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Writing from a country that owns a number of second hand submarines, it seems to me that giving such a craft to a drug cartel would be a great way to immediately bankrupt their operation.

Yeah, the boat looks like shit.  But they're smiling, which is the reason to sail......

This is what happens when you wear socks with sandals.

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Couldn't decide if it's ugly or cool, but only one cup of coffee in me so far so it wound up here.

 

All that keel, all that mast, and ALL that boom, but not much boat.

 

datsaboom.jpg

 

 

Definitely cool - anything with that much rig to boat ratio has to be cool. Doubly so since it's so old school.

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My hometown is Maine, USA; where Tyvek is a key exterior building material. I've written to DuPont explaining what a missed market opportunity they have, but strangely they ignore me.

 

Do you suppose there is a business opportunity in selling Tyvek printed with a pattern that looks like conventional siding?

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Couldn't decide if it's ugly or cool, but only one cup of coffee in me so far so it wound up here.

 

All that keel, all that mast, and ALL that boom, but not much boat.

 

datsaboom.jpg

 

...and don't forget ALL those guys hanging off a plank for righting moment!

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I looked it up on the Roberts website, Olaf. Here are some more photos of another..

 

 

I managed to avoid noticing that dodger. It's too big.

 

Is there anywhere to sit in that cockpit? Is that really a cockpit? Where are you supposed to nap? Inside is not an answer. That's where you sleep, not nap.

 

Good effort Tom....

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

It's not such a bad little tree, Charlie Brown!

 

I like this boat, it's very 'workman like', and reminds me of a Main Lobster boat.

 

It's just the ports that ruin the yellow one. The color doesn't help either.

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Couldn't decide if it's ugly or cool, but only one cup of coffee in me so far so it wound up here.

 

All that keel, all that mast, and ALL that boom, but not much boat.

 

datsaboom.jpg

 

 

Definitely cool - anything with that much rig to boat ratio has to be cool. Doubly so since it's so old school.

 

This looks like Nassau in the Bahamas. There used to be a few boats in that fenced compound and these were the Family Island Regatta style of Bahamian sloops. This one looks like an A class which would be about 28 foot on deck. They are generally deeper draft and have fuller sections that the Anguillan sloops but those are getting more burdensome recently. The Bahamian sloops are decked unlike the Anguilla boats which are open. The Bahamian sloops have 2x12's that slide under an iron 'staple' on deck at the CL much like a International Canoes sliding seat. Class A have three 'prys' as they are know and 4 or five big Island boys sitting out for stability. Something to see!

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My hometown is Maine, USA; where Tyvek is a key exterior building material. I've written to DuPont explaining what a missed market opportunity they have, but strangely they ignore me.

 

Do you suppose there is a business opportunity in selling Tyvek printed with a pattern that looks like conventional siding?

 

Oh fer sure....

 

451.jpg

 

Imagine that with a conventional siding printed on it? How many more projects could be considered "completed" if it was?

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Good example here of a Bahamian sloop. They generally have a Dutch style headboard on the mainsail that is really more of a gaff that I've never seen used in Anguilla.

 

207.JPG

 

It is a shame what the builder did to Bob's design. You can tell a West Indian, but you can't tell him much! I don't say that to sound racist as I lived in the Antilles for over twenty years and love and respect the Island watermen, but they can be a cantankerous bunch, as watermen can be most places. Odd that when I went to Anguilla and started measuring their racing sloops and taking off the lines, the local builders were very interested and cordial after their first 'What you be doin der me son?' I brought photos I had taken of the Bahamian style sloops to share with them at the waterfront rum shops and they had almost no knowledge that a similar rebirth of the traditional boat building scene was taking place there. Or vice versa. Years later they were argueing who was stealing the others design and technology! Just like on the AC threads here today...

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My hometown is Maine, USA; where Tyvek is a key exterior building material. I've written to DuPont explaining what a missed market opportunity they have, but strangely they ignore me.

 

Do you suppose there is a business opportunity in selling Tyvek printed with a pattern that looks like conventional siding?

 

Oh fer sure....

 

451.jpg

 

Imagine that with a conventional siding printed on it? How many more projects could be considered "completed" if it was?

 

Maybe we can get Tyvek to print seamlines and reef gaskets on the material for when I build the sails for my Island Sloop.

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Good example here of a Bahamian sloop. They generally have a Dutch style headboard on the mainsail that is really more of a gaff that I've never seen used in Anguilla.

 

207.JPG

 

It is a shame what the builder did to Bob's design. You can tell a West Indian, but you can't tell him much! I don't say that to sound racist as I lived in the Antilles for over twenty years and love and respect the Island watermen, but they can be a cantankerous bunch, as watermen can be most places. Odd that when I went to Anguilla and started measuring their racing sloops and taking off the lines, the local builders were very interested and cordial after their first 'What you be doin der me son?' I brought photos I had taken of the Bahamian style sloops to share with them at the waterfront rum shops and they had almost no knowledge that a similar rebirth of the traditional boat building scene was taking place there. Or vice versa. Years later they were argueing who was stealing the others design and technology! Just like on the AC threads here today...

Nice looking boat. Shame about that sail though.

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It is a shame what the builder did to Bob's design. You can tell a West Indian, but you can't tell him much! I don't say that to sound racist as I lived in the Antilles for over twenty years and love and respect the Island watermen, but they can be a cantankerous bunch, as watermen can be most places. Odd that when I went to Anguilla and started measuring their racing sloops and taking off the lines, the local builders were very interested and cordial after their first 'What you be doin der me son?' I brought photos I had taken of the Bahamian style sloops to share with them at the waterfront rum shops and they had almost no knowledge that a similar rebirth of the traditional boat building scene was taking place there. Or vice versa. Years later they were argueing who was stealing the others design and technology! Just like on the AC threads here today...

 

Good story!

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Good example here of a Bahamian sloop. They generally have a Dutch style headboard on the mainsail that is really more of a gaff that I've never seen used in Anguilla.

