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Writing from a country that owns a number of second hand submarines, it seems to me that giving such a craft to a drug cartel would be a great way to immediately bankrupt their operation.

Yeah, the boat looks like shit.  But they're smiling, which is the reason to sail......

This is what happens when you wear socks with sandals.

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So.. This lovely yacht is a new addition to a marina close to mine. I guess you have to give the guy some points for effort. Dingy with swim platform, fully enclosed wheelhouse, and worth noting are the two headsails and roller furling main. Unfortunately, an ugly boat is still an ugly boat!

post-74403-0-68141800-1363884133_thumb.jpg

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You mean this one Tom?

 

 

35446_10200173134805117_1041934979_n.jpg

 

 

The word "iconoclast" comes to mind.

 

What would that rig be called?

 

I have a question about this rig. The mast, at least the part that doesn't move, is only about 6 feet high. The top of it (the tapered part) is actually an aluminum baseball bat. The rest of the forward sail rig rotates around the mast.

 

So what is that long pole to which the mainsail is attached called? Is it still part of the mast, or what?

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So what is that long pole to which the mainsail is attached called? Is it still part of the mast, or what?

 

I think it's a yard. The closest well-known rig might be the Solent Lug, but I wouldn't be dogmatic about it.

 

Oh, darn, we missed the chance to put this in the sailing terms thread to see if we could stump Bob.

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Great photo. Great wife. Great friend.

 

But I'd like her better if she'd let me pee over the side.

 

Is it true that 80% of drowned sailors are found with their gullibility to bogus statistics wide open? It's an age old way of blessing the ocean. I believe von Richstoten or whoever he was - Flyer in the Whitbreads - wouldn't have poo in his boat, so they had to dump over the back too. At least that would be democratic to the girls. Except they didn't have any girls of course.

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You mean this one Tom?

 

 

35446_10200173134805117_1041934979_n.jpg

 

 

The word "iconoclast" comes to mind.

 

What would that rig be called?

 

I have a question about this rig. The mast, at least the part that doesn't move, is only about 6 feet high. The top of it (the tapered part) is actually an aluminum baseball bat. The rest of the forward sail rig rotates around the mast.

 

So what is that long pole to which the mainsail is attached called? Is it still part of the mast, or what?

 

I would have called it a 'topmast'. I thought a 'yard' needs to be more or less horizontal.

 

The mizzen is a lateen rig with an unusual 2 (3?) legged mast, but I'm buggered if I can come up with a word to describe that sail in front. I'm not even sure which side is the luff!

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So what is that long pole to which the mainsail is attached called? Is it still part of the mast, or what?

 

I think it's a yard. The closest well-known rig might be the Solent Lug, but I wouldn't be dogmatic about it.

 

Oh, darn, we missed the chance to put this in the sailing terms thread to see if we could stump Bob.

 

I thought about putting it there, but decided terms I don't know are not really terms I don't understand. They're just ones I don't know.

 

I think I'll go with Kirwan's explanation that it's a topmast, even though it's the only one I've ever seen that reaches nearly to the bottom of the main mast, if that smaller thing can be called a main mast. Kirwan, I'd call the front of the sail the luff, and that's the pointy part on his headsail.

 

I love this rig. Completely defies explanation and forces unusual uses of common terms. :D

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The mizzen is a lateen rig with an unusual 2 (3?) legged mast

 

I just looked closer at some of my pictures and it definitely has three legs. The forward one is offset to one side. I would say that reminds me of something Bolger might do, but I already learned that this gentleman does not appreciate all the Bolger comparisons his boats bring. ;)

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IMG_7108.JPG

 

Lots to like in this pic.

BJ, that davit setup is interesting. Any problems? It looks like a good option for my boat as well.

Is it an original Bob design feature?

 

These are the original factory davits and dingy. I don't know if Bob designed the davits. I don't think he designed the dingy (which is a gem by the way).

 

The dingy weighs 158 lbs empty. The davits handle that, plus some extra for oars, gas can, fenders and cruising trash, just fine.

