laminate or anything solid. You could see a brown twinge to the interface between the gelcoat and laminate that proved that water and dirt and shit had gotten between the two. I ground until I stopped seeing the color change at the boundary.

 

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a closer pic of the flaking part

 

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-M

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so now that I have no more cracks left, time to fill them *not* with tons more gelcoat, but with 3M premium filler.

 

I learned a lot about how to mix that shit, how to lay it into the cracks, and how to sand it.

 

I am posting 8 pictures, which accounts for probably 80% of the time and effort, and no less than 5 "rounds" of mix,fill,sand,curse, repeat.

 

there is no justice in the world.

 

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at some point, I went back and ground out the crack into the nonskid. at first, I wasn't sure how I would re-gelcoat that part, but later, i figureed out that the nonskid problem was a better problem than having the pre-existing crack screw up all my work.

 

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somewhere in here, I have cleaned up my dust and used lots of tape to mask off the inside of the boat from the future gelcoat spraying.

 

-m

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so at this point, i was ready to gelcoat this area to cover over my fixes.

 

i contacted the on-yard fiberglass company and asked them to mix up a color matched batch of gelcoat for me to spray on the sides.

 

i will not out them, nor will i say anything bad about them. instead, i will let their version of "color matched" speak for itself.

 

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now, I didn't take pictures the day i masked and aprayed.

 

these are pictures after the fact.

 

I had masked off right on the boundary between the smooth and non-skid gelcoat at the top and bottom edges of the cabin top, and then also at edges along the back of the cabin top. on the forward edge, I had hoped to feather it out to hide the blend behind the shroud.

 

needless to say, these pictures are me re-sanding this area in preparation for round 2 with better matched gelcoat.

 

that's in the next post.

-M

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ok, so to be fair to the previously mentioned on-yard fiberglass business, when I showed them how far off their match was, the did go back and make it right.

 

so, this series is after I have masked and resprayed with the newer, darker, color matched gelcoat.

 

its hard to see in this series where the feathering is, but I guess that's maybe a good indication of how well it matches.

 

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to do this job, I thinned the gelcoat with MEK, until it sprayed smoothly out of a Pre-Val spray gun setup. I could have used a HVLP sprayer, but 1)I didn't have one of those, and 2) it would have meant bringing my shop compressor to the dock, which was a pain.

 

so Preval it was.

 

it went OK.

 

the gelcoat had NO wax in it, so I had to put PVA on top of the job to get the top layer to cure.

 

I couldn't figure out how to get PVA to spray. I tried straight PVA in a preval, but it couldn't spray, and didn't even get sucked up teh tube.

I tried to put straight PVA in a water-squirt sprayer (think Windex sprayer), but it didn't spray so much as dribble.

So I mixed it 50/50 water/PVA, put it in the squirt gun, and it was better, but still dribbly. whatever, I sprayed that crap on, and spread it around evenly with a paper towel. the gelcoat had kicked enough to be hard so I didn't smear it with my paper towel.

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so up to this point, I have spent ALL my time getting the window frames prepared to take new windows.

 

I took the old windows up to my favorite plastics place (Annapolis Maritime Plastics), and they cut new ones from the old ones in 2 days. and sold me all the shit HE uses to install these very windows in boats.

 

 

In this shot, we have masked off the outside of the boat, and the inside of the boat in blue tape, and that white/grey thing inside the recess is a fancy foam double stick tape. it does 2 things: 1) it holds the window in place while the silicone sets. 2) it keeps a consistent standoff from the frame so that there is enough thickness in the silicone to actually give. if you press all the goo out, it's not thick enough to flex

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now comes the key.

 

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shitty cheap flat black acrylic spray paint.

 

what you do with it is cut back the masking film on the plexi to make a "fringe" that will get painted black. I don't know what this does or does not do for sticking the window to the boat, but it makes the installation look fan-fucking-tastic.

here I am spraying the edges.