 

207.JPG

 

It is a shame what the builder did to Bob's design. You can tell a West Indian, but you can't tell him much! I don't say that to sound racist as I lived in the Antilles for over twenty years and love and respect the Island watermen, but they can be a cantankerous bunch, as watermen can be most places. Odd that when I went to Anguilla and started measuring their racing sloops and taking off the lines, the local builders were very interested and cordial after their first 'What you be doin der me son?' I brought photos I had taken of the Bahamian style sloops to share with them at the waterfront rum shops and they had almost no knowledge that a similar rebirth of the traditional boat building scene was taking place there. Or vice versa. Years later they were argueing who was stealing the others design and technology! Just like on the AC threads here today...

Nice looking boat. Shame about that sail though.

 

It's like dogs and their people, the mainsail trimmer and mainsail look like each other !

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These races in the Bahamas and Anguilla must be something like the sandbagger races in NYC a hundred years ago, the idea being to push a relatively heavy hull as fast as possible with huge sail area and movable ballast.

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Nice looking boat. Shame about that sail though.

 

 

Shame for the sail? I think it looks pretty good for being seamed parallel to the leech in cotton! They do love some draft though and that deep curve in the foot is supposed to provide end plate effect against the deck when close hauled. When they reach off, they let some halyard off so the foot drops right down to the waters surface for an even more effective endplate. The halyard trick has pretty much replaced the use of 'water sails' which were like a jib turned sideways with the luff along the boom.

 

Can't find a photo of a Bahamian example of a 'water sail' but it must be a Dutch thing like the main headboard but here is a look.

 

spesmea_zeilen.jpg

 

 

j2vbc91u.jpg

 

Not sure what you would call the example above?

 

356204-1211G-Huey.jpg

 

Here is healthy looking bunch of fellas.

 

IMG_3421.jpg

 

And a better look at the headboard/gaff.

 

So in this small boatbuilding community, there are examples of end plate aerodynamics, massive moveable ballast with hiking racks, and probably the highest SA/wetted surface ratio you will ever find. And they have been doing this for nearly 100 years!

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This girl would be real popular with some of those Bahamian racers. They like a bit of meat on their women... And she can get out to the moored boats on her own!

 

sail_skis.jpg

First ever boardsailer maybe? I can see why the concept didn't catch on.

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Nice looking boat. Shame about that sail though.

 

 

Shame for the sail? I think it looks pretty good for being seamed parallel to the leech in cotton! They do love some draft though and that deep curve in the foot is supposed to provide end plate effect against the deck when close hauled. When they reach off, they let some halyard off so the foot drops right down to the waters surface for an even more effective endplate. The halyard trick has pretty much replaced the use of 'water sails' which were like a jib turned sideways with the luff along the boom.

 

Can't find a photo of a Bahamian example of a 'water sail' but it must be a Dutch thing like the main headboard but here is a look.

 

spesmea_zeilen.jpg

 

 

j2vbc91u.jpg

 

Not sure what you would call the example above?

 

356204-1211G-Huey.jpg

 

Here is healthy looking bunch of fellas.

 

IMG_3421.jpg

 

And a better look at the headboard/gaff.

 

So in this small boatbuilding community, there are examples of end plate aerodynamics, massive moveable ballast with hiking racks, and probably the highest SA/wetted surface ratio you will ever find. And they have been doing this for nearly 100 years!

Love the hull lines though. I could see something here - moving the mast aft a tad, adding a decent gaff, a nice long bowsprit and stay sails.

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Couldn't decide if it's ugly or cool, but only one cup of coffee in me so far so it wound up here.

 

All that keel, all that mast, and ALL that boom, but not much boat.

 

datsaboom.jpg

 

Extra respect to the crew as it is not likely to have much if any ballast and will rely on crew weight to keep it upright. Possibly they may use 'prys' or planks wedged across the boat allowing serious hiking.

 

NOTE TO SELF read the whole thread before adding a reply.

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Love the hull lines though. I could see something here - moving the mast aft a tad, adding a decent gaff, a nice long bowsprit and stay sails.

 

 

If you're interested, there will be an opportunity coming up for acquiring an Island Sloop that is 22' foot long with a less extreme rig. She has been a tourist daysail boat for 15 years and has a comfortable cockpit seating arrangment. She has won her class at Foxy's Wooden Boat Regatta a number of times. The eco-resort at which she has been sailing has lost their lease and it closing but she would still be a fine daysailer just about anywhere. PM me for details, I'm not sure when she will be available but probably at the end of the winter season.

 

 

 

 

St John Island Sloop Circa 1860

Built in Coral Bay ~ 1998

  • 23 ft overall
  • 8ft beam
  • 3 1/2 ft draft
  • 2 tons
  • Spanish ceder-planked hull
  • Awlgrip finish on hull
  • Mast and Boom hemlock fir
  • Dacron sails ~ Manfred Dietrich

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Why is everone suddenly being nice when the thread is about commenting unfavourably on someone's pride and joy?

 

Are we being sensitive and nice?

 

My racing buddies ragged me when I decided to sail on 4ksb for a couple of Sydney Hobarts. It was a `tail end charlie' weather beaten 30 year old shitter (as they liked to call it). However it has sailed more miles than all the boats in the race put together and it is my buddies who don't get the cred that the boat has and why I wanted to go for a sail on it. To me she is a greyhound.

 

It really didn't bother me just as it doesn't bother TQA (and BTW I didn't think the 38 was that ugly ).

 

So can we just get back to criticising ugly boats and stop being so `nice'?

Now, hang on there.

Check the thread title- see the word "admiration" up there?

Some boats deserve criticism, some boats deserve admiration, all the boats in this thread rate discussion.

if somebody's got an ugly boat worth criticising, don't hold back, throw it down...

but then prepare to explain to the class, why, in your opinion, it is ugly.

I think things got nice because the selection of boats got less ugly. Or we have learned to look at boats differently based on the feedback here.

See, that is what I think makes this thread interesting. There has been a lot of good info in this thread, because if one can explain why they think a boat is ugly, it also explains what it takes for a boat to be beautiful.

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Nice looking boat. Shame about that sail though.

 

 

Shame for the sail? I think it looks pretty good for being seamed parallel to the leech in cotton! They do love some draft though and that deep curve in the foot is supposed to provide end plate effect against the deck when close hauled. When they reach off, they let some halyard off so the foot drops right down to the waters surface for an even more effective endplate. The halyard trick has pretty much replaced the use of 'water sails' which were like a jib turned sideways with the luff along the boom.

