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Yeah, the boat looks like shit.  But they're smiling, which is the reason to sail......

This is what happens when you wear socks with sandals.

No trailer, no problem.  Just drill through the bilge keels and slide the axle right in. A couple of fittings from Harbor Freight and your off to the scrap yard!

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5 hours ago, Israel Hands said:

Here's a homely gal from Alabamy

https://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/90005

 

Philip Bolger Designed AS29 Sharpie Cat Yawl Rig Click to launch Larger Image

That boat has some history. Started out as a nice looking Bolger AS29 (if one likes Bolger's large sharpies with bilgeboards). Passed from the builder to the second owner (christened Alisa), and the onto a third owner (christened Pandora). Looked good in white with blue trim. Then it was sold to the current (4th) owners who glued foam board to exterior of the hull, painted it yellow, and cut the huge, huge windows. They completed the Loop about 4-5 years ago; it looked like they motored most of the way. I corresponded with them a few years ago and they said the mast was rotted.  I have a soft spot in my heart for Bolger sharpies, esp. the AS29 and 39. But this one? Not my cup of tea.

Snubs

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18 minutes ago, snubber said:
5 hours ago, Israel Hands said:

Here's a homely gal from Alabamy

https://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/90005

 

Philip Bolger Designed AS29 Sharpie Cat Yawl Rig Click to launch Larger Image

That boat has some history. Started out as a nice looking Bolger AS29 (if one likes Bolger's large sharpies with bilgeboards). Passed from the builder to the second owner (christened Alisa), and the onto a third owner (christened Pandora). Looked good in white with blue trim. Then it was sold to the current (4th) owners who glued foam board to exterior of the hull, painted it yellow, and cut the huge, huge windows. They completed the Loop about 4-5 years ago; it looked like they motored most of the way. I corresponded with them a few years ago and they said the mast was rotted.  I have a soft spot in my heart for Bolger sharpies, esp. the AS29 and 39. But this one? Not my cup of tea.

Snubs

Longevity is a big issue with these boats. Any minor sloppiness in building is certain to produce a soft spot giving rise to a rotten spot etc etc. Of course, repair is relatively easy on a simple box.

In general, I really like Bolger box boats. I've only built (2) and used (3) small ones. They work just fine, they're good enough boats that I think our obsession with shapely hulls is just about pointless for 90%+ of usage. But the utility of building a big box boat seems less now that mass-produced cruiser-racers are going for pennies on the market... well, covid-induced market upheavals notwithstanding...

FB- Doug

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1 hour ago, Steam Flyer said:

In general, I really like Bolger box boats. I've only built (2) and used (3) small ones. They work just fine, they're good enough boats that I think our obsession with shapely hulls is just about pointless for 90%+ of usage. But the utility of building a big box boat seems less now that mass-produced cruiser-racers are going for pennies on the market... well, covid-induced market upheavals notwithstanding...

If a used plastic cruiser-racer fits your purposes, then sure -- that's much better value than a huge bunch a labour to build a wooden sharpie.

But if you actually want a boat with minimal draft and a mast on a tabernacle, then a plastic-cruiser-racer simply won't do the job.

This one's 5 years on the hard may be a sign that that there is something seriously amiss.  The boat may even have reached the end of its life.  But if the repairs are not too major, then this may be the perfect Great Loop boat

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2 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Longevity is a big issue with these boats. Any minor sloppiness in building is certain to produce a soft spot giving rise to a rotten spot etc etc. Of course, repair is relatively easy on a simple box.

In general, I really like Bolger box boats. I've only built (2) and used (3) small ones. They work just fine, they're good enough boats that I think our obsession with shapely hulls is just about pointless for 90%+ of usage. But the utility of building a big box boat seems less now that mass-produced cruiser-racers are going for pennies on the market... well, covid-induced market upheavals notwithstanding...