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this is the shit we are using to attach the window to the frame. it flexes a helluva lot more than that superglue they used in the first place.

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so you put a shit-ton of it in the groove, center the window, push it in until you push all you can out, then smooth the gap. I used a westmarine stir stick because it has that nice rounded edge.

 

do this wet. then pull all the tape and the masking film off of the window, while still wet.

 

finished product looks like this:

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one last shot, showing my oopsie moment.

 

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one corner wouldn't lay flat. so we used a net, some lines and bungie cord and sail ties to put some pressure there and left it for the day.

 

they look fantastic.

 

now all i need to do is go back and buff/polish the new gelcoat. I didn't want to do that before the windows because I didn't want to contaminate the recess before i put the windows in.

 

I'll do that after the boat is waterproof again.

 

it does feel good to have windows again.

 

-m

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Damn dude, incredible job. You've become quite the chemist, between the bottom paint and gel coat repairs. I always did love those angular ports.

 

Did Maritime Plastics use the same material for the windows that the originals were?

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This makes me SO happy to have the old-school aluminum frame ports that C&C used in the 60s-early 70s :D Those are not so hard to do. I used a Sika-Flex product to glue new plexi into the frames and have had no trouble since. The prevailing wisdom on the C&C mailing lis for these new types is to use Plexus to glue new ports in. You seem to be going the other direction and using a flexible sealant to allow the joint to work. It is good you fixed it. I recently saw a C&C 38 where the cracks had allowed enough water to get into the cabin side fiberglass to actually freeze and make a crack the whole way through :o

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This makes me SO happy to have the old-school aluminum frame ports that C&C used in the 60s-early 70s :D Those are not so hard to do. I used a Sika-Flex product to glue new plexi into the frames and have had no trouble since. The prevailing wisdom on the C&C mailing lis for these new types is to use Plexus to glue new ports in. You seem to be going the other direction and using a flexible sealant to allow the joint to work. It is good you fixed it. I recently saw a C&C 38 where the cracks had allowed enough water to get into the cabin side fiberglass to actually freeze and make a crack the whole way through :o

 

yeah, i saw all the prevailing wisdom.

 

but 2 things swayed me:

1. have to own some wacky special caulking gun to use the plexus stuff

2. The owner of A-M-P installs with this stuff every day. he puts his company's name and reputation on the line with it. and no special tools. good enough with me.

 

and Ajax, AMP did use the same material as the original, but ofcourse without scratches and shit.

 

-M

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This makes me SO happy to have the old-school aluminum frame ports that C&C used in the 60s-early 70s :D Those are not so hard to do. I used a Sika-Flex product to glue new plexi into the frames and have had no trouble since. The prevailing wisdom on the C&C mailing lis for these new types is to use Plexus to glue new ports in. You seem to be going the other direction and using a flexible sealant to allow the joint to work. It is good you fixed it. I recently saw a C&C 38 where the cracks had allowed enough water to get into the cabin side fiberglass to actually freeze and make a crack the whole way through :o

 

yeah, i saw all the prevailing wisdom.

 

but 2 things swayed me:

1. have to own some wacky special caulking gun to use the plexus stuff

2. The owner of A-M-P installs with this stuff every day. he puts his company's name and reputation on the line with it. and no special tools. good enough with me.

 

and Ajax, AMP did use the same material as the original, but ofcourse without scratches and shit.

 

-M

 

This project should earn you serious points with the wifey. I know she likes her cruiser to be dry and clean.

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Yup Silpruf is the bomb for this. About 1/3 the cost of Sikaflex 295 but very similar strength and stretch properties. The key is to use a thick enough layer i.e. 1/4" for small windows like these. Sikaflex has some thickness guidelines on their website.

 

In my experience the spray on black paint lasts about 4 years in the tropics before it starts peeling. Should have done 2 coats :(

 

But my 2m x 1m windows don't leak after 4 years.