 

Can't find a photo of a Bahamian example of a 'water sail' but it must be a Dutch thing like the main headboard but here is a look.

 

spesmea_zeilen.jpg

 

 

j2vbc91u.jpg

 

Not sure what you would call the example above?

 

356204-1211G-Huey.jpg

 

Here is healthy looking bunch of fellas.

 

IMG_3421.jpg

 

And a better look at the headboard/gaff.

 

So in this small boatbuilding community, there are examples of end plate aerodynamics, massive moveable ballast with hiking racks, and probably the highest SA/wetted surface ratio you will ever find. And they have been doing this for nearly 100 years!

Even a bulging hessian sack looks pretty good, stuffed with coffee beans and double stitched seams. Probably be about as effective upwind as this bag too. Efficient aerofoil shape? Not so much.

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Couldn't decide if it's ugly or cool, but only one cup of coffee in me so far so it wound up here.

 

All that keel, all that mast, and ALL that boom, but not much boat.

 

datsaboom.jpg

 

 

Definitely cool - anything with that much rig to boat ratio has to be cool. Doubly so since it's so old school.

 

This looks like Nassau in the Bahamas. There used to be a few boats in that fenced compound and these were the Family Island Regatta style of Bahamian sloops. This one looks like an A class which would be about 28 foot on deck. They are generally deeper draft and have fuller sections that the Anguillan sloops but those are getting more burdensome recently. The Bahamian sloops are decked unlike the Anguilla boats which are open. The Bahamian sloops have 2x12's that slide under an iron 'staple' on deck at the CL much like a International Canoes sliding seat. Class A have three 'prys' as they are know and 4 or five big Island boys sitting out for stability. Something to see!

 

 

Right you are. I was amazed by the Man-O-War boats in the Abacos. Never saw one sail, but when they told me how such a little boat could hold such a big sail, I almost didn't believe it. But they had pics, so it did happen. It must be a pretty mad scramble to get all those guys off the plank, shift it across the boat, and get them all back out on it when tacking.

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I was at a couple of the out island regattas in the 90s down in the Exumas. I loved the starts.

 

The boats would be at anchor with sails down until the start gun/horn/shout was heard. But of course there was always someone who would try to gain an advantage either by pulling in on the anchor or part raising the sail.

 

So all starts were punctuated by " Boat ?? NO HAULING NO HAULING"

 

Post start not all boats would choose the same tack so there were some interesting manouvres and small wars between boats locked together. Dennis Conner would have loved it!

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Best starts in the Island sloops was down in Anguilla where they sometimes would do a downwind start from the beach. The Anguilla boats were still mean't to be hauled on log rollers up on the beach after the rigs and ballast were taken out. Not as deep in section or keel as the Bahamian boats for that reason. The morning of a race the crews would drag their boats to the waters edge and sit on the gunnel to heel it over and others would carry the round ballast stones from the pile nest to where the boat had been stored. With the gunnel right down near the wl, it was easy to hand the stones over the rail to the 'ballast man'. He was usually an older much respected member of the crew and he had the ultimate authority on the order and placement of the stones which were numbered in paint for reference. The stones would be piled up on the side to which the boat was heeled which let the crew who had been holding the rail down join the others carrying the stones. While still rail down and side to the beach, the mast would be carried out with the main laced to it and rolled from the leach and loosely brailed by a light line to the masthead wound spirally around the mast and sail. I'm not sure that the mast and sail could have been stepped in this manner if the boat was on an even keel but with it heeled 45 degrees it didn't seem to be much of a problem. Once the rig was in the partners and shrouds and forestay attached and some extra sandbags on board, the the boat was pushed out a bit deeper and the stones would be evenly distributed to trim boat to an even keel. The sandbags were laid over the stones to keep them from rolling about and also to create a foundation for pig iron pigs, 4"x4" in section by about 30 inches long. These must have weighed nearly a couple hundred pounds and had three or four strops of sail tie secured about them as they were manhandled to the high side when racing. The number of pigs was according to the anticipated wind strength and under the ballast masters provenance.

 

In the meantime, the skipper and the rockstars in the crew would be on the beach drinking beer and rum and sucking down chicken legs and 'johhnycake' from the foodstalls which lined the beach. Each boat had its mob of loyal supporters who would provide these items as well as other forms of moral and immoral support. At some point some sort of signal, a flag or horn (conch?) would signal a loose indication that racing was about to commence. The fever pitch among the crowd and crews would increase and the ballast and rig crew would release the brails and outhaul the clew of the huge main. With the running rigging ready, there would be a stout piece of line from one corner of the transom run to a even stouter stake driven deep in the sand at the waters edge. A few turns round the anchor stake and the the bitter end would be led to an eager gang of volunteers. The boats would then be turned facing bow downwind with the sails fully spread and drawing and it was quite a sight with 20+ boats doing tethered death rolls and the shore team hanging on for all they were worth. the 35 foot booms would be skying one moment and then come crashing down onto the boat to leeward and it was a wonder no one got crushed.

The skipper would shoo the remaining crew in his after guard to go board the boat one by one and there was the inevitable crew replacement or 'pier head jumper' trying to get on board. I've seen fisticuffs break out and guys get thrown off of the boat just seconds before the start. The noise and confusion built steadily and then at another unseen signal the skipper would throw down his paper plate of chicken or goat stew and jump in over the transom and the line to the shore would either be released by the shore contingent or more dramatically cut at the boat. This mad version of a Le Mans start somehow come to pass without death or dismemberment and the boats would take off and stabilize once getting some way on. Stabilize being a relative term with those massive rigs and no concept of a balanced sailplan.

 

What I failed to mention in the account above, is that in that last few moments before the start of that particular race, the skipper turned to me and asked me to join them for the race! But that is another story...

