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Yeah, the boat looks like shit.  But they're smiling, which is the reason to sail......

Writing from a country that owns a number of second hand submarines, it seems to me that giving such a craft to a drug cartel would be a great way to immediately bankrupt their operation.

No trailer, no problem.  Just drill through the bilge keels and slide the axle right in. A couple of fittings from Harbor Freight and your off to the scrap yard!

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Planned obsolescence as the mechanicals fail. You can sell the next model.

Fair weather day sailor best suited for a dock. Well that's market research.

No rudder? Centerboard?

Docking cleats are on the extendable transom. Must have interesting engineering.

Dry weight 3000 pounds for about 23 feet. Not crazy heavy.

29 foot mast, decent rig aside from the missing traveler and winches.

The mainsheet attaches to the windward hull. Tacking must be an experience.

I like the trailer light extensions. I would feel safer with those.

 

I really want to see one. I want to sail one, and next to one. I do not want one. And I own a quirky boat.

That is UGLY.

 

http://nuvayachts.com/en/press/ More photos.

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IMG_0474_zpsy3cw2tcl.jpg

 

IMG_0473_zpsthsrsfkd.jpg

 

I admire the determination to waste such a nice rig because you mostly want a center console but you'd also like to have a small sailboat and can't decide.

 

 

People who "mostly want a center console" are going to be sorely disappointed because masts tend to ruin motorboats.

 

Recommended Power: 70 hp | Cruising speed (on motor): 14 knots

 

14 knots wallowing and pounding is not how powerboating has to be and powerboaters know this.

 

The cruising speed of 14 knots is one of the serious problems we are currently trying to overcome with the Cowmaran project. The next boat will have a loaded cruising speed of 20 knots. Achieving that with minimal power turns out to be very hard. One of the things you can't do is put a fucking mast.

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...

The mainsheet attaches to the windward hull. Tacking must be an experience.

...

 

The post I just quoted shows the main sheet going down toward centerline. Maybe it has three attachment points so you can get it out of the cockpit when going downwind?

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Kinda like a primitive traveller? ;-)

 

Seriously, it outboard attachment points are very nice when you;re at anchor or at the dock allowing one to move the main sheet over to the side and out of the way. We used to do this with our previous boat that had a traveller running across the cockpit just aft of the companionway.

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...

The mainsheet attaches to the windward hull. Tacking must be an experience.

...

 

 

The post I just quoted shows the main sheet going down toward centerline. Maybe it has three attachment points so you can get it out of the cockpit when going downwind?

Maybe. Otherwise it would seem to put a huge stress on that unsupported hull in the bikini photo. The mainsheet is only 2:1. Nobody in that photo has Popeye arms to handle the sheets anyway.

 

They hide a daggerboard with a weed catching bulb in the center console, a graphic in the press section shows it. I think there is a swing rudder that pivots FORWARD below the water line? or is removed before loading? Thin water would not be this trailerables friend.

post-120910-0-75491000-1476420559_thumb.jpg

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Lots of pictures of A with a sail up on Facebook today.

 

I've found little to admire about A but have to say this bow shot is striking. If only you could find a way to avoid viewing the boat from any other angle.

 

14641916_1219540748103962_79279553265043

Thank you for finding another ugly. I'd hate to see that fucker heading toward me in a calm. At least if it was foggy I wouldn't suffer as much.

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Lots of pictures of A with a sail up on Facebook today.

 

I've found little to admire about A but have to say this bow shot is striking. If only you could find a way to avoid viewing the boat from any other angle.

14641916_1219540748103962_79279553265043

Thank you for finding another ugly. I'd hate to see that fucker heading toward me in a calm. At least if it was foggy I wouldn't suffer as much.

Does that thing have stealth anchor hatches, or does he fling them over the side like a trailer-sailer?

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muscadet%2B7.jpg

 

I've always had a thing for the Muscadet. Love the utility and the insane rigging setups the Frenchmen do.

This one doesn't belong here. Love me some hard chines and reverse sheer! Only thing I don't admire is the color scheme for the stripes, but I've got a some tape and a brush.