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Yup Silpruf is the bomb for this. About 1/3 the cost of Sikaflex 295 but very similar strength and stretch properties. The key is to use a thick enough layer i.e. 1/4" for small windows like these. Sikaflex has some thickness guidelines on their website.

 

In my experience the spray on black paint lasts about 4 years in the tropics before it starts peeling. Should have done 2 coats :(

 

But my 2m x 1m windows don't leak after 4 years.

 

to clarify, the spray paint is on the "inside" it's between the window and the Silpruf.

 

The outside surface is unpainted, and all lexan.

 

I am thinking that the UV qualities of the lexan will help prevent major sundamage to the paint under it. and I did about 5 coats to be sure.

 

Ajax, the wife looked at the job 1/2 done, looked at the finished side and said "that's sexy hon!"

 

to which my 8-year old son said "Mom, is that a bad word? what does it mean?"

 

open mouth, insert foot. glad it was the wife and not me? :D

 

-M

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Great job on the windows! That black paint on the glass is called fritting. Many if not most cars today have fritting around their non-opening windows because they install the windows with adhesive. It helps hide the adhesive and window framing. We do the same thing on our boats but the fritting is an integral part of the glass when we get it.

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Since i am about to embark on this project myself in the next week or so on my C&C 32, I have some questions:

Does the black paint on the inside of the window compromise the adherence of the glue; since the glue is now sticking to the paint and not the lexan?

Does the glue come in Black, thus negating the need to paint anything?

Finally, it's not quite clear from the pictures to me: where did you put the double sided foam tape, and how thick was it?

 

I am very impressed with the finished product you have there.

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Great job Keith. I'm going to put a new window or two in this spring. I'm using a different plastic shop and Plexus again. Heck, I bought the gun, might as well use it. I have the long, one piece windows. The way the cabin flexes, I doubt that silicone would hold them in. Great work on the gelcoat repair. I need to get better at that, because I lost some gelcoat this time around too.

 

Jake

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1334618285[/url]' post='3675499']

Since i am about to embark on this project myself in the next week or so on my C&C 32, I have some questions:

Does the black paint on the inside of the window compromise the adherence of the glue; since the glue is now sticking to the paint and not the lexan?

Does the glue come in Black, thus negating the need to paint anything?

Finally, it's not quite clear from the pictures to me: where did you put the double sided foam tape, and how thick was it?

 

I am very impressed with the finished product you have there.

 

Yeah. It's impressive.

Welcome aboard. Now HTFU and show us your wife's/girlfriend's tits.

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Great job Keith. I'm going to put a new window or two in this spring. I'm using a different plastic shop and Plexus again. Heck, I bought the gun, might as well use it. I have the long, one piece windows. The way the cabin flexes, I doubt that silicone would hold them in. Great work on the gelcoat repair. I need to get better at that, because I lost some gelcoat this time around too.

 

Jake

 

Welcome aboard Jake.

And we need to see some tits, and you have to watch this as part of the welcoming ritual:

 

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Since i am about to embark on this project myself in the next week or so on my C&C 32, I have some questions:

Does the black paint on the inside of the window compromise the adherence of the glue; since the glue is now sticking to the paint and not the lexan?

Does the glue come in Black, thus negating the need to paint anything?

Finally, it's not quite clear from the pictures to me: where did you put the double sided foam tape, and how thick was it?

 

I am very impressed with the finished product you have there.

 

Certainly if the paint doesn't hold, the window won't either. Time will tell for me. However, like I said above, this is exactly what the pro in 'Nappytown does. I'm relying on his experience in this area.

 

The tape is on the inner edge of the recess. it really does 3 things (I mentioned the first two above. the 3rd thing it does is prevent tons of silicone from smooshing INTO the cabin. it acts as a barrier, and forces all the extra silicone thru the gap on the OUTSIDE of the boat where it's easy to clean up.

 

The tape was about 1/8" thick or so. going from memory because the stuff is not close at hand. I had to buy a 50' roll, of which I'm sure I used much much much less than half. if you are close I may be convinced to give it to you for a case of beer or something.