 

ctc_01_img0042.jpg

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Pretty much run-what-cha-brung but the best part was the rights of way when crossing close hauled. As two boats approached on port and starboard, there was no concept of 'give way' boat. The skippers (and crews) would start yelling at the approaching competitor "Hard A-Lee! Hard A-Lee!" This was a loosely agreed upon convention that both skippers would head up as the boats came together until they were both equally head to wind at which time the cry would change to "Bump and Go!" at which they would gently bring the gunnels into contact for a split second and then bear away on the new tack. Sort of like playing chicken and when properly done was a sight to see. Of course this resulted in many less than gentle 'bumps' and there was much yelling and accusations as to who hadn't gone fully head to wind and this would continue upon the return to the beach. If not familiar with the bluster which is part of the West Indian culture, a newcomer would think that blood would soon be spilled. But the dings and shattered topside planks were hastily repaired (through the miracle of West System Epoxy) by the next race the following morning and it was business as usual...

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"Ugly island sloop"?

I dunno, maybe I'm missing something, but i'm having a hard time finding the ugly in the boats noted above. yeah, the sail form sucks, but the hull form doesn't, and the boats are doing what they were designed to do... in the caribbean.

Even if they were truly ugly, an ugly boat in a tropical clime is automatically 50% less ugly than a gorgeous boat stuck on the hard when the temp's below freezing and there is still snow on the ground.

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This thread is my favorite.

 

If I may pose a question to our resident architect/designer extrordinaire, Mr Perry.

 

Have you ever put your your pen to paper and had the resulting creation be less then...visually ideal?

 

Willing to share that with the jackels?

 

I guess this would be better asked after a couple rounds on me.

Thanks for your input always enjoy it.

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We've got to get back to ugly boats at some point, but meanwhile the link has a video of a Bahamian anchor start. Good entertainment.

 

Interesting. So how do they decide who gets the port berths? A clear advantage to be had here. Must be some shit fights over that - unless its a ballot, or some kind of handicapping system. A Caribbean Mark Foy maybe? :unsure:

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My hometown is Maine, USA; where Tyvek is a key exterior building material. I've written to DuPont explaining what a missed market opportunity they have, but strangely they ignore me.

 

Do you suppose there is a business opportunity in selling Tyvek printed with a pattern that looks like conventional siding?

 

Oh fer sure....

 

451.jpg

 

Imagine that with a conventional siding printed on it? How many more projects could be considered "completed" if it was?

When they get to the finishing stage do they put the siding on upside down too? :lol:

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We've got to get back to ugly boats at some point, but meanwhile the link has a video of a Bahamian anchor start. Good entertainment.

 

Definitely the chance for mast-to-mast interactions there!

 

There are a lot of comments on sail shape. These boats may be home-brewed, but I doubt there are 100 years behind the times on sail shape. I bet many of these sailors earn a buck or two crewing on yachts in the tourist trade and know all about modern sails. I know that many catboat sailors have had sails cut for them that were too flat. And they are probably not sailing W/L courses. If they have a lot of reaching, a full cut sail may be just the thing.

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Nassau harbor, ya never know what you might see. This is a Haitian boat coming in....

post-36841-0-74660200-1363546408_thumb.jpg

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We've got to get back to ugly boats at some point, but meanwhile the link has a video of a Bahamian anchor start. Good entertainment.

 

Definitely the chance for mast-to-mast interactions there!

 

There are a lot of comments on sail shape. These boats may be home-brewed, but I doubt there are 100 years behind the times on sail shape. I bet many of these sailors earn a buck or two crewing on yachts in the tourist trade and know all about modern sails. I know that many catboat sailors have had sails cut for them that were too flat. And they are probably not sailing W/L courses. If they have a lot of reaching, a full cut sail may be just the thing.

Yes. Maybe you're right here. That's a fair comment.

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Nassau harbor, ya never know what you might see. This is a Haitian boat coming in....

 

Total respect for those Haitian sailors, they would work those loaded engineless boats with great skill from Haiti up to Nassau and back several times a year. Fruit and veg on the way up and all sorts on the way back. Stolen bicycles sometimes piled high on the deck.

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Even more off topic, but since we are heading down this ugly island sloop direction, you guys might appreciate this. They might be ugly, homely, whatever but they are quite functional and you have to admire the circumstances which produced these boats,

 

Great video, 'Rasputin22'. Thanks.

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Nassau harbor, ya never know what you might see. This is a Haitian boat coming in....

 

Total respect for those Haitian sailors, they would work those loaded engineless boats with great skill from Haiti up to Nassau and back several times a year. Fruit and veg on the way up and all sorts on the way back. Stolen bicycles sometimes piled high on the deck.

 

Yes agreed, it was pretty cool to see these guys sailing in through the anchorage at twilight, with no lights, no engine, and the straightest tree they could find for mast and boom.

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There are now almost as many cool boats in this thread than the cool boat thread.

 

Where da ugly boats at?

 

Try this one, 'Elegua'. I'm not particularly fond of multi-hulls (unless they are ETNZ's or ORTUSA's) in any case, but this is a pretty nasty looking one, IMO. Yours for a mere $600,000 apparently!

post-76289-0-39255600-1363666445_thumb.jpg

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There are now almost as many cool boats in this thread than the cool boat thread.

 

Where da ugly boats at?

 

Try this one, 'Elegua'. I'm not particularly fond of multi-hulls (unless they are ETNZ's or ORTUSA's) in any case, but this is a pretty nasty looking one, IMO. Yours for a mere $600,000 apparently!

 

no.

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There are now almost as many cool boats in this thread than the cool boat thread.

 

Where da ugly boats at?

 

Try this one, 'Elegua'. I'm not particularly fond of multi-hulls (unless they are ETNZ's or ORTUSA's) in any case, but this is a pretty nasty looking one, IMO. Yours for a mere $600,000 apparently!

 

That is an obscenity, no doubt.

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My hometown is Maine, USA; where Tyvek is a key exterior building material. I've written to DuPont explaining what a missed market opportunity they have, but strangely they ignore me.

 

Do you suppose there is a business opportunity in selling Tyvek printed with a pattern that looks like conventional siding?

 

Oh fer sure....

 

451.jpg

 

Imagine that with a conventional siding printed on it? How many more projects could be considered "completed" if it was?

When they get to the finishing stage do they put the siding on upside down too? :lol:/>

 

Make it unidirectional for the amateur builder. Or camo....that goes anyway and can be used for hunting stands.... Or hi-viz orange?