 

We are planning on replacing the dingy with a Portland Pudgy in the next year or so. At that time, I'll have a really cute dingy for sale.

 

The davits will stay, not for offshore use (I doubt I'd want to get pooped with that dingy out there), but for when we are in port, or island hopping.

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Ra Ra Rasputin. Great story.

 

Off topic, I know but forgive me. I had twenty years with my first wife. Not her fault, that she was termagant and bullying. God knows she didn't choose to be like that, and it was always worse being her than being with her. Sailing, like sex, was a single handed activity for many years. Finally divorce and freedom, if the concept of freedom can incorporate being a living annuity, a sort of financial host for a separate organism. But this isn't just a bitch about that sort of thing, for unhappiness is universal, but a celebration of the second Mrs Riverpig.

 

Having picked each other up on Virgin flight 7 over the Atlantic, we had a wonderfully romantic if brief courtship and quickly became a permanent couple: people assumed we had been childhood sweethearts, so well do we mesh. Sailing, however, was still a single handed activity at this stage, and it was clear that we needed to buy a boat. "I can't buy a yacht, I'm in the middle of a divorce". "Well I'm not, and I can". So she bought us our first boat. Only six years ago, hard to believe. Here she is at the helm of the current one, rushing up the Needles Channel in the dusk.

 

post-38-0-75467300-1363861241_thumb.jpg

 

I feel very sorry for those asymmetric couples. Hooray for girls who sail!

 

I was with my first wife from 1979 until 2009. Thirty years, two kids, and no love of sailing on her end. She indulged me from time to time but, when it came down to it, being on my San Juan scared her, especially when we were pointing. Maybe she thought the boat would fall over. Much of her life was ruled by fear. That wasn't her fault. It just what it was. Thoughts of living on a boat, much less traveling anywhere, were completely out of the question.

 

We parted ways in 2009 and I fell in love with Kerry. She was a princess for sure. She didn't like camping, called a walk in the woods on level dry ground "hiking", and generally liked to be pampered. She is an artist, actor, dancer, director and choreographer. Again, by her own admission, a princess (but in a good way).

 

And she took the leap with me. We bought Brigadoon in October of 2010, just a year and a bit into our marriage. She was excited to live aboard with me. We will escape into the world, of your plans stay true.

 

Here she is, driving Brigadoon around Vashon.

 

IMG_7108.JPG

 

The look on her face, when I look at this photo, that's all I see. It says to me "I have to think about what I'm doing, (the eyes) but this is kind of fun / rewarding (the smile). the boat heeling has no concern at all. rugged up and having a good time!

 

My wife still gets worried about the whole boat falling over thing, 1/2 the problem I admit its that I don't accept it as a real fear to have while sailing. I've got a 3300 kg boat with 1800 kg of ballast, how exactly can that fall over? "Dear, could you please stop hanging on for dear life and find something worth while to worry about."

She makes me tired watching her hang on, "go sit on the down hill side, please, your making me tired watching you".

Ahh, she loves the boat as a caravan, And I love her.

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Donn:

I thought we put the boat "falling over" thing to rest during that race. We dd have her tipped on her ear and nobody perished. We drove the boat about as hard as you could drive it.

 

No, I didn't complain when I used the composting head. It was an experience. You said to pee in the bottle. I wasn't sure which bottle you meant so I used the one marked "shampoo". Was that ok?

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Donn:

I thought we put the boat "falling over" thing to rest during that race. We dd have her tipped on her ear and nobody perished. We drove the boat about as hard as you could drive it.

 

No, I didn't complain when I used the composting head. It was an experience. You said to pee in the bottle. I wasn't sure which bottle you meant so I used the one marked "shampoo". Was that ok?

 

No Bob, You were supposed to use the bottle marked 'Sunscreen'.

 

Wait, that can't be right, you were in the PNW. That is a Caribbean joke.

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Donn:

I thought we put the boat "falling over" thing to rest during that race. We dd have her tipped on her ear and nobody perished. We drove the boat about as hard as you could drive it.