 

The silicone is black in color. you may not need it. but you will be able to see thru the window at whatever sins are under there. bubbles, chips, whatever. at least I am just ignorant of whatever problems are down there, because it's not like you can "fix" a bubble. you'd have to remove the whole window. nah, not going to go there.

 

and somebody mentioned "fritting". exactly. I learned vaguely about this when Safelite Autoglass replaced my front windshield. the fritting is apparently needed for car windows because the adhesive for cars is not UV stable, so they have to cover it.

 

in my case i'm sure that the spray paint fritting helps, but who knows.

 

-M

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Since i am about to embark on this project myself in the next week or so on my C&C 32, I have some questions:

Does the black paint on the inside of the window compromise the adherence of the glue; since the glue is now sticking to the paint and not the lexan?

Does the glue come in Black, thus negating the need to paint anything?

Finally, it's not quite clear from the pictures to me: where did you put the double sided foam tape, and how thick was it?

 

I am very impressed with the finished product you have there.

 

Certainly if the paint doesn't hold, the window won't either. Time will tell for me. However, like I said above, this is exactly what the pro in 'Nappytown does. I'm relying on his experience in this area.

 

The tape is on the inner edge of the recess. it really does 3 things (I mentioned the first two above. the 3rd thing it does is prevent tons of silicone from smooshing INTO the cabin. it acts as a barrier, and forces all the extra silicone thru the gap on the OUTSIDE of the boat where it's easy to clean up.

 

The tape was about 1/8" thick or so. going from memory because the stuff is not close at hand. I had to buy a 50' roll, of which I'm sure I used much much much less than half. if you are close I may be convinced to give it to you for a case of beer or something.

 

The silicone is black in color. you may not need it. but you will be able to see thru the window at whatever sins are under there. bubbles, chips, whatever. at least I am just ignorant of whatever problems are down there, because it's not like you can "fix" a bubble. you'd have to remove the whole window. nah, not going to go there.

 

and somebody mentioned "fritting". exactly. I learned vaguely about this when Safelite Autoglass replaced my front windshield. the fritting is apparently needed for car windows because the adhesive for cars is not UV stable, so they have to cover it.

 

in my case i'm sure that the spray paint fritting helps, but who knows.

 

-M

 

You may have been better off with the Krylon Fusion spray paint, which bonds well with acrylic, but I'm sure the extra UV will help the bond, and it sure looks better than the "every bubble and smear" look on my windows, since I used white LifeSeal with 2404 bronze acrylic. I may paint the outside with some "flash fritting" since I'll be fooked if I take a nice dry install out because it looks ugly from the outside.

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Actual glass bonded windows use a ceramic coating called a frit or fritting to protect the flexible silicon. It's not a DIY application. I would be a bit worried about the paint/window bond being not as strong as a glue/window bond. Krylon might be an exception because it is designed to bond with plastic well. Garden variety spray paint not so much.

 

From recollection the Silpruf tensile was about 150 psi and shear was similar. It has great elongation characteristics as well, so if your cabin is flexy it will absorb a lot of motion. In most catamarans that have big bonded windows I would say the windows do form a structural element - and cats tend to flex a bit.

 

Data sheet for Silpruf structral glazing silicone:

http://www.siliconeforbuilding.com/pdf/weatherseal/Data_Sheet_SCS2000_SilPruf_P.pdf

 

and Sikaflex 295 (use 296 for glass, 295 for plastics):

http://www.sika.com.au/cmi/pdfs/TDS_Sikaflex295UV.pdf

 

How to guide from Sikaflex (big file, 1.7 MB)

http://us01.webdms.sika.com/fileshow.do?documentID=1288

 

Guide was very useful last time I checked. Gives guidance on thickness required based on window dimensions (and thus elongation due to temperature changes)

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Oy, Oy, Oy!....like the video; now can someone answer me my questions three?

