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I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Available as a sloop or yawl.

My old Schooner "Europe". The first yacht registered under the brand new European Union flag. Baptised  by Princess Grace Kelly of Monaco. We acquired the boat after she went around the world. Thank y

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44 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

So Bob is innovative.

Thank you for admitting it.

You don’t need to say anymore

I was specifically talking about the pilot cutters but obviously you chose to be offended.

It's tiresome, there are many threads about bob's boats but the fans feel obliged to hijack all threads.

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9 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Here's a bit more self promotion. I rather enjoy doing it.. I'm proud of the boats I have designed.  The FB fan club is approaching 4,000 members now. It appears that others also enjoy looking at my designs. Might as well continue to piss off a handful of CA'ers off. Can't hurt.

This is an early Baba 40 PH model built for a Vancouver TV personality. It had a lot of custom touches and is quite the boat. It was just bought by a Seattle couple who are very happy with it. It's just a big old heavy double ender but it's a robust boat, as El Jefe proved and I think it's pretty good looking for a PH boat.

32031012678_61904f85de_b.jpgBaba 40- PH greens by robert perry, on Flickr

"Might as well continue to piss off a handful of CA'ers off. Can't hurt."  well, you couldn't be more wrong Bob.  I, personally, am fabulously wealthy and I was just about to contact you regarding the design of an innovative sailing yacht.  After this comment however, I'm off to Comox to look up Brent Swain...harrumph.

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Zonks:

I went through a lot of my photos of the Carbon cutter build looking for definitive shots on the gudgeon detail. This is the best I can do.

The actual gudgeon was molded up separately then epoxied in place on the transom. Then the taping was added. If you look carefully in one photo you can see the rebate in the gudgeon piece for the taping. Tapes went through vertical slots cut each side of the gudgeon to wrap accros the inner face of the transom. Transom face is reinforced athwartships and vertically with shelf and brackets used to hold gear like autopilot.

Hope this help explain.

45858543212_db75d0e7e7_k.jpgGud 5 by robert perry, on Flickr

45858558182_40f52ce0af_k.jpgGud 3 by robert perry, on Flickr

30969276497_588bcbea2a_k.jpgGud 2 by robert perry, on Flickr

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Steam:

Very doubtful. As I have said many times here, the beauty of dong a relatively heavy boat with CF is that we can "overbuild" details. There was no impetus to go light anywhere on this build. The way the cutter is built there is no "joint" where the transom meets the hull, it's moncocoque. Again, there is a quite a bit of internal structure reinforcing the transom face and bonding it to the hull sides. It was  hard area to photograph and I only have two not very definitive shots of that area.

" But what  if aliens came down and sucked the transom off the boat?"

It's always something.

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

This particular thread drift is going nowhere, and is not adding to the general enjoyment. Perhaps someone will start a new thread about it. That way it can be contained.

I agree, I was checking this thread mostly silently and enjoying it, no need for a new thread though, feel free to revive the argument clinic :

or the carbon cutters thread :

or the other carbon cutters thread in sailing anarchy.

 

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I LOVE the gudgeon detail. Looks very strong and purposeful.

Here's a fun vid. This boat is the little sister, 55', to the 70' Toroa discussed earlier:

 

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6 hours ago, Panoramix said:

Thanks, I find trolling pathetic.

I will also give him Francis Lee as innovative. Having a narrow hull so slippery that you need a 40 footer rig to push a 70 feet boat is innovative in my books. I know that sailing canoes have been popular and that the Swedish did long and narrow boats but there is a lot to admire in this boat and it is unique enough to be called innovative in my view.

62 feet.

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1 hour ago, Bob Perry said:

Southern:

I see your point. I'd have given that boat a traditionally raked transom. I can't see what this accomplishes. Maybe if I knew exactly what they were trying to accomplish I'd appreciate it more. No accounting for taste.