 

No, I didn't complain when I used the composting head. It was an experience. You said to pee in the bottle. I wasn't sure which bottle you meant so I used the one marked "shampoo". Was that ok?

 

No Bob, You were supposed to use the bottle marked 'Sunscreen'.

 

Wait, that can't be right, you were in the PNW. That is a Caribbean joke.

 

You do realize you are spot on beyond imagining. It snowed last night, north of Seattle. As I came into work this morning, in downtown the "srain" was bouncing.

 

This is on the 22nd of March no less.

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Donn:

I thought we put the boat "falling over" thing to rest during that race. We dd have her tipped on her ear and nobody perished. We drove the boat about as hard as you could drive it.

 

 

 

Kerry does really well with Brigadoon heeling. She didn't know squat about sailing when we started this but, in that picture, she is watching the main, learning to drive by watching the sail. She's doing a great job.

 

During Race Your House, we did indeed put Brigadoon on her ear. We were pointing in 25kts with an occasional gust to 30. Water was coursing over the port rail while we were dancing around 7kts. It was great fun.

 

Kerry did great while Bob and Tricky turned Brigadoon into a raceboat. It was like taking a Clydesdale barrel racing. She did have a bit of stress when boats got close but learned that we were unlikely to bash into anyone (the reason she really doesn't want to race our house on a regular basis).

 

At one point though, as Kerry was sitting in the pilot house, navigating, Bob casually mentioned, "Don't tell Kerry about that boat."

 

"What boat?" was her response as her head swiveled around.

 

A 45 foot Hallberg Rassy was charging right at the pilot house from the port side. She "eeked" a little and, true to Bob's driving, passed safely about 15-20' behind us. It was great fun.

 

By the way, we beat that boat to the finish line.

 

 

 

No, I didn't complain when I used the composting head. It was an experience. You said to pee in the bottle. I wasn't sure which bottle you meant so I used the one marked "shampoo". Was that ok?

 

Hey. Wait a minnit...

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Yeah Donn but look at that sheen!

 

It's snowing like crazy here at the shack. My wife left to go on a ski weekend and I am home with the dogs. Ruby loves the snow and Freda hates it. I was planning on driving to the store and buying something special for my dinner. Now I'l have to dive into the freezer and pull out that steak I put in there in 2008. I'll BBQ it to a crisp, pour a can of chili over it and eat like a king.

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Yeah Donn but look at that sheen!

 

Thank god I don't use shampoo!

 

 

It's snowing like crazy here at the shack. My wife left to go on a ski weekend and I am home with the dogs. Ruby loves the snow and Freda hates it. I was planning on driving to the store and buying something special for my dinner. Now I'l have to dive into the freezer and pull out that steak I put in there in 2008. I'll BBQ it to a crisp, pour a can of chili over it and eat like a king.

 

Sounds like an awesome dinner!

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You do realize you are spot on beyond imagining. It snowed last night, north of Seattle. As I came into work this morning, in downtown the "srain" was bouncing.

 

This is on the 22nd of March no less.

 

'Round these parts what you called "srain", we call "graupel". Like little styrofoam pellets that bounce.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graupel - bad stuff that can lead to avalanches.

 

Probably way more than anyone wanted to know.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Had a nice sail yesterday with my wife in our cute-but-slow little catboat. Sailors were out in pretty large numbers, at least for our area. At one point I counted 20 sails around us, and I'm pretty sure I missed some.

 

I still found a couple of people to pick on in this thread, starting with this ketch. That cabin trunk just looks wrong somehow. Also, that was the only sailboat I saw with no sails up. He was at that time heading up the harbor and winds were about 12 knots and pretty steady in a very favorable direction for going up the harbor. Why anyone would motor is beyond me.

 

ugly-ketch-motoring.jpg

 

Then there was this catamaran. Again the house looks funny. He's sailing upwind with only the jib and has one of those fancy stack pack things.

 

Sorry 'bout the grainy photo. iPhone from about a mile away.

 

ugly-catamaran.jpg

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Grace-less.