 

dude, keep yer britches on! :P

 

seriously though, I wasn't ignoring; I was driving home, eating dinner, and putting the children to bed. the 3 yr old was quite a pain last night. For the parents out there, google "samuel L Jackson Go the Fuck to Sleep".

priceless.

 

-m

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Actual glass bonded windows use a ceramic coating called a frit or fritting to protect the flexible silicon. It's not a DIY application. I would be a bit worried about the paint/window bond being not as strong as a glue/window bond. Krylon might be an exception because it is designed to bond with plastic well. Garden variety spray paint not so much.

 

From recollection the Silpruf tensile was about 150 psi and shear was similar. It has great elongation characteristics as well, so if your cabin is flexy it will absorb a lot of motion. In most catamarans that have big bonded windows I would say the windows do form a structural element - and cats tend to flex a bit.

 

Data sheet for Silpruf structral glazing silicone:

http://www.siliconeforbuilding.com/pdf/weatherseal/Data_Sheet_SCS2000_SilPruf_P.pdf

 

and Sikaflex 295 (use 296 for glass, 295 for plastics):

http://www.sika.com.au/cmi/pdfs/TDS_Sikaflex295UV.pdf

 

How to guide from Sikaflex (big file, 1.7 MB)

http://us01.webdms.sika.com/fileshow.do?documentID=1288

 

Guide was very useful last time I checked. Gives guidance on thickness required based on window dimensions (and thus elongation due to temperature changes)

 

who knows, the special krylon for plastic might have been better. too late now!!!!

 

but frankly, I chatted with the owner of A-M-P for a long time and he swears by the cheapo spray paint. he says his best source used to be teh generic shit you got at K-Mart! not kidding!!

I had to settle for a step up to "Do It Best" generic flat black. oh well.

 

-m

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who knows, the special krylon for plastic might have been better. too late now!!!!

 

but frankly, I chatted with the owner of A-M-P for a long time and he swears by the cheapo spray paint. he says his best source used to be teh generic shit you got at K-Mart! not kidding!!

I had to settle for a step up to "Do It Best" generic flat black. oh well.

 

-m

 

Nope. You dig those windows out and do it right, Meester!

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Oy, Oy, Oy!....like the video; now can someone answer me my questions three?

 

dude, keep yer britches on! :P

 

seriously though, I wasn't ignoring; I was driving home, eating dinner, and putting the children to bed. the 3 yr old was quite a pain last night. For the parents out there, google "samuel L Jackson Go the Fuck to Sleep".

priceless.

 

-m

 

Tom Waits delivered my favorite for this purpose-

 

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A question - how much is the gap between the window edges and the hull frame? I'm going to be pulling my windows this weekend coming up and I suspect my windows are too tight. But I'm not sure how much of a gap I should go with...

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A question - how much is the gap between the window edges and the hull frame? I'm going to be pulling my windows this weekend coming up and I suspect my windows are too tight. But I'm not sure how much of a gap I should go with...

 

I would say the gap is 1/8" to 3/16" all around. It's not huge, just enough for one thin bead of caulk to fill it nicely.

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A question - how much is the gap between the window edges and the hull frame? I'm going to be pulling my windows this weekend coming up and I suspect my windows are too tight. But I'm not sure how much of a gap I should go with...

 

I would say the gap is 1/8" to 3/16" all around. It's not huge, just enough for one thin bead of caulk to fill it nicely.

 

right, that's about what I have.

 

-M

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A question - how much is the gap between the window edges and the hull frame? I'm going to be pulling my windows this weekend coming up and I suspect my windows are too tight. But I'm not sure how much of a gap I should go with...

 

I would say the gap is 1/8" to 3/16" all around. It's not huge, just enough for one thin bead of caulk to fill it nicely.

 

right, that's about what I have.

 

-M

OK, that's not what I've got. Mine is almost flush at some points, maybe 1/16th. Will be adjusting things. My windows also have a chamfer on the inside, not sure what the intent of that was.