FB- Doug

Agreed (RE soft spots and rot). When this particular AS29 was Alisa, it suffered rot where the bilgeboard trunk connects to the hull bottom. I remember the owner at the time detailed the repair online. I used top quality materials for my Long Micro and it still had a few areas that required grinding or removal. I view annual maintenance a portion of the cost of owning a wooden-ish (GRP) boat. 

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That thing is so ugly inside that I dont think you could get homeless people to move in.  Well maybe cats.  Cats might like that litterbox.

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6 hours ago, Dogscout said:

That thing is so ugly inside that I dont think you could get homeless people to move in.  Well maybe cats.  Cats might like that litterbox.

:lol:

But (if sound) very practical for many types of long term cruising. Your boat is very nice indeed, but it can neither pull up to a beach nor run under a bridge, whereas one of these boats (if sound) could do everything your boat can do in open water... just not as fast, especially up wind. Nor as good looking, which is a rather specialized function and it's highly valued.

But then it wouldn't be in the "uglyboats" thread!

FB- Doug

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8 hours ago, snubber said:

Agreed (RE soft spots and rot). When this particular AS29 was Alisa, it suffered rot where the bilgeboard trunk connects to the hull bottom. I remember the owner at the time detailed the repair online. I used top quality materials for my Long Micro and it still had a few areas that required grinding or removal. I view annual maintenance a portion of the cost of owning a wooden-ish (GRP) boat. 

Long Micro seems like a really nice little boat, it's one I admire for combining conventional good looks with functionality and such a simple build. I had a friend with an AS-19 which he (an ex-marine) referred to as a "Landing Craft, Sail... Small... with lots of beer." It sailed pretty well, except for hard on the wind. He modified it to have a bigger hatch with a pop-up for headroom, which kind of spoiled the forward hatch which was important for access to the forward "bay" which was very practical as designed. He used it for weekend expeditions to isolated places that very few people and very boats with any accomodation can get to, such as the marshy islands along North Carolina's sounds. It could carry a remarkable load of gear and supplies without seeming to go down on her lines, much... IMHO it did affect her sailing but he didn't seem to notice or care.

One of those, or a Martha Jane, would be a fantastic Everglades Challenge boat.

I built a couple of box dinghies including a 'minimized' shoe box that was 5'6" LOA and could in fact carry two adults... that was actually one of the most fun boats I've ever owned, easy enough to carry around that you could almost forget you'd brought it. It's the only dinghy I've ever carried inside a cruising boats cabin, when my cousin and I found out it would fit down his companionway. It's also the only dinghy I have ever carried up a snowy hill, to sled down. Unfortunately I built it out of cheap materials (luan underlayment) and it was very short lived.... turned to mulch in about 3~4 years.

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Quote

 Then it was sold to the current (4th) owners who glued foam board to exterior of the hull, painted it yellow, and cut the huge, huge windows. 

I doubt Bolger contemplated four (4!) owners. He was trying for the smallest pile of materials with the assumption that also meant small cost and small building time. Properly fitted out, an AS-29 looks shipshape and does work. Bolger would agree that you could compile more money, time, and skill into a better boat. 

To illustrate the point, consider some alternate designs with similar capabilities, but more conventional design. First, Tanton design #940, SeaWeed.  Thirty=four feet long. 

Second, Karl Stambaugh's Bahama Mama.

You are welcome to prefer either to the AS-29, but the Bolger boat will be halfway around the Great Loop before you launch.

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4 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Long Micro seems like a really nice little boat, it's one I admire for combining conventional good looks with functionality and such a simple build. I had a friend with an AS-19 which he (an ex-marine) referred to as a "Landing Craft, Sail... Small... with lots of beer." It sailed pretty well, except for hard on the wind. He modified it to have a bigger hatch with a pop-up for headroom, which kind of spoiled the forward hatch which was important for access to the forward "bay" which was very practical as designed. He used it for weekend expeditions to isolated places that very few people and very boats with any accomodation can get to, such as the marshy islands along North Carolina's sounds. It could carry a remarkable load of gear and supplies without seeming to go down on her lines, much... IMHO it did affect her sailing but he didn't seem to notice or care.