 

post-5724-0-91113500-1364830540_thumb.jpg

 

That's one strange looking boat. Wish we could see the whole rig. Judging by the spreaders, that mizzen must be big.

 

That's a nice dinghy spot, though the sacrifices required to put it there look significant. It does fit with my idea that a cruising boat is a way to get people and small boats to interesting places. Better if the small boats are nice ones!

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Grace-less.

 

post-5724-0-91113500-1364830540_thumb.jpg

 

You are right Semi, the white and white and white look along with the odd spaced hull ports renders the boat graceless when a little effort could have produced a more harmonious result. Long skinny boats are easier to make pretty but this one just wants to look purposeful without grace.

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Great Red:

I don't have much of a problem with the boats, other than the fact that they are well beyond the means of most cruising couples.

My problem is with Dashew's, "You gotta have this to go offshore" attitude. No fucking shit. We all need 70' offshore cruising boats.

Do you know what moorage for a 70'er costs in Seattle?

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Great Red:

I don't have much of a problem with the boats, other than the fact that they are well beyond the means of most cruising couples.

My problem is with Dashew's, "You gotta have this to go offshore" attitude. No fucking shit. We all need 70' offshore cruising boats.

Do you know what moorage for a 70'er costs in Seattle?

 

Twice what I'm currently paying???? Yikes!

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Great Red:

I don't have much of a problem with the boats, other than the fact that they are well beyond the means of most cruising couples.

My problem is with Dashew's, "You gotta have this to go offshore" attitude. No fucking shit. We all need 70' offshore cruising boats.

Do you know what moorage for a 70'er costs in Seattle?

 

Twice what I'm currently paying???? Yikes!

 

Don't forget the beam factor. My 35 is currently $4300 + tax, a 70 would be $11000 plus tax, if they had room. Double yikes.

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Yep. The reality is, for most of us, that even if we were given a newish 70 footer in good condition, we wouldn't be able to afford to keep it anyway. Happiness is the boat you have.

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Weyalan:

I couldn't afford a haul out let alone the bottom paint for a 70'er. Imagine what new jib sheets cost.

Dashew is an idiot. I have talked to him at length. He knows nothing about yacht design.. He once told me that 6 degrees of of weather helm was good.

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Weyalan:

I couldn't afford a haul out let alone the bottom paint for a 70'er. Imagine what new jib sheets cost.

Dashew is an idiot. I have talked to him at length. He knows nothing about yacht design.. He once told me that 6 degrees of of weather helm was good.

6 degrees of helm to weather is great (but only if you are making a slow turn to leeward) haha

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But he's definitely a good marketer. Look at how many books and boats cost.

 

I bought his weather book. It had a lot of good information, but it was also an infomercial for his sailing prowess.

 

I am highly amused his boat ended up in the ugly thread..... :D

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Weyalan:

I couldn't afford a haul out let alone the bottom paint for a 70'er. Imagine what new jib sheets cost.

Dashew is an idiot. I have talked to him at length. He knows nothing about yacht design.. He once told me that 6 degrees of of weather helm was good.

I've always thought a bit of weather helm to be a good feel under tiller. But just a little, especially upwind. It's not hard to 'balance' a boat with good sail trim in any case, but too much helm, either way, just adds drag surely?

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For the term-confused, we are talking about the angle of deflection of the rudder from center, right?

 

As I understand it, "weather helm" means two things ... they generally happen together but not always... one is a boat's need for slight rudder angle to hold the bow away from the wind, the other is the sensation the of the helm pulling.

 

The way different boats steer, it's really like they have personalities. Nobody really likes a "dead fish" helm but it's generally the fastest. Also nobody really likes a wrestling match, but a good boat should definitely warn you when she is about to spin head-to-wind.

 

FB- Doug

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Weyalan:

I couldn't afford a haul out let alone the bottom paint for a 70'er. Imagine what new jib sheets cost.

Dashew is an idiot. I have talked to him at length. He knows nothing about yacht design.. He once told me that 6 degrees of of weather helm was good.