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A question - how much is the gap between the window edges and the hull frame? I'm going to be pulling my windows this weekend coming up and I suspect my windows are too tight. But I'm not sure how much of a gap I should go with...

 

I would say the gap is 1/8" to 3/16" all around. It's not huge, just enough for one thin bead of caulk to fill it nicely.

 

right, that's about what I have.

 

-M

OK, that's not what I've got. Mine is almost flush at some points, maybe 1/16th. Will be adjusting things. My windows also have a chamfer on the inside, not sure what the intent of that was.

 

The chamfer is standard, I think it gives any extra goop somewhere to go besides out of the joint.

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Oy, Oy, Oy!....like the video; now can someone answer me my questions three?

 

dude, keep yer britches on! :P

 

seriously though, I wasn't ignoring; I was driving home, eating dinner, and putting the children to bed. the 3 yr old was quite a pain last night. For the parents out there, google "samuel L Jackson Go the Fuck to Sleep".

priceless.

 

-m

 

 

Bought the book and read it to the girls at the dinner table.

 

We lol'd

 

I'm a bad dad.

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Oy, Oy, Oy!....like the video; now can someone answer me my questions three?

 

dude, keep yer britches on! :P

 

seriously though, I wasn't ignoring; I was driving home, eating dinner, and putting the children to bed. the 3 yr old was quite a pain last night. For the parents out there, google "samuel L Jackson Go the Fuck to Sleep".

priceless.

 

-m

 

 

Bought the book and read it to the girls at the dinner table.

 

We lol'd

 

I'm a bad dad.

 

 

or..... BEST DAD EVARRRRRRR!!!11!!!1!11!1!!!

 

omfg ttyl

 

-m

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Oy, Oy, Oy!....like the video; now can someone answer me my questions three?

 

dude, keep yer britches on! :P

 

seriously though, I wasn't ignoring; I was driving home, eating dinner, and putting the children to bed. the 3 yr old was quite a pain last night. For the parents out there, google "samuel L Jackson Go the Fuck to Sleep".

priceless.

 

-m

 

 

Bought the book and read it to the girls at the dinner table.

 

We lol'd

 

I'm a bad dad.

 

 

or..... BEST DAD EVARRRRRRR!!!11!!!1!11!1!!!

 

omfg ttyl

 

-m

 

Wow dude. I'm a little embarassed to know you at the moment. Wow :blink:

 

We have the book as well. I have had fun reading it, but haven't read it to the baby yet. She seems to like Dr Seuss, although, I forgot how trippy some of the illustrations are.

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These type window gaskets seem to always be either leaking, or about to leak...Mr's solution seems to be the final solution. I think I'll epoxy a flange inside and bolt the "glass" down with the sealer forming a gasket.

 

Since GK is painted now. It won't be too hard to match the colour. I'll just paint the whole coach side.

 

 

I hate that aluminum frame work.

post-25646-096719800 1335211572_thumb.jpg

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regarding leaks. This is the only sure way to make sure the boat doesn't leak:

 

1.) disassemble boat

2.) put in dumpster

 

 

I can't tell you how many times my mind wondered while i was sanding and filling and fairing.

I thought about how 5 gallons of gas and a match would fix my leaky windows right quick.

but instead I held on to finish.

-M

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks to the excellent photos, my boat partner and I were inspired to fix our windows up.

 

all the goo (sikaflex 295 UV) in place after 1 day of curing/drying. Forward window with 209 primer started on it.

 

IMG_8445.jpg

 

 

Inside of window with 1/8 double sided foam glazing tape from findtape.com

 

IMG_8451.jpg

 

finished product with the really nice looking pitch-black 209 primer and 1/8 inch of 295 UV.

 

IMG_8448.jpg

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  • 1 month later...

:D Thanks

I'm in the process of replacing the windpws on my 1984 C&C 24 right now and am going to use this as my step by step guide, you know that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Thanks for your effort and the great job you did putting this together with such detail. There is a lot of info out there but you have put it all together perfectly!!!!!!!!!