Bob, maybe the owner wanted it that way. ;)

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30 minutes ago, Jammer Six said:

Well, if Bob "contained" his self promotion to threads he started for that purpose, like he's done in the past, everyone would be happy.

Or as happy as he's capable of being, anyway.

Mate, if you have an opinion just say it once and move on...

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57 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

Slick:

Yes, those pesky owners can direct some design decisions. I'm fine with that so long as it does not effect the performance of the boat. In this case it does not.

Bob, in the case of Restive, the original owner, a close friend, says he spent well over a month and 6 iterations going back and forth  with Niels Helleberg to get the bow profile just right to HIS eye, and to get it properly balanced with the stern overhang. To my eye as well, it works perfectly.  

It was his second custom build with Helleberg, after doing two customs with Aage Nielsen.  For the first few years of our friendship, while I had the Hinckley, he was constantly on me to do a custom of my own, he says it's the most fun he's ever had with money.  Mr. Bottles, it seems, would probably agree.

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Loser:

I think some clients get more of a kick out of the process than they do actually owning the boat. "What do you mean? Now I have to  use the boat?"

On CATARI we went back and forth over the shape of the bow. One Friday I must have drawn at least a half dozen bow profiles for Paul. We finally ended up with a plumb stem with a slight reverse rake. Paul called it the "You talkin' to me?" bow or the "De Niro" bow. It was brutal.  He said he would present it t his wife over the weekend for her approval.

Monday morning came and Paul  called. I asked him what Sue thought of the`bow. I'll nver forget what he said. He said, "She could not have hated it more." She wanted a graceful bow overhang. She got it.

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8 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

Loser:

I think some clients get more of a kick out of the process than they do actually owning the boat. "What do you mean? Now I have to  use the boat?"

On CATARI we went back and forth over the shape of the bow. One Friday I must have drawn at least a half dozen bow profiles for Paul. We finally ended up with a plumb stem with a slight reverse rake. Paul called it the "You talkin' to me?" bow or the "De Niro" bow. It was brutal.  He said he would present it t his wife over the weekend for her approval.

Monday morning came and Paul  called. I asked him what Sue thought of the`bow. I'll nver forget what he said. He said, "She could not have hated it more." She wanted a graceful bow overhang. She got it.

for naught...

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Bob

 

Hope they flood that big baggie with dry nitrogen to preserve all that nice work for an eventual launch. Do give Paul a poke!  Maybe he could launch CATARI off on the next SpaceX BFG (Big Fucking Rocket) like Musk did with his Tesla. Probably has the cash to do so too!

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Thanks for the in process shots of the gudgeon. I guess if the pin is 1" it all makes sense. 

I totally agree with overbuilding in carbon. If I believed my calculations for my CF chainplates on my boat I would have built them 3 mm thick. But that looked way too skinny. So they were something like 8 or 10 mm because it "looked right".

Can't find the calc but...

5/16" 1x19 s.s. wire has a breaking strength of about 5000 kg = 50000 N. Carbon uni is about 600 MPa tensile failure for my workmanship.

So need cross sectional area of 50000 N/600 MPa = 83.33 mm2 x (SF of 3) = 250mm2.

Chainplates are 75mm wide, so 250mm2 / 75mm = 3mm

But nobody looks at a 3mm thick chainplate and says "that looks pretty good". So when you make it strong enough to look right, it is super overbuilt.

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Zonks:

That is very funny. Tim Kernan was working with me when we did the 56' STARBUCK. Tim engineered the cf chainplates. They were our first  CF chainplates. I flew down to Longbeach and took the drawings to Dennis Choate, the builder. He looked over the detail and said, "Not enough CF." I called Tim back in the office and said, "Dennis said there's not enough CF." Tim was emphatic that his calcs were correct. He double checked and called me at the yard. He said the calcs were fine. Dennis wanted more CF.

I drove with Dennis to the marina and we looked at an Alan Andrews 70'er. "See how thick those are. That's what I'm talking about." Ok I said, "Is that what Alan spec;d?"

"No, we doubled what Alan spec'd."