 

6 degrees of flow separation??? :rolleyes:

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For me, weather helm is the angle of the rudder, period. I'd use heavy or light helm to describe the steering effort, or just call it steering effort. My boat has a bit of weather helm but almost zero helm effort- some people find that strange.

 

It is a beautiful cassette rudder designed by Ian Farrier. There are adjusting bolts in the cassette that change the rudder position slightly and I have it set for very little effort. The weather helm results from sail and foil balance. I'll skip my rant about "leeway" here, but my boat does not have any of it <_< I sail at a slight angle of attack. Everything I've read about drag suggests that in the end a small angle of attack for the hull has a positive lift/drag benefit, and a slight bit of weather helm does so as well.

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For me, weather helm is the angle of the rudder, period. I'd use heavy or light helm to describe the steering effort, or just call it steering effort. My boat has a bit of weather helm but almost zero helm effort- some people find that strange.

 

It is a beautiful cassette rudder designed by Ian Farrier. There are adjusting bolts in the cassette that change the rudder position slightly and I have it set for very little effort. The weather helm results from sail and foil balance. I'll skip my rant about "leeway" here, but my boat does not have any of it <_</> I sail at a slight angle of attack. Everything I've read about drag suggests that in the end a small angle of attack for the hull has a positive lift/drag benefit, and a slight bit of weather helm does so as well.

 

Well, of course it goes wihout saying that multihulls are superior in all respects...

:wacko:/>

 

Now that that's out of the way... there is a big difference between steering effort and how the helm pulls (or doesn't) as the boat heels, yaws, or otherwise. Perhaps feedback is a better term. However, I've sailed with a lot of people who described "weather helm" as needing to pull the tiller as the boat powered up / heeled; when in fact the rudder angle didn't change or was very slight.

 

If hulls had a better lift/drag ratio for resisting leeway, the America's Cup boats would have bigger hulls and no foils under them. QED

 

The only reason not to have a gybing board (centerboard / daggerboard / whatever) is that it's complex & expensive to do so, and a very good case is made that the high-performance vessels which benefit most from them, gain more by having the sailors concetrate more on sail & weight trim instead of being distracted by finicky adjustment of 0.01 degree on the underwater foil.

 

Do boats benefit in windward performance from having a slight rudder angle? The traditional answer is yes, I think so too, but it's easy to overdo it. 6 degrees would be much too much IMHO

 

FB- Doug

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There's a possible downside to a balanced rudder I hadn't realized. I sold my boat to a guy who liked to sail in big air. He was out one day in the remnants of a hurricane, and snapped the rudder off. We didn't talk much about it but I gathered that while there was a lot of "weather helm" due to sailing angle, full main up and little jib, etc, the rudder was so nicely balanced that there was no force input required to have so much helm. He got no feedback that the rudder was over-stressed.

 

 

Now, the rudder shouldn't have broken anyway, it should be able to handle the force of being at 90 degrees to the water flow at the highest speed ever anticipated, with a safety factor, but not all rudders are that strong I guess.

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Ocam:

Maybe in adding balance area to the rudder he increased the rudder overall area and in doing that increased the loads. Still, I agree with you, there should have been enough of a safety factor to prevent the modified rudder from breaking.

Can't recall a time when I felt a a rudder was not being "overstressed" even with balance area. I'll have to think about that a while.

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it's always possible he had feedback, but forgot it given the events that occurred right after the rudder broke….

 

He mentioned the round up was so violent that he thought the boat was going to flip over backwards (a 34' trimaran)

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Weyalan:

I couldn't afford a haul out let alone the bottom paint for a 70'er. Imagine what new jib sheets cost.

Dashew is an idiot. I have talked to him at length. He knows nothing about yacht design.. He once told me that 6 degrees of of weather helm was good.

 

Bob, I reckon most of us know what weather helm is, but what is the measurement? ie, what does "6 degrees of weather helm" really mean? just curious, not contesting,,,,,,

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I would take that as 6 degrees of constant rudder correction at a minimum, so that with increasing heel the rudder would need to move even more. I believe 2-3 degrees is considered healthy and beneficial to good windward performance.