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:D Thanks

I'm in the process of replacing the windpws on my 1984 C&C 24 right now and am going to use this as my step by step guide, you know that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Thanks for your effort and the great job you did putting this together with such detail. There is a lot of info out there but you have put it all together perfectly!!!!!!!!!

 

thanks for the complement....but caveat emptor: these windows have been leak-tight for all of 2 months. I will report back after the winter (when cracks and wierd shit always happens) as to whether they are still leak-tight or not.

 

-M

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  • 1 month later...

Mmmm... good bump.

 

Mrgnstrn- We've had some heavy rain to break the drought recently. Any updates? Still dry?

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still dry....however, we haven't reached the critical test.

 

since installed, the weather has only varied ~30F degrees from what they were installed at (~70F).

 

After the haulout and winter closes in, then we will see the reall test....temps down toward 20F or lower. Plus, being blocked instead of floating seems to put weird stresses on the windows, and more cracks. all my cracks have started in winter and exacerbated in summer.

 

so.....time will tell, but they are leak tight so far.

 

-M

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I am going to do the same repair but will likely add small screws on the corners to keep pressure against the radius.

 

I think it's a brilliant and permanent solution to a problem that many Canadian built boats suffer from. Well done.

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I OTOH love those frames. Replacing and sealing the ports was an afternoon project, no exotic materials required, and they do not leak a drop B)

I used Sikaflex on the inside and wedged in a rubber screen gasket with washers on the outside to hold it in place. After the caulk dried, I removed the washes and caulked the outside too. I also doubled the thickness of the plexi.

 

These type window gaskets seem to always be either leaking, or about to leak...Mr's solution seems to be the final solution. I think I'll epoxy a flange inside and bolt the "glass" down with the sealer forming a gasket.

 

Since GK is painted now. It won't be too hard to match the colour. I'll just paint the whole coach side.

 

 

I hate that aluminum frame work.

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Great job on the windows! That black paint on the glass is called fritting. Many if not most cars today have fritting around their non-opening windows because they install the windows with adhesive. It helps hide the adhesive and window framing. We do the same thing on our boats but the fritting is an integral part of the glass when we get it.

 

Auto glass frit is to protect the urethane from UV degradation. It is an organic compound.

 

Very nice job! I'm in the glass business and can appreciate the work you did and the look you got.

 

If you ever need to cut a window out, give me a call. www.glassbot.net

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K65YrN9NUlg&feature=player_embedded

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Great job on the windows! That black paint on the glass is called fritting. Many if not most cars today have fritting around their non-opening windows because they install the windows with adhesive. It helps hide the adhesive and window framing. We do the same thing on our boats but the fritting is an integral part of the glass when we get it.

 

Auto glass frit is to protect the urethane from UV degradation. It is an organic compound.

 

Very nice job! I'm in the glass business and can appreciate the work you did and the look you got.

 

If you ever need to cut a window out, give me a call. www.glassbot.net

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K65YrN9NUlg&feature=player_embedded

 

Oh yeah, forgot to mention that, plus we use a UV resistant caulk between the exterior edge of the glass and its surround or a trim ring to protect the adhesive.

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  • 5 months later...

ah ha, found the thread I needed.

 

so, the concensus on what paint to use for the fritting was ???

just s*it enamel paint, or is there something better to go onto acrylic?

 

there is no concensus.

 

I've not had leaks, but winter is not over, and I haven't been relaunched. that's the critical test: blocking and launching.

 

I think i'd still do it the way the pro told me: shitty cheap flat black paint.

 

--------however....there are some caveats with spray painting.-------

 

If you look closely at the can, it will say to either do ALL of hte painting within an hour or so.....or wait 24 hrs between coats.

---something about the volatiles coming out and screwing up overcoats or not. i'm not a chemist, but the PRO I talked to told me to pay very close attention to that so as to not screw up the fritting.

 

 

-M

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