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An AMF 21 is rather pedestrian by the Uglyboat standards set in this thread and I don't feel like web optimizing and uploading the photos to display them here, but you have to admire (or shudder at) our procedure for removing it from a Flying Scot trailer and getting it on stands in my driveway... Pics at the link below are public, so you don't need a facebook account to see them.

 

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There you go Tom...

 

I can't get too offended by this boat. It has a Reagan period appeal. I can see you putting a Duran Duran or Starship's `we built this city' cassette on whilst doing the maintenance.

 

Is that about that 80s era?

post-14496-0-59488100-1363730216_thumb.png

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I'm not sure, Tricky. It belongs to the guy who was standing atop my golf cart, who is kind of a hero of mine because he does more for sailing in this area in a day than most do in a month. Next time I'm out in the driveway I can see if there is a legible hull number and if it's recent enough to end in the model year.

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I don't think it's ugly. It's unique but not ugly. There is a certain sparse plainness about it that I find, soothing. Looks like it wouldn't hurt a fly. I wonder if it's fast. That would be fun.

 

Daddy, that boat from the 80's passed us again!

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Dennis says it is faster than its rating and he seldom lost a race in it. I think he is faster than its rating, but he's too modest to say so.

 

I know multihulls are inherently ugly, but this is going some...

 

TGull.jpg

 

More pics from the West Coast Trailer Sailing Squadron weekend that don't necessarily go here but are fun to look at:

 

http://members.ij.net/wctss/wctss/photos101.html

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The hull number on the AMF 21 ends in 80E. I guess that means its a 1980 model. Under the current numbering convention, the last four digits decode to the month and year of manufacture and then the model year and they use letters to indicate the month. So the E on the end could mean it is a 1980 model built in May of that year. Or not.

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The hull number on the AMF 21 ends in 80E. I guess that means its a 1980 model. Under the current numbering convention, the last four digits decode to the month and year of manufacture and then the model year and they use letters to indicate the month. So the E on the end could mean it is a 1980 model built in May of that year. Or not.

 

I'm guessing you are on the money ... by the colour of the striping.

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Dennis says it is faster than its rating and he seldom lost a race in it. I think he is faster than its rating, but he's too modest to say so.

 

I know multihulls are inherently ugly, but this is going some...

 

TGull.jpg

 

More pics from the West Coast Trailer Sailing Squadron weekend that don't necessarily go here but are fun to look at:

 

http://members.ij.ne.../photos101.html

 

One of the Tremolino family, I think. Dick Newick started out using Hobie hulls as amas, then kept modifying. This looks like one of the latter forms with swing wing, half-moon amas. Newick's boats are not in the mainstream for appearance, but many are quite striking. This one suffers from be so small that accommodation to the human form harms the looks.

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There you go Tom...

 

I can't get too offended by this boat. It has a Reagan period appeal. I can see you putting a Duran Duran or Starship's `we built this city' cassette on whilst doing the maintenance.

 

Is that about that 80s era?

 

Not entirely ugly, but not too pretty either, IMO. I'm not liking that flush deck and heightened freeboard, but otherwise the hull form looks OK.

 

Very creative system for lifting her onto the boat stands though. :)

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Dennis says it is faster than its rating and he seldom lost a race in it. I think he is faster than its rating, but he's too modest to say so.

 

I know multihulls are inherently ugly, but this is going some...

 

TGull.jpg

 

More pics from the West Coast Trailer Sailing Squadron weekend that don't necessarily go here but are fun to look at:

 

http://members.ij.ne.../photos101.html

 

One of the Tremolino family, I think. Dick Newick started out using Hobie hulls as amas, then kept modifying. This looks like one of the latter forms with swing wing, half-moon amas. Newick's boats are not in the mainstream for appearance, but many are quite striking. This one suffers from be so small that accommodation to the human form harms the looks.

I'm thinking, 'Jules Verne's, Nautilus' when I look at this tri. The ports even look like big bug eyes. Not quite monster from the deep, but definitely ugly, IMO.

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Dennis says it is faster than its rating and he seldom lost a race in it. I think he is faster than its rating, but he's too modest to say so.

 

I know multihulls are inherently ugly, but this is going some...

 

TGull.jpg

 

More pics from the West Coast Trailer Sailing Squadron weekend that don't necessarily go here but are fun to look at:

 

http://members.ij.ne.../photos101.html

 

One of the Tremolino family, I think. Dick Newick started out using Hobie hulls as amas, then kept modifying. This looks like one of the latter forms with swing wing, half-moon amas. Newick's boats are not in the mainstream for appearance, but many are quite striking. This one suffers from be so small that accommodation to the human form harms the looks.

I'm thinking, 'Jules Verne's, Nautilus' when I look at this tri. The ports even look like big bug eyes. Not quite monster from the deep, but definitely ugly, IMO.

 

Yeah, but it's cute ugly. It's like a little kid in a ghost costume.

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Dennis says it is faster than its rating and he seldom lost a race in it. I think he is faster than its rating, but he's too modest to say so.

 

I know multihulls are inherently ugly, but this is going some...

 

TGull.jpg

 

More pics from the West Coast Trailer Sailing Squadron weekend that don't necessarily go here but are fun to look at:

 

http://members.ij.ne.../photos101.html

 

One of the Tremolino family, I think. Dick Newick started out using Hobie hulls as amas, then kept modifying. This looks like one of the latter forms with swing wing, half-moon amas. Newick's boats are not in the mainstream for appearance, but many are quite striking. This one suffers from be so small that accommodation to the human form harms the looks.

I'm thinking, 'Jules Verne's, Nautilus' when I look at this tri. The ports even look like big bug eyes. Not quite monster from the deep, but definitely ugly, IMO.

 

Yeah, but it's cute ugly. It's like a little kid in a ghost costume.

A helloween trick or treat kind of ugly then, 'Ishmael'? Ha, ha. Yeah, maybe.

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There you go Tom...

 

I can't get too offended by this boat. It has a Reagan period appeal. I can see you putting a Duran Duran or Starship's `we built this city' cassette on whilst doing the maintenance.

 

Is that about that 80s era?