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I would build one if there was a fleet to race against

 

At the moment, the Muscadet are the biggest one design fleet in Brittany. It is the only boat that let you do some family cruising, teach your kids how to navigate, do a championship with 80+ boats on the start line and do some semi offshore singlehanded racing. I think that people love them, because it is the antithesis of what big yards offer. It is all about the sailing and being on the water.

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Looks perfect to me. Interesting wave around that keel root.

 

Please elaborate, Bob. What do you see happening that I'm probably missing?

 

 

The keel creates a ugly wave but you are not supposed to sail a muscadet on its ear like this. The guy his on his own and visibly he is altering course, give him a break ;-)

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muscadet%2B7.jpg

 

I've always had a thing for the Muscadet. Love the utility and the insane rigging setups the Frenchmen do.

It's cute and likely fun. I like the paint too.

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s-l1600.jpg

 

s-l1600.jpg

 

I've got a new candidate for membership. A little steel boat called Shuffle, with stainless steel "topsides" (I think they may mean deck), underwater lines drawn by a drunk, and a fabulously ill-proportioned steel dog house. She's been back and forth across the Atlantic several times. I admire her unambiguously.

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s-l1600.jpg

 

s-l1600.jpg

 

I've got a new candidate for membership. A little steel boat called Shuffle, with stainless steel "topsides" (I think they may mean deck), underwater lines drawn by a drunk, and a fabulously ill-proportioned steel dog house. She's been back and forth across the Atlantic several times. I admire her unambiguously.

Is that because she was denied entry wherever she landed?

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s-l1600.jpg

 

s-l1600.jpg

 

I've got a new candidate for membership. A little steel boat called Shuffle, with stainless steel "topsides" (I think they may mean deck), underwater lines drawn by a drunk, and a fabulously ill-proportioned steel dog house. She's been back and forth across the Atlantic several times. I admire her unambiguously.

 

I admire the Naugahydetm mainsail cover.

 

FB- Doug

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I admire not only the stands using old wheels, and that the viewing dome is above the heads - proving that's where we do our best thinking - but also that she's probably sailed more miles than all the boats around her in that first picture.

 

"Tom Vernon entered Shuffle in the very first ARC Atlantic

crossing race in 1986 and was the only participant to complete the race without
any form of engine. At the time he used only a sculling oar for manoeuvring.

Shuffle changed hands in 1988 to a friend of Tom’s, Guy
Spencer who then went on to enter in the ARC again only this time as a solo
yachtsman and although came last due to some difficulties won the acclaim of
his fellow competitors.

$_57.JPG?set_id=880000500F

There are some interesting copies of newspaper reports about
Shuffle and her Atlantic crossings along with some original design plans of
when she was built.

The last owner has looked after Shuffle for the last 20
years and she has been well maintained mechanically with the addition of a
Volvo Penta MD2B diesel engine and various additional touches which make
‘Shuffle’ a unique and quirky little yacht that you can’t help falling in love
with."

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The quest for headroom claims another victim, this time a Bolger Micro.

 

The owner reports on Pocket Yachts and Trailer Sailers on FB that he built the boat in 2010 and has enjoyed several cruises and short outings, so I admire that.

 

But the castle is pretty darn ugly.

 

bolger-micro-castle.jpg

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Agreed, that house is pretty ugly. But it's not as if Bolger himself didn't design a box-like house from time to time:

 

45132548_1ca9f27c55_o.jpg

 

 

Pretty sure this one is longer than what Bolger designed, but his was high and square.

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The quest for headroom claims another victim, this time a Bolger Micro.

 

The owner reports on Pocket Yachts and Trailer Sailers on FB that he built the boat in 2010 and has enjoyed several cruises and short outings, so I admire that.

 

But the castle is pretty darn ugly.

 

bolger-micro-castle.jpg

 

I admire the ample food storage

 

FB- Doug

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The Ratiionist School of deck furniture is well represented by offshore singlehanders as well

 

goldendragon.jpg

 

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I think that there is a rationale beyond standing headroom on these. If the boat is rolled by a wave, the upside down stability is decreased greatly by the high up (low down when inverted) volume.