FACK!

Of course in the end we doubled what out calcs said we needed and everyone was happy. You are right. It just doesn't look like enough.

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3 hours ago, olaf hart said:

Mate, if you have an opinion just say it once and move on...

I'm happy with jammy panties blocked. Wish everyone would quit quoting him. Over 10yrz heat and I've blocked 2 ppl. Like it that way though. 

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3 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Olaf:

Perfectly happy here. Sushi for an early lunch and now waiting for two visiting sailors. Everything is going swimmingly.

I will continue to post what I want where I want. Why not? It's sailing Anarchy.

40163286355_5badbea57d_k.jpg006 by robert perry, on Flickr

My daughter stole my drafting desk and arm. I'm willing to bet it's since had a few dogs and cats on it.

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2 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Loser:

I think some clients get more of a kick out of the process than they do actually owning the boat. "What do you mean? Now I have to  use the boat?"

On CATARI we went back and forth over the shape of the bow. One Friday I must have drawn at least a half dozen bow profiles for Paul. We finally ended up with a plumb stem with a slight reverse rake. Paul called it the "You talkin' to me?" bow or the "De Niro" bow. It was brutal.  He said he would present it t his wife over the weekend for her approval.

Monday morning came and Paul  called. I asked him what Sue thought of the`bow. I'll nver forget what he said. He said, "She could not have hated it more." She wanted a graceful bow overhang. She got it.

That's some funny shit, right there.

In George's case he sailed the shit out of all of his boats. Restive did Bermuda most years he owned her, unless he wintered her in the Bras D'Or, as did 2 of his prior boats. Made it easier to get to Newfoundland. If he didn't have crew, he'd singlehand. 

But he also loved the process. I don't believe that he's ever owned a production cruising boat. Four custom builds over about 40 years, each one a little better than the last. The last 2 were 47' and 48', he didn't want bigger, he wanted faster and really just wanted to do another custom build. 

 

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18 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Zonks:

Not sure what you mean. The gudgeons are as big as the gudgeons need to be for a 1" titanium rod and the bushing ,  The "splayed" shape is to help spread the CF out over the inner and out faces of the transom. I never considered them large. They are just what they are. They are certainly not a component we would want to go light on. Working in CF gives us design options you would not have in stainless. 

44884300475_fddd088dfb_k.jpg006 by robert perry, on Flickr

I was hoping to get a quick explanation for the bracket-in-a-bracket config for the Watt&Sea units. I've been considering

them for a while and have shared anchorages with other boats that have them. Two have ripped entirely off the boats they

were on - and survived. What is going on with these mounts? Angle change? Offset further aft?

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2 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Bob, in the case of Restive, the original owner, a close friend, says he spent well over a month and 6 iterations going back and forth  with Niels Helleberg to get the bow profile just right to HIS eye, and to get it properly balanced with the stern overhang. To my eye as well, it works perfectly.  

It was his second custom build with Helleberg, after doing two customs with Aage Nielsen.  For the first few years of our friendship, while I had the Hinckley, he was constantly on me to do a custom of my own, he says it's the most fun he's ever had with money.  Mr. Bottles, it seems, would probably agree.

Yes Mr. Loser, maybe the most fun I have ever had spending money was doing the Sliver project with Bob.

(Being descendent from Scot Highlanders I generally don’t like spending money, but spent on boats; well it just seems right.)

As an aside, I wonder if some of the Bob detractors actually ever met him if they would change their perception of him. I certainly don’t always agree with him on everything, but I find him a very nice decent genuine fellow whose company I very much enjoy. Much of the negative things said about him on SA simply does not match up with the person I know quite well.

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2 hours ago, kimbottles said:

As an aside, I wonder if some of the Bob detractors actually ever met him if they would change their perception of him. I certainly don’t always agree with him on everything, but I find him a very nice decent genuine fellow whose company I very much enjoy. Much of the negative things said about him on SA simply does not match up with the person I know quite well.

I