 

Late '70s, nearly the same thing

 

That's an AMF 2100. Relatively fast for it's size & accomodation. IIRC the design was credited to Ted Hood's office. I've always liked those boats

 

FB- Doug

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Olympus-Photo-barca-lui-Mike-Birch-la-plecarea-in-cursa.jpg

 

 

 

Same designer, in the earlier stages of multihull design, and with a huge win, at the line, by 98 seconds.

 

1978 Route Du Rhum M.Birch. http://www.routedurh...orique_1978.php

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Very creative system for lifting her onto the boat stands though. :)

 

You should have heard the creative process underway. The usual procedure is to lower the trailer tongue, put jack stands under the stern, raise the tongue to get the aft end off the back of the trailer, then borrow one of the neighbor's backhoes to lift the bow and slip the trailer out. Except both backhoes are out on jobs right now. Doh!

 

Well, if we get it close enough to that tree, we can put a come-along around a big branch to lift the bow. But we can't get it close enough. Well, if we had a big piece of wood, we could span the two trees and hang the come-along from the wood. But I don't have such a piece of wood. But Dennis has a big metal beam that would work! But his house is 45 minutes away. Wait, I know, I've got a 40' piece of stainless chain that will do it! But no shackles that will work for the job. But I've got some largish bolts that will do! We'll need a ladder to reach high enough on the tree. The golf cart roof will do! Wrap the trees with the chain and bolt it back to itself! But where we wrapped it, the towing eye in the bow is too far back and we don't want to move the boat since the stern is already lifted. How about the stem fitting? Is it strong enough? Maybe, let's try it! But the tiny shackle in the (well-worn) hole in the stem fitting won't fit the come-along hook. OK, another shackle in the shackle, then the hook! If any of us were beer drinkers, someone definitely would have said, "Hold my beer and watch this!!"

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Tom, what you have just described is what we call around here an "ingenuity cascade." Sorta like an event cascade, except wiht a positive outcome. One so-crazy-it-just-might-work idea triggers a series of smaller lightbulb moments.

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Olympus-Photo-barca-lui-Mike-Birch-la-plecarea-in-cursa.jpg

 

 

 

Same designer, in the earlier stages of multihull design, and with a huge win, at the line, by 98 seconds.

 

1978 Route Du Rhum M.Birch. http://www.routedurh...orique_1978.php

 

I never thought of the Dick Newick Tris as ugly. They actually look pretty cool even stiing still.

 

Someone at our club built a 38'er in his backyard years ago and took off on a round the world trio abd are still sailing the boat.

 

 

Blog at: http://ninthcharm.multiply.com/journal

BVI-Christmas-shot-BLOG-CR.jpg?et=QXfGfofPvwchxtGjdXfemg&nmid=243140903

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Olympus-Photo-barca-lui-Mike-Birch-la-plecarea-in-cursa.jpg

 

 

 

Same designer, in the earlier stages of multihull design, and with a huge win, at the line, by 98 seconds.

 

1978 Route Du Rhum M.Birch. http://www.routedurh...orique_1978.php

 

I never thought of the Dick Newick Tris as ugly. They actually look pretty cool even stiing still.

 

Someone at our club built a 38'er in his backyard years ago and took off on a round the world trio abd are still sailing the boat.

 

 

Blog at: http://ninthcharm.multiply.com/journal

BVI-Christmas-shot-BLOG-CR.jpg?et=QXfGfofPvwchxtGjdXfemg&nmid=243140903

 

Actually, I think they have a real sense of style. I like them.

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Olympus-Photo-barca-lui-Mike-Birch-la-plecarea-in-cursa.jpg

 

 

 

Same designer, in the earlier stages of multihull design, and with a huge win, at the line, by 98 seconds.

 

1978 Route Du Rhum M.Birch. http://www.routedurh...orique_1978.php

 

I never thought of the Dick Newick Tris as ugly. They actually look pretty cool even stiing still.

 

Someone at our club built a 38'er in his backyard years ago and took off on a round the world trio abd are still sailing the boat.

 

 

Blog at: http://ninthcharm.multiply.com/journal

BVI-Christmas-shot-BLOG-CR.jpg?et=QXfGfofPvwchxtGjdXfemg&nmid=243140903

 

 

The yellow tri 'Olympus Photo' has often been attributed to noted multihull designer Dick Newick but was actually designed and built by Walter Greene up in Maine. Walter was intimately familiar with the Newick designs having built several of them. Walter is the epitome of the pragmatic Maine boatbuilder in that he was able to get more out of a day or a dollar that anyone. Phil Stegall put it best in this quote,

 

"Both Walter and his wife,

Joan, have contributed greatly to multihull

sailing.

What can you say about Walter?

Guru comes to mind…Walter larger than

life Greene…Walter don’t let him buy the

food for the race Greene…Walter not a

slave to fashion Green...Walter the costeffective

solution Greene…I’ve never

met anybody who could get more out of

a dollar to make a boat go faster than

Walter Greene."

 

The very successful Olympus Photo was actually named 'A Capella' and was on loan from Walter to Mike Birch. Mike skippered it to a narrow victory over the much larger Kriter V in the 78 Route Du Rhum was essentially a stretched version of Newick's Val 31 which had an amazing Ostar as Third Turtle. Walter and Dick were cohorts in the best sense and really put the US on the short and singlehanded offshore scene.

 

There was a remarkably similar to Newick's wing aka trimaran design built in St Croix not long after Dick had left for Martha's Vinyard by a retired Navy Master Carpenter and his son, Wayne Randall. When people complimented them on their beautiful and fast Newick they would get highly irate and make comments like, "Somebody had to invent the wheel!" DIck's boats have an amazing affinity for the ocean and their smoothly flowing hulls and beams just 'fit' the water and waves somehow and the rougher it gets the more they revel in the conditions.