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Ish is right, again. I can talk about this tomorrow. I am still recovering from yesterday.

 

BJ:

That poor little hooker isn't ugly. It's just awkward. I look beyond the skin and see a boat that could be loved. Poor little thing.

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picnic018.jpg

 

picnic3.jpg

 

http://www.rvharvey.com/picnic.htm

 

It can be yours for $2700 american dollars!

 

 

 

 

http://seattle.craig...3719873170.html

 

 

My reaction to the first picture was that it's really not such an ugly little powerboat, then I saw the second pic. Masts on powerboats. Still not a great idea to me.

 

But I was very amused by this from your first link:

 

Another owner in the Chicago area said his Picnic gets up on a plane using a 20hp outboard. Some Picnics were delivered with a small Berkeley jet-pump. According to Stan Spitzer, it was driven by a Briggs & Stratton typically used on lawnmowers.

 

 

picnic_scuber04.jpg

 

If you removed the mast, put in a nice, big Rotax engine and a decent sized jet pump, it would be a cool little jet boat. If you think jet boats can be cool. I do. The jet boat we used to have was the second most fun powerboat I have ever driven.

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My reaction to the first picture was that it's really not such an ugly little powerboat, then I saw the second pic.

 

I rather like the reverse sheer. In fact, it didn't offend me deeply until I saw the underbody,

 

The picture does illustrate a couple things, especially that cheap fiberglass construction is almost always ugly. Also that reverse sheer calls for a reverse rake in the transom. In the Picnic, I'm sure the transom was just an ordinary powerboat thing, but it's ugly. The flare of the topsides aft seems really out of place, but mini-hiking racks could be useful to a boat with little or no ballast.

 

I'm reminded of the Rhodes Continental 22 which also has some flare in the topsides. I never thought it was an attractive boat, but it stayed in production with various builders for quite a while. I always wondered what Mr. Rhodes thought of it.

 

05190017.jpg

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...The flare of the topsides aft seems really out of place, but mini-hiking racks could be useful to a boat with little or no ballast.

 

Not to mention little or no other places to sit.

 

picnicrudder2.jpg

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Ish is right, again. I can talk about this tomorrow. I am still recovering from yesterday.

 

BJ:

That poor little hooker isn't ugly. It's just awkward. I look beyond the skin and see a boat that could be loved. Poor little thing.

 

I wasn't sure if it was truly ugly or not. I mean, the bar was raised pretty high here in the past. I do know it belongs here, in this discussion, at least.

 

You do have a point. Not all boats are pretty, but sometimes we can love them anyway. Case in point: my old goldenrod San Juan 21.

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Not really all that ugly by the standards set in this thread, but goes here because my objection to masts on powerboats extends to half-masts on sailboats...

 

stubby-little-mast.jpg

 

Sorry about the long-distance iPhone shot and resulting crappy picture. The apology goes for this boat too. It's not really ugly either, but it seems to have a yard for a square sail or something. It's not a cutter. That lower roller furling jib belongs to the boat behind it, but both boat and mast are obscured by the subject boat.

 

squarerigger-in-srq.jpg

 

Why?

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Not really all that ugly by the standards set in this thread, but goes here because my objection to masts on powerboats extends to half-masts on sailboats...

 

stubby-little-mast.jpg

 

Sorry about the long-distance iPhone shot and resulting crappy picture. The apology goes for this boat too. It's not really ugly either, but it seems to have a yard for a square sail or something. It's not a cutter. That lower roller furling jib belongs to the boat behind it, but both boat and mast are obscured by the subject boat.

 

squarerigger-in-srq.jpg

 

Why?

Because some people dream of sailing a 'ship'. (and lot's of em don't like spinnakers!) I 'get it' but wouldn't 'do it'...

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It's not really ugly either, but it seems to have a yard for a square sail or something. It's not a cutter. That lower roller furling jib belongs to the boat behind it, but both boat and mast are obscured by the subject boat.