One of those, or a Martha Jane, would be a fantastic Everglades Challenge boat.

I built a couple of box dinghies including a 'minimized' shoe box that was 5'6" LOA and could in fact carry two adults... that was actually one of the most fun boats I've ever owned, easy enough to carry around that you could almost forget you'd brought it. It's the only dinghy I've ever carried inside a cruising boats cabin, when my cousin and I found out it would fit down his companionway. It's also the only dinghy I have ever carried up a snowy hill, to sled down. Unfortunately I built it out of cheap materials (luan underlayment) and it was very short lived.... turned to mulch in about 3~4 years.

FB- Doug

1. AS-19 is awesome. I like what it represents in the evolution of Bolger's thinking, as he worked towards Micro and Long Micro, and I love the landing craft bow. I contemplated building one, but I like a ballasted boat and opted for LM. 

2. Martha Jane is cool. I recall (around early 2000s) there was some debate about its ability to right itself when swamped and a discussion about adding sponsons or floatation high on the cockpit coaming. The concern stemmed (I think) that someone in Oz had swamped their MJ and it would not float upright. I recall there's an MJ and an AS29 in coastal NC.  

3. The allure of Bolger ("glue the plywood. Paint it. Go sail") is also the undoing. For a shoebox, that's fine. But I have seen many of his mid-sized boats for sale, built of ply-and-paint, partially rotted with badly checked plywood. I used marine ply and a lot of fiberglass and epoxy and still have an occasional issue with water intrusion (usually a deck leak), or spots where the un-fiberglassed ply checks. I kept my LM docked for a few seasons, but now my she spends most of her time either indoors on the trailer, or (now) under a tarp. It's slowed the maintenance.

Snubs

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3 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

I doubt Bolger contemplated four (4!) owners. He was trying for the smallest pile of materials with the assumption that also meant small cost and small building time. Properly fitted out, an AS-29 looks shipshape and does work. Bolger would agree that you could compile more money, time, and skill into a better boat. 

To illustrate the point, consider some alternate designs with similar capabilities, but more conventional design. First, Tanton design #940, SeaWeed.  Thirty=four feet long. 

Second, Karl Stambaugh's Bahama Mama.

You are welcome to prefer either to the AS-29, but the Bolger boat will be halfway around the Great Loop before you launch.

Agreed. Bolger was practical and simple in his designs. Susan A., who was the force behind the AS29 upgrade (some of which is good, but the steel-plate ballast is a not-so-good-idea, methinks) leaned towards more complicated shapes and designs. Her drawings of the last AS shaprie, the AS34 (?). show a multi-chine hull with bilge boards. *gasp. The horror*. 

Snubs

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19 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

my friend martin in his bolger

 

As always, so well filmed. Interesting to see the junk but I must say I absolutely love the films when you have the shots of the one design classes and the local sailboats just happily tacking along.  Makes everything feel right in the world, you know. 

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Speaking of Bulgers, I don't remember if this has been posted - or indeed if I've already posted it - but this was built where I used to holiday 30 odd years ago, I have always found it an oddly beautiful craft. Obviously capable too, having sailed the whole east coast of Australia and beyond. 

Image result for bolger cat yawl

Image result for bolger cat yawlImage result for bolger cat yawl

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16 minutes ago, ALL@SEA said:

Speaking of Bulgers, I don't remember if this has been posted - or indeed if I've already posted it - but this was built where I used to holiday 30 odd years ago, I have always found it an oddly beautiful craft. Obviously capable too, having sailed the whole east coast of Australia and beyond. 

Image result for bolger cat yawl

Image result for bolger cat yawlImage result for bolger cat yawl

I think... not sure... that is ROMP which is intended to be a shallow-water-capable ocean cruiser. Very high LPOS (he explained it differently in the book) due to the sheer and the distribution of volume in the ends of the hull, and (if built as designed) a big steel bar buried in the keel. If so, this is a very different boat that his sharpies.

Whatever, it's a beauty! Thanks!

FB- Doug

 

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36 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

I think... not sure... that is ROMP which is intended to be a shallow-water-capable ocean cruiser. Very high LPOS (he explained it differently in the book) due to the sheer and the distribution of volume in the ends of the hull, and (if built as designed) a big steel bar buried in the keel. If so, this is a very different boat that his sharpies.

Whatever, it's a beauty! Thanks!

FB- Doug

 

Yes, a Romp named "Beluga Too". Was for sail in Qld, Australia in 2014. Spec sheet listed it as a SS centerboard with a 2" SS shoe. She looked to be in wonderful shape. Big, open interior (except for the centerboard case), with berths running P+S, and a small galley. Romp04.thumb.jpg.5a83ffd765812e8e19537f6cf75008df.jpg

Romp02.jpg

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The cabin is fugly to my eye. Original design of this boat was pretty. But I admire how much room you have inside and acknowledge her suitability for purpose of cruising the PNW and SE AK.

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1967/cheoy-lee-center-cockpit-sloop-3752924/
 

 

uglycheoylee.JPG

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Where's George Barris when he's needed?

Painting the cabin sides pale grey might help the visuals

Or even white. There is no place for babyshit brown on a boat.

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5 hours ago, RogerC said:

Not all the classics are classics.  I like a good bowsprit as much as the next bloke, but a good thing can be taken too far.

 

jB1g6SU.jpg

Looks good to me. It's a good curb feeler for sailing in the fog, too

FB- Doug

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5 hours ago, RogerC said:

Not all the classics are classics.  I like a good bowsprit as much as the next bloke, but a good thing can be taken too far.

RogerC, that attitude is irresponsible. :(

Short bowsprits have a frustratingly low casualty rate.  The low risk of imminent death leads to arrogance amongst bow men.

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On 2/22/2021 at 1:54 PM, Ishmael said:

Or even white. There is no place for babyshit brown on a boat.

You should tell Nautor. All the bilges for the classic swans are baby poop. 

fad9267e7c33262a1225161d07cb3b89.jpg

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1 hour ago, Elegua said:

You should tell Nautor. All the bilges for the classic swans are baby poop. 

Does the colour matter down there?  The classic Swans are dark woodcaves inside, so how can you tell what colour it is?

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31 minutes ago, TwoLegged said:

Does the colour matter down there?  The classic Swans are dark woodcaves inside, so how can you tell what colour it is?

Light a match?

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3 minutes ago, Ishmael said:
34 minutes ago, TwoLegged said:

Does the colour matter down there?  The classic Swans are dark woodcaves inside, so how can you tell what colour it is?

Light a match?

That's the way to change the colour to black.

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43 minutes ago, TwoLegged said:

Does the colour matter down there?  The classic Swans are dark woodcaves inside, so how can you tell what colour it is?

No, they are not. Ours had a nice light colored koto wood interior and plenty of deck prisms for natural light away from the dog house and hatches. Just the bilges were brown. 

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32 minutes ago, Whinging Pom said:

1972 Swan 40

I have a soft spot for the Swan 40.  First keelboat I ever got to sail on, aged about ten.  The boat was still young enough to be winning offshore races, and our spin around the bay under main alone in a force 5/6 was thrilling.  A completely different experience to the open boats I had sailed since I was a toddler.

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  • 3 weeks later...
4 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

Smuggler's vessel maybe, but submarine no. Not even Brit Chance would think that flat transom could be dragged through the water. 

Are there actual submersible smuggling boats?   Or don't they get caught, so there is no evidence?  After all, John Holland managed it with 120 year old technology and less equipment then a modern cartel can afford.   The Germans used blockade running U-boats to evade destroyers with depth charges.   Unless the coast guard starts using sonar and loitering a day or so for the boat to resurface, 100 feet dive depth and 3 knots submerged would be adequate.   You don't even need WW I performance.   

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My first thought was, "Maybe it wasn't intended to be a submarine, but that's how it worked out..."

Creative marketing to unload one of those backyard monstrosities on to someone who can actually afford it.

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2 hours ago, Lark said:

Are there actual submersible smuggling boats?   Or don't they get caught, so there is no evidence?  After all, John Holland managed it with 120 year old technology and less equipment then a modern cartel can afford.   The Germans used blockade running U-boats to evade destroyers with depth charges.   Unless the coast guard starts using sonar and loitering a day or so for the boat to resurface, 100 feet dive depth and 3 knots submerged would be adequate.   You don't even need WW I performance.   

Cocaine U-boats are old news.

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That's because non of these vessels are actually "submarines". Better description might be 'low riders'. They cannot go fully submersed at all, they are meant to have just the 'conning tower/air intakes' above water. Watch the video attached to the pic above to see one in action

    The thing the Spanish police found is really weird, not a 'low rider' at all, but a re-used power boat hull with spray chines to reduce the visual amount of spray. Painting it light blue to blend in? And incorporating a garage door in the stern for those moonlit nights

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Cocaine U-boats are old news.

Can you reference one that can completely submerge and resurface?   I've never seen a report of one with actual ballast and trim tanks, diving planes, water pressure gauge, etc.  All I've seen are low riders as longy calls them, mislabeled as submarines by ignorant reporters looking for a headline and missing the submerge detail.  

The only report I've seen was this one, found in a jungle.   Its reported to be a short range boat, never actually used.    For the millions of dollars involved, the apparent fact that nobody has bothered to recreate the technical ability of a WW I u-boat (without the need for torpedoes) either means nobody has caught one, or that shipping Chinese fentanyl by mail is so safe and reliable they have no need to risk their necks at sea.   

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1 hour ago, Lark said:

Can you reference one that can completely submerge and resurface?   

I read about one a couple or 3 years ago IIRC caught off Central America that seemed to fully submerge, albeit extremely unpleasantly and dangerously for the 2 or 3 crew.

Not going to research it for you though.

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12 hours ago, SloopJonB said:
13 hours ago, Lark said:

Can you reference one that can completely submerge and resurface?   

I read about one a couple or 3 years ago IIRC caught off Central America that seemed to fully submerge, albeit extremely unpleasantly and dangerously for the 2 or 3 crew.

Not going to research it for you though.

I've read about a couple that could cruise at snorkel depth. Much less of a challenge but still potentially deadly.

FB- Doug

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4 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

I've read about a couple that could cruise at snorkel depth. Much less of a challenge but still potentially deadly.

Given the profits involved in drug smuggling, it is very surprising that the smugglers have not invested more heavily in better submarines.

I guess that they get a high enough success rate from other methods that there has been no need to invest in expensive machines.

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It's not so easy to buy a real submarine; I don't doubt that some corrupt third world navy would sell one to a private party, but I can't believe that's going to be a normal thing.  And it's a far cry from finding someone who can build a low rider to having the ability to build an actual submersible.  The technology may be over 100 years old, but figuring out how to actually get one built (even to WWI standards) has to be limited to a very few number of people.

Even assuming you could find a used sub or figure out how to build one, training a crew to be able to sail one successfully has to be just as difficult.    

Granted, the money to be made is vast; still, I don't see how spending millions on one vessel and crew is going to be cost effective.

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Writing from a country that owns a number of second hand submarines, it seems to me that giving such a craft to a drug cartel would be a great way to immediately bankrupt their operation.

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1 hour ago, andykane said:

Writing from a country that owns a number of second hand submarines, it seems to me that giving such a craft to a drug cartel would be a great way to immediately bankrupt their operation.

Sounds like a good plan to me.

They seem to be able to afford planes... maybe if we get them hooked on horses and sailing?

FB- Doug

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3 hours ago, andykane said:

Writing from a country that owns a number of second hand submarines, it seems to me that giving such a craft to a drug cartel would be a great way to immediately bankrupt their operation.

All they need is a coke habit.  That will surely bankrupt them.  :D

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5 hours ago, andykane said:

Writing from a country that owns a number of second hand submarines, it seems to me that giving such a craft to a drug cartel would be a great way to immediately bankrupt their operation.

true!  those diesel UK bargains were anything but!

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  • 3 weeks later...

It never occurred to them to route the engine exhaust out the transom?  

I admire the absence of crap on the back. 

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2 hours ago, Bugsy said:

It never occurred to them to route the engine exhaust out the transom? 

Probably a dry stack - fishboats use them a lot here.

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3 hours ago, RogerC said:

I like sailboats but I often wish there was a telephone booth stuck in the middle of the cockpit  SAY NO MORE

 

3ISSPSM.jpg

That's a well-camouflaged Tardis.

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13 hours ago, RogerC said:

I like sailboats but I often wish there was a telephone booth stuck in the middle of the cockpit  SAY NO MORE

 

3ISSPSM.jpg

Early Tasmanian fishing boat - they generally have a wheelhouse like that. Built as a commercial vessel, so doesn't qualify.

May be an image of outdoors

May be an image of lake and nature

May be an image of body of water

May be an image of body of water and nature... I guess growing up with them I've always found them beautiful, and she's a well preserved example.. you'd certainly appreciate the shelter if you saw the conditions they fish in. As for the exhaust, JonB is onto it - I believe it gibe longer engine life - again, commercial consideration  ... gotta admit that was nearly a downvote from me as I took it a bit too personally! 

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Saw this at ERR several years ago. I believe it was converted to a family cruiser. Not pretty, but has a certain charm.

anyuXFY1SlmG8PX7vcxZIg_thumb_708.thumb.jpg.96234e7fd0384ac330e953ee5880e076.jpg

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On 3/17/2021 at 7:59 PM, Hukilau said:

It's not so easy to buy a real submarine; I don't doubt that some corrupt third world navy would sell one to a private party, but I can't believe that's going to be a normal thing.  And it's a far cry from finding someone who can build a low rider to having the ability to build an actual submersible.  The technology may be over 100 years old, but figuring out how to actually get one built (even to WWI standards) has to be limited to a very few number of people.

Even assuming you could find a used sub or figure out how to build one, training a crew to be able to sail one successfully has to be just as difficult.    

Granted, the money to be made is vast; still, I don't see how spending millions on one vessel and crew is going to be cost effective.

Well, one businessman in Finland bought one in 1993, one like this. Of couse ex-soviet boat which was delivered to finland for scrapping. Later lost during tow after being sold to Thailand in 2007.

I would guess that crew is largest issue and dockyard needed. It is not like you can keep boat in service even if you had money. 

36271286831_4e10ed4ed5_b.jpg

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

Saw this at ERR several years ago. I believe it was converted to a family cruiser. Not pretty, but has a certain charm.

anyuXFY1SlmG8PX7vcxZIg_thumb_708.thumb.jpg.96234e7fd0384ac330e953ee5880e076.jpg

Sardine carrier.  They’re actually quite pretty, and some have been converted to pretty elegant cruisers.  Grayling is probably the best example   Graylingz.jpg

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3 hours ago, eliboat said:

Sardine carrier.  They’re actually quite pretty, and some have been converted to pretty elegant cruisers.  Grayling is probably the best example   Graylingz.jpg

Beautiful article about her in WoodenBoat. GRAYLING is pretty.

There's a lot to be said for the concept, since it offers so much deck space. Heck, you could put out some Adirondack chairs and a picnic table.

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4 hours ago, Pertsa said:

Well, one businessman in Finland bought one in 1993, one like this. Of couse ex-soviet boat which was delivered to finland for scrapping. Later lost during tow after being sold to Thailand in 2007.

I would guess that crew is largest issue and dockyard needed. It is not like you can keep boat in service even if you had money. 

36271286831_4e10ed4ed5_b.jpg

Oh, a businessman?

image.png.6097847ab630cb789f990f73f2e9208b.png

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3 hours ago, eliboat said:

Sardine carrier.  They’re actually quite pretty, and some have been converted to pretty elegant cruisers.  Grayling is probably the best example   Graylingz.jpg

Here's something very like her going down Muscle Ridge 

ACtC-3chL3gqH5xk3KPzgaYs5xsTnvO1zSS81cIW

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10 hours ago, Elegua said:

Here's something very like her going down Muscle Ridge 

ACtC-3chL3gqH5xk3KPzgaYs5xsTnvO1zSS81cIW

That would be the Irene Alton, an actual working boat and not yachtified.  Found regularly banging around southwestern Penobscot Bay.  Not many photos online so here’s the best I could find:

0559FD98-51F5-4DA0-9EF3-82F4DD70D501.thumb.png.d0dad2b24aed664daa572e8a4d36f24e.png

 

The best carrier in the area is the Double Eagle of Rockland.  A much better kept boat than its age and career would normally warrant.  Still working for a living and usually immaculate:

CA362AE7-16AA-45A2-99DA-16FBC09CCD02.thumb.png.1ec2fe88eb34e3533c4c1ab21e96eac8.png

 

Sorry, isn’t this the ugly thread?  My apologies for the drift!

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1 hour ago, NaClH20 said:

That would be the Irene Alton, an actual working boat and not yachtified.  Found regularly banging around southwestern Penobscot Bay.  Not many photos online so here’s the best I could find:

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Sorry, isn’t this the ugly thread?  My apologies for the drift!

That's great! I love how you recognize her from a crappy long distance shot. This is another photo - so I think you're right. 

 

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8 hours ago, Elegua said:

That's great! I love how you recognize her from a crappy long distance shot. This is another photo - so I think you're right. 

 

ACtC-3dyZvDo6cH0GJ_IEui2QqMsmTwDkhkFMHDX

 

It’s the distinct sweep of the sheer just before the transom.... would recognize that anywhere, and was the first thing that popped in my head before I read “Mussel Ridge”.  I’m up and down the Ridge a couple times a week year round so she’s a familiar face.

 

Heres more (less?) of the Double Eagle doing what they do.  Used to be a much more common sight... carriers worked mostly in the summer when the weather was nice and didn’t have far to go, so would regularly load decks awash.

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Ok, now I’m done thread drifting!

 

....alright, no  I’m not.  The first exposure to real boat handling was from the skipper of the Jacob Pike, another carrier in the area (and sister to the Pauline, which got turned into a motorized windjammer of sorts.  Incidentally, anyone going through Lincolnville Beach can order a lobster roll from the Pauline’s original wheelhouse).  They used to stay at the Rockland cannery, which is gone now.  It was usually just one guy running the boat, which was 85’ if memory serves.  He would just calmly amble in and put the boat in gear, then wander up to the bow and take in the line, then back to the wheelhouse for reverse, then a flick to get the spring in while he goes by.... was just a symphony of unhurried competence that struck me as remarkable, and such a contrast to a lot of guys who feel it necessary to have a lot of engine noise and propellor froth and yelling.  Took a lot of years but I’d like to think that I can honor that old skipper now.

 

now I’m done.

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This thread drift keeps reminding me more and more of the vessel used in "The Guns of Navarrone" film (1961). As a kid, I wondered why the commandos didn't choose the beautiful sailing yacht for their mission, as an old fart, I wonder why the yacht was even considered, ahhh Hollywood..... Of course, the story was set in the Aegean Sea and.......

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14 hours ago, Moore Play said:

This thread drift keeps reminding me more and more of the vessel used in "The Guns of Navarrone" film (1961). As a kid, I wondered why the commandos didn't choose the beautiful sailing yacht for their mission, as an old fart, I wonder why the yacht was even considered, ahhh Hollywood..... Of course, the story was set in the Aegean Sea and.......

I don’t recall the conundrum in question, but didn’t Sterling Hayden (for one) famously sail commandos around the Adriatic?  Advantage of stealth, I suppose.  

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