 

In the Cool Boat thread someone posted a beautiful canoe sterned ketch that was a recreation of the old Arion and built by Damien McLaughlin. I was surprised to see such a traditional design named the 'Walter Greene'. Damien had built trimarans by both Dick and Walter and I only hope that this boat built as a tribute to Walter Greene doesn't that he has 'crossed the bar'. Writing this got me to wondering about Walter as 10 years ago when I saw him last he was suffering from Parkinson's. I just got off of the phone with Damien and am glad to report that Walter is still working in his shop but the affliction has taken its toll. The ketch was named after him by the owner of the Newick tri 'Moxie' after Walter managed to help him jury rig and get to the Azores of a Trans-At passage. I can't imagine anyone I'd rather have on board in such circumstances, Walt was truly a 'get 'er done' kind of guy in a Maine North Woods sort of way.

 

l13.jpg

 

Thanks to Ajax News Photo for this image.

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Olympus-Photo-barca-lui-Mike-Birch-la-plecarea-in-cursa.jpg

 

 

 

Same designer, in the earlier stages of multihull design, and with a huge win, at the line, by 98 seconds.

 

1978 Route Du Rhum M.Birch. http://www.routedurh...orique_1978.php

 

I never thought of the Dick Newick Tris as ugly. They actually look pretty cool even stiing still.

 

Someone at our club built a 38'er in his backyard years ago and took off on a round the world trio abd are still sailing the boat.

 

 

Blog at: http://ninthcharm.multiply.com/journal

 

BVI-Christmas-shot-BLOG-CR.jpg?et=QXfGfofPvwchxtGjdXfemg&nmid=243140903

 

It's all good for me until I see that bizarre S shaped sheer line. Woof.

 

Plus, there's something funky going on with the jib luff.

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Tom, what you have just described is what we call around here an "ingenuity cascade." Sorta like an event cascade, except wiht a positive outcome. One so-crazy-it-just-might-work idea triggers a series of smaller lightbulb moments.

+1 :)

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On the trimaran Ninth Charm, the jib is a Bierig Camberspar which is a half wishbone in a large pocket sewn right in the sail. It makes the jib pretty much self vanging so that imparts a kink into the luff which is accounted for and cut and shaped in the sail as well. Looks odd, but works great.

 

Ages ago I had a daytrip booked on my trimaran for a family of three. I told the guy on the phone that I had a four person minimum and suggested that he ask around the campgrounds where he was staying and try and get a couple to join us for the day. He called early the day of the trip and said no luck with that so I told him I would take he and his wife and son anyway and only charge for three. Get the boat ready and he shows up and said the wife had backed out for I was ready to pull the plug. He mentioned that he was building a trimaran and had never been sailing on one and his teenage son reminded me of myself when I was his age. I would have done anything at that age to get out on a trimaran and my Dad had fantacised building a Brown SeaRunner 25.

 

I couldn't say no and the guy agreed to pay for three so off we went while the wife went to get her hair braided by the Rasta ladies or something equally stupid. As we cleared the headland outside the harbor and I hoisted the jib the guy was so excited to be at the helm. I came back to the cockpit and sheeted in as the tradewind gusts came around the point and we took off! I though the Dad was going to wet himself, but the kid was nowhere to be seen. The little punk was down below in my bunk reading some magazines and I tried to get him to come up and share this inaugural sail with his Dad. The mags weren't even girlie mags or anything, windsurfing I think, but the kid was about as enthusiastic as his Mom.

 

Back on deck, I could see the Dad was hooked and asked about his tri build. He said he lived in Montreal and was building an Airex/Epoxy Newick Native! That was a rocketship compared to my venerable Cross 42R and I began to have doubts about his dream of building and sailing such a hot tri as he had no sailing experience. It was depressing to think of how his wife would grow alienated but the project and his kid wouldn't give a shit either and I made a note to stay in touch with him as it might be a good project to step and buy out in a couple of years. Had a great day with the Dad and image my surprise when 10 years later a good looking Newick Native pulls into the anchorage with Montreal as the hailing port and it was the same guy!

 

After a reunion and a bottle of rum shared on his fine build, he filled me in on the story. I was right about the wife and kid. She divorced him within a couple of years and all he got was the unfinished boat and the alimony and child support. He kept the faith and labored on and eventually met a real sailing gal with whom together they completed the boat and sailed away. I raced BVI Spring Regatta with them on the Ninth Charm and they continued onward to circle the globe.

 

I like to feel that that first sail I took him on helped provide a carrot at the end of a long stick to keep the spark and dream alive as he struggled through the challenge of his protracted build.

 

Thanks for the link to their travel blog!

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On the trimaran Ninth Charm, the jib is a Bierig Camberspar which is a half wishbone in a large pocket sewn right in the sail. It makes the jib pretty much self vanging so that imparts a kink into the luff which is accounted for and cut and shaped in the sail as well. Looks odd, but works great.

 

Ages ago I had a daytrip booked on my trimaran for a family of three. I told the guy on the phone that I had a four person minimum and suggested that he ask around the campgrounds where he was staying and try and get a couple to join us for the day. He called early the day of the trip and said no luck with that so I told him I would take he and his wife and son anyway and only charge for three. Get the boat ready and he shows up and said the wife had backed out for I was ready to pull the plug. He mentioned that he was building a trimaran and had never been sailing on one and his teenage son reminded me of myself when I was his age. I would have done anything at that age to get out on a trimaran and my Dad had fantacised building a Brown SeaRunner 25.

 

I couldn't say no and the guy agreed to pay for three so off we went while the wife went to get her hair braided by the Rasta ladies or something equally stupid. As we cleared the headland outside the harbor and I hoisted the jib the guy was so excited to be at the helm. I came back to the cockpit and sheeted in as the tradewind gusts came around the point and we took off! I though the Dad was going to wet himself, but the kid was nowhere to be seen. The little punk was down below in my bunk reading some magazines and I tried to get him to come up and share this inaugural sail with his Dad. The mags weren't even girlie mags or anything, windsurfing I think, but the kid was about as enthusiastic as his Mom.

 

Back on deck, I could see the Dad was hooked and asked about his tri build. He said he lived in Montreal and was building an Airex/Epoxy Newick Native! That was a rocketship compared to my venerable Cross 42R and I began to have doubts about his dream of building and sailing such a hot tri as he had no sailing experience. It was depressing to think of how his wife would grow alienated but the project and his kid wouldn't give a shit either and I made a note to stay in touch with him as it might be a good project to step and buy out in a couple of years. Had a great day with the Dad and image my surprise when 10 years later a good looking Newick Native pulls into the anchorage with Montreal as the hailing port and it was the same guy!