 

squarerigger-in-srq.jpg

 

 

It looks like there is a roller-furling staysail that's sheeted to the head of the mizzen mast. I don't see that drawing well.

 

If that is a yard for a squaresail, I don't see how it interacts with the roller furling headsail. It would interfere with any sail with more minimum overlap.

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I had not even noticed that staysail sheeted to the mizzen masthead, but I think you're right.

 

The square sail, and I'm pretty sure that's what it is, is just a puzzle, but I think Veeger has it right. It's there because. No other reason, certainly not one related to performance, just because.

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I think he wanted ratlines. Maybe he had visions of eyepatches dancing in his head. So he put them on. Then he needed some reason to climb the ratlines so he added the yard.

Ha, ha. I think you're right, Bob. Maybe he's been reading too much O'Brian, Stockwin, Kent or Pope! Not forgetting Forrester of course. But at least he's on the water and that probably suits him just fine. :)

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Ya know.... I think we'd all love to live the life.... Breakfast in my full size aft cabin with all the nifty windows viewing the wake and then stepping up on the quarterdeck to the cry of "Sail Ho!"

 

Bob, we will need that put into a nice, tidy little vessel about 30' loa and budgeted for about $50k max...

 

 

 

 

NO???

 

Hmmm, how about 35' loa......?

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You know, I finally had a candidate for the thread, but I didn't have the heart.

 

Imagine someone took a nice little West Wight Potter. Really, thats what they started with. New owner says PT added 200 pounds of concrete ballast to get her to float nose down, so when the owner got it, it would level out. Then paint it all over in contrasting brown house paint. Latex from what I could tell, remove the rig and replace with a non-tapered alumn tube, painted brown of course, and now un-stayed, so you can put a tanbark (brown) junk rigged sail with real wood battens. Remove all running rigging and replace with traditional hemp. Fancy up your blocks by putting wooden cheeks on them. Remove any hatches and replace with wooden hatches, using firehose as hinges. While you're at it, take little pieces of firehose and tack it down wherever they may be any chafe, paint the firehose brown...

 

Add galvanized horn cleats all over the boat, for no apparent reason - and don't forget to paint them brown...

 

Oh, and too add insult to injury, use camo tarps for your mainsail cover. (Is a junk rigged main, still a main?)

 

And just to add more insult to injury, decide to launch and store in the water, but don't add any antifouling.

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You know, I finally had a candidate for the thread, but I didn't have the heart.

 

Imagine someone took a nice little West Wight Potter. Really, thats what they started with. New owner says PT added 200 pounds of concrete ballast to get her to float nose down, so when the owner got it, it would level out. Then paint it all over in contrasting brown house paint. Latex from what I could tell, remove the rig and replace with a non-tapered alumn tube, painted brown of course, and now un-stayed, so you can put a tanbark (brown) junk rigged sail with real wood battens. Remove all running rigging and replace with traditional hemp. Fancy up your blocks by putting wooden cheeks on them. Remove any hatches and replace with wooden hatches, using firehose as hinges. While you're at it, take little pieces of firehose and tack it down wherever they may be any chafe, paint the firehose brown...

 

Add galvanized horn cleats all over the boat, for no apparent reason - and don't forget to paint them brown...

 

Oh, and too add insult to injury, use camo tarps for your mainsail cover. (Is a junk rigged main, still a main?)

 

And just to add more insult to injury, decide to launch and store in the water, but don't add any antifouling.

 

Oh...come on, Razor. Now that's the biggest tease yet. We DEFINITELY need to see a pic of that boat!

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You know, I finally had a candidate for the thread, but I didn't have the heart.

 

Imagine someone took a nice little West Wight Potter. Really, thats what they started with. New owner says PT added 200 pounds of concrete ballast to get her to float nose down, so when the owner got it, it would level out. Then paint it all over in contrasting brown house paint. Latex from what I could tell, remove the rig and replace with a non-tapered alumn tube, painted brown of course, and now un-stayed, so you can put a tanbark (brown) junk rigged sail with real wood battens. Remove all running rigging and replace with traditional hemp. Fancy up your blocks by putting wooden cheeks on them. Remove any hatches and replace with wooden hatches, using firehose as hinges. While you're at it, take little pieces of firehose and tack it down wherever they may be any chafe, paint the firehose brown...