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Yes, but a small boat will never be heavy and stiff enough so that you are 100% sure not to be rolled just because you met the wrong wave at the wrong time. Once you are upside down, you need a way out....

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I've never thought about how a junk rig, like the one above, would impact inverted stability. With all the additional sheets, or whatever they're called, and the heavy battens I think the junk rig could keep a boat upside down longer than an average sloop rig would.

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The Ratiionist School of deck furniture is well represented by offshore singlehanders as well

 

goldendragon.jpg

 

dd40190191106346a4032191e488eda8.jpg

 

I think that there is a rationale beyond standing headroom on these. If the boat is rolled by a wave, the upside down stability is decreased greatly by the high up (low down when inverted) volume.

 

 

Reckon you're confusing these with lifeboats. Different animals altogether. Main goal is a way of looking out without opening the door. Roger Taylor, owner of the second of the two boats (but not hte man in the photo) seems to spend a monk-like existence at sea, barely going outdoors: he's a very contemplative, philosophical sort of fellow.

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I think that it works a bit the same way even if not as efficient as a for a lifeboat, Bolger discuss this in his "boats with an open mind" book. ISTR that ming ming capsized self-righted and managed to limp back home without assistance. Obviously, it is not just the roof, being narrow helps.

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Agreed, that house is pretty ugly. But it's not as if Bolger himself didn't design a box-like house from time to time:

 

45132548_1ca9f27c55_o.jpg

 

 

Pretty sure this one is longer than what Bolger designed, but his was high and square.

 

Holy crap. That's a whole mud flat full of uglies. Look around.

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Agreed, that house is pretty ugly. But it's not as if Bolger himself didn't design a box-like house from time to time:

 

45132548_1ca9f27c55_o.jpg

 

 

Pretty sure this one is longer than what Bolger designed, but his was high and square.

 

Holy crap. That's a whole mud flat full of uglies. Look around.

 

 

Which one's Brent?

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I think that it works a bit the same way even if not as efficient as a for a lifeboat, Bolger discuss this in his "boats with an open mind" book. ISTR that ming ming capsized self-righted and managed to limp back home without assistance. Obviously, it is not just the roof, being narrow helps.

That might have been the first Ming Ming which I don't think had a big extended coachroof.
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I think that it works a bit the same way even if not as efficient as a for a lifeboat, Bolger discuss this in his "boats with an open mind" book. ISTR that ming ming capsized self-righted and managed to limp back home without assistance. Obviously, it is not just the roof, being narrow helps.

That might have been the first Ming Ming which I don't think had a big extended coachroof.

 

You might be right, I forgot that he has changed boat.

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How exactly? I'm not seeing it - in any way, shape or form.

 

Bolger was very proud of the Birdwatcher concept, and the idea has had a lot of play in the homebuilt boat arena. The basic idea was to combine the cabin and cockpit into one sheltered space. The first boats were set up for sail and oar, but it's pretty tricky to get the oars thru the oar ports, etc. Later boats had small OBs. The original sail area was very modest, as befits an unballasted, narrow boat, but a second rig was bigger. Mostly, boats like this are going to be used in sheltered water so a generous rig makes sense.

 

They are probably going to sail at a good angle of heel quite a lot, but the crew weight is low (always a good thing) and if you put the boat on her side, she is going to float there merrily with no water coming in. You can look for marine life through the big windows. Bolger had a high tolerance high angles of heel, based on his experience with and fondness for sharpies. At anchor close to shore, you get good views of wildlife that's unaware of human presence.

 

Bolger did a more ambitious design called the Jochems Schooner that used a similar concept. It can be steered either from the small helm cockpit or from the cabin.

 

52373975_cd0a1f22f7.jpg

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The Bird watchers may not be everyone's cup of tea but they are actually quite cool boats.

 

http://www.hallman.org/bolger/Birdwatcher/

 

 

How exactly? I'm not seeing it - in any way, shape or form.

 

 

 

"Shape or form" is perhaps the place to start: If you've ever seen a Birdwatcher hull in real-life, the sheer is actually quite elegant. I think the plexiglass "house" throws a lot of people (or their eyes) off. Built of straight cut plywood, it is always a bit of a magical moment when being bent around a few frames produces this sheer and the bottom rocker. I think the Jochems hull Semi referred to is a different path in the Bolger oeuvre-- Whalewatcher would be more analogous to Birdwatcher and would surely offend you if you didn't find the beauty in the Birdwatcher concept.

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The Bird watchers may not be everyone's cup of tea but they are actually quite cool boats.

 

http://www.hallman.org/bolger/Birdwatcher/

 

 

How exactly? I'm not seeing it - in any way, shape or form.

 

 

 

"Shape or form" is perhaps the place to start: If you've ever seen a Birdwatcher hull in real-life, the sheer is actually quite elegant. I think the plexiglass "house" throws a lot of people (or their eyes) off. Built of straight cut plywood, it is always a bit of a magical moment when being bent around a few frames produces this sheer and the bottom rocker. I think the Jochems hull Semi referred to is a different path in the Bolger oeuvre-- Whalewatcher would be more analogous to Birdwatcher and would surely offend you if you didn't find the beauty in the Birdwatcher concept.

 

 

I guess it might feature well in the, 'Ornithologist Monthly'. In which case I'll concede on "function".

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I guess it might feature well in the, 'Ornithologist Monthly'. In which case I'll concede on "function".

 

See? It ain't so hard. If you squint. Atta boy (no one can say you didn't give it the ol' college try...)

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So... ummm... it's a very capable-looking little boat and I kind of admire the outrigger tiller thingy.

 

14856174_10157658737500371_8938308669838

 

It is odd.

But, I do not think it is ugly.

I enjoy looking at it. :)

 

that boat is very cool. Beautiful in a certain way. The bow and stern come off and store in the cockpit when not in use. I think it's really cool.

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Yeah, I noticed on FB someone commented that it's a nester.

 

I admire the fact that I can't tell how the heck that works by looking for seams. But I agree with the FB commenter that it's a lot of extra weight, building, and complexity for no really good reason I can determine. Maybe the owner has one. Usually, a boat is made into a nester to make it small, but that one's already small. I'm not sure how making it a bit shorter really helps.

 

One thing I don't admire: I've spent enough hours of my life fucking with sailboats at boat ramps. In my old Sun Cat, I'd be gone before he finished fishing the bow and stern out of the cockpit and long before he got to the part about spars and strings.

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The Ratiionist School of deck furniture is well represented by offshore singlehanders as well

 

goldendragon.jpg

 

dd40190191106346a4032191e488eda8.jpg

I think that there is a rationale beyond standing headroom on these. If the boat is rolled by a wave, the upside down stability is decreased greatly by the high up (low down when inverted) volume.

 

Reckon you're confusing these with lifeboats. Different animals altogether. Main goal is a way of looking out without opening the door. Roger Taylor, owner of the second of the two boats (but not hte man in the photo) seems to spend a monk-like existence at sea, barely going outdoors: he's a very contemplative, philosophical sort of fellow.

 

also keep in mind that Roger sails in latitudes normal people only ever see on youtube.

the functionality on the inside of that cabin is way more important than its look at 79°N

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Yeah, I noticed on FB someone commented that it's a nester.

 

I admire the fact that I can't tell how the heck that works by looking for seams. But I agree with the FB commenter that it's a lot of extra weight, building, and complexity for no really good reason I can determine. Maybe the owner has one. Usually, a boat is made into a nester to make it small, but that one's already small. I'm not sure how making it a bit shorter really helps.

 

One thing I don't admire: I've spent enough hours of my life fucking with sailboats at boat ramps. In my old Sun Cat, I'd be gone before he finished fishing the bow and stern out of the cockpit and long before he got to the part about spars and strings.

I think storage space was the issue. Might keep it in his apartment or house

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