 

After a reunion and a bottle of rum shared on his fine build, he filled me in on the story. I was right about the wife and kid. She divorced him within a couple of years and all he got was the unfinished boat and the alimony and child support. He kept the faith and labored on and eventually met a real sailing gal with whom together they completed the boat and sailed away. I raced BVI Spring Regatta with them on the Ninth Charm and they continued onward to circle the globe.

 

I like to feel that that first sail I took him on helped provide a carrot at the end of a long stick to keep the spark and dream alive as he struggled through the challenge of his protracted build.

 

Thanks for the link to their travel blog!

Great story, 'Rasputin22'. Those sailing loving womenfolk are worth gold - but not readily found in my experience. A nice outcome here though.

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Rasputin

Great story, thanks for sharing. It gave me goose bumps and once again shows how small he world really is.

 

Sailby

Very true re sailing loving women. My last girlfriend hated the boat and drove home the point that sailing was a pre-requisite for me in any relationship. Married now for 20+ years and we can;t wait to get out on the water again each spring!

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There you go Tom...

 

I can't get too offended by this boat. It has a Reagan period appeal. I can see you putting a Duran Duran or Starship's `we built this city' cassette on whilst doing the maintenance.

 

Is that about that 80s era?

 

there is one of those that races on the Potomac. They seem to do pretty well with it... and It isn't anywhere near ugly when sailing, but it does have a look to it that makes you think that someone shrunk a bigger boat in the dryer.

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The girl that helped Ninth Charm get finished and out to sail the world certainly holds her own when it comes for adventuring. I was not sure just what the dynamics were on the boat, but the partnership seems to have worked out pretty well. I've been catching up on their adventures since we raced in the BVI at their journal site. I had forgotten that the boat had the wingmast. I sailed for years on a slightly larger Newick (Raka 40) with the same rig and while the power and drive that the relatively large wing section provides, I'm not sure I'd want to nurse one around the world... As luck would have it, they dropped the rig off of Brazil. When you only have three wires holding up the rig on a design as powerful as that, you had best have a couple sets of the four shackles at the hounds. The big one we always called the 'Jesus Shackle' and you better have faith in it! It has the three individual bow shackles attaching the tops of the two shrouds and the headstay and they all have to have a degree of freedom to let the mast rotate. In the catamaran charter fleets with the same rig, the Coast Guard insists that they get replaced every year at annual inspection. You can send the replaced set into a testing outfit where they can magnaflux them and re-certify a couple of times and your just rotate them out every year. Here is what happens when you don't. Now that is ugly!

 

01-guilty-shackle-SM.jpg?et=miVLj5eTHr3kllE4LTHb2A&nmid=586421366

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Rasputin

Great story, thanks for sharing. It gave me goose bumps and once again shows how small he world really is.

 

Sailby

Very true re sailing loving women. My last girlfriend hated the boat and drove home the point that sailing was a pre-requisite for me in any relationship. Married now for 20+ years and we can;t wait to get out on the water again each spring!

You're a lucky man, 'Py26129'. But you already know that. Good on you both.

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The girl that helped Ninth Charm get finished and out to sail the world certainly holds her own when it comes for adventuring. I was not sure just what the dynamics were on the boat, but the partnership seems to have worked out pretty well. I've been catching up on their adventures since we raced in the BVI at their journal site. I had forgotten that the boat had the wingmast. I sailed for years on a slightly larger Newick (Raka 40) with the same rig and while the power and drive that the relatively large wing section provides, I'm not sure I'd want to nurse one around the world... As luck would have it, they dropped the rig off of Brazil. When you only have three wires holding up the rig on a design as powerful as that, you had best have a couple sets of the four shackles at the hounds. The big one we always called the 'Jesus Shackle' and you better have faith in it! It has the three individual bow shackles attaching the tops of the two shrouds and the headstay and they all have to have a degree of freedom to let the mast rotate. In the catamaran charter fleets with the same rig, the Coast Guard insists that they get replaced every year at annual inspection. You can send the replaced set into a testing outfit where they can magnaflux them and re-certify a couple of times and your just rotate them out every year. Here is what happens when you don't. Now that is ugly!

 

01-guilty-shackle-SM.jpg?et=miVLj5eTHr3kllE4LTHb2A&nmid=586421366

Oh...shit. As you say, R - that IS ugly.

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We always used WIchards for those critical shackles. I wish I had a photo of a Harken padeye that the jib halyard on a 56' wingmasted trimaran used when it broke. Harken stuff is really tough too, forged stainless will deform to an amazing degree before failing. Losing that halyard cost us a Heiniken regatta win and when looking at it I thought that it was a custom piece. The bail had re-aligned itself to the load path of the halyard yet not failed. As this 5,000 lb SWL four hole diamond base padeye was hardware bonded into the West Epoxy/wood mast with long machine screws and no backing plate, washers or bolts, it was a testament to that technique. The top machine screw must have let go first and then the flanking ones sheered. The bottom screw and was in compression and the mounting flange there folded over and broke as the padeye got ripped from the mast. We just went up one size (8,000 SWL) for the next one and it was a simple matter to do in a bosun chair in the anchorage. Imagine the hassle of a comparable repair on an alloy spar.

Here is a shot from Ninth Charms mast repair after the dismasting to show just how third world friendly a epoxy/wood boat is when it comes to do it yourself repairs.

 

012-hole-1-w-inner-patch-SM.jpg?et=Y0uDwzV4%2CTvoYaaI4hlxhg&nmid=586421366

 

And for whoever couldn't appreciate the S-curve in the sheerline of a Newick where it sweeps up at the bow, take a look here and see just how carefully this line and shapes are crafted. You really have to see it in person rushing through the water in utmost grace to understand the genius that Dick had for these boats.

 

Ninth-Charm-without-a-mast...for-now-SM.jpg?et=q7FltsiA1UtfiY%2BHsx9tjw&nmid=586421366

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Tom, what you have just described is what we call around here an "ingenuity cascade." Sorta like an event cascade, except wiht a positive outcome. One so-crazy-it-just-might-work idea triggers a series of smaller lightbulb moments.

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