 

Add galvanized horn cleats all over the boat, for no apparent reason - and don't forget to paint them brown...

 

Oh, and too add insult to injury, use camo tarps for your mainsail cover. (Is a junk rigged main, still a main?)

 

And just to add more insult to injury, decide to launch and store in the water, but don't add any antifouling.

 

Oh...come on, Razor. Now that's the biggest tease yet. We DEFINITELY need to see a pic of that boat!

+1

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Yep - you got it.

 

Problem is, the guy I was helping out owns that "other" site, and he's not going to take a photo and send over it over here, and I don't get over there too often….

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While we're waiting for Razor to take a pic, here is one to tide us all over. S2 8.0 Center Cockpit. The broker described it as "beautiful"

blueox1127-1325019653-d_pic.jpg

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While we're waiting for Razor to take a pic, here is one to tide us all over. S2 8.0 Center Cockpit. The broker described it as "beautiful"

blueox1127-1325019653-d_pic.jpg

 

Did the back fall off?

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While we're waiting for Razor to take a pic, here is one to tide us all over. S2 8.0 Center Cockpit. The broker described it as "beautiful"

blueox1127-1325019653-d_pic.jpg

 

"The broker described it as beautiful"?

 

Please don't tell me you went to look at it! ;)

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While we're waiting for Razor to take a pic, here is one to tide us all over. S2 8.0 Center Cockpit. The broker described it as "beautiful"

blueox1127-1325019653-d_pic.jpg

 

"The broker described it as beautiful"?

 

Please don't tell me you went to look at it! ;)

If I had looked at it, I'd have posted the pic in the Cool boats thread. :D

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While we're waiting for Razor to take a pic, here is one to tide us all over. S2 8.0 Center Cockpit. The broker described it as "beautiful"

blueox1127-1325019653-d_pic.jpg

 

"The broker described it as beautiful"?

 

Please don't tell me you went to look at it! ;)

If I had looked at it, I'd have posted the pic in the Cool boats thread. :D

Ha, that's funny! ... Social suicide!!

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While we're waiting for Razor to take a pic, here is one to tide us all over. S2 8.0 Center Cockpit. The broker described it as "beautiful"

blueox1127-1325019653-d_pic.jpg

No. Beautiful she isn't. But that lawn looks very attractive, lush and well maintained.

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I went to the S2 factory. I was designing a new boat for them, 28' center cockpit as I recall. I still have the drawings and it looks pretty good. If a 28' cc can look good.

What puzzles me is that a company that built some very attractive powerboats could build this little suppository of a boat.

I mean, at some point during the building of the plugs someone or some group of guys had to have stepped back and said, "Oh yeah, that looks good."

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Well, I see no skeg, so there is that to admire about it, I guess.

It looks *very* well cared-for and maintained. Somebody loved that boat. I admire that.

True, or he had the sense to clean it up before the broker came to take pictures, which I also admire.

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While we're waiting for Razor to take a pic, here is one to tide us all over. S2 8.0 Center Cockpit. The broker described it as "beautiful"

blueox1127-1325019653-d_pic.jpg

 

"The broker described it as beautiful"?

 

Please don't tell me you went to look at it! ;)

If I had looked at it, I'd have posted the pic in the Cool boats thread. :D

Ha, that's funny! ... Social suicide!!

Reminds me of the joke that the only thing that "goes" with Crocs footwear is "social ostracism".

 

I sailed an S2 9.2 A once, wasn't awful, but those small CC boats they made sure have a 'look' don't they ? and not a good one.

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Hey! I resemble that remark!fashiontrainwreck.jpg

Is there a problem with my attire or something?

Crocs!!! Someone's not afraid of via little ostracism. Now where did I put my bright yellow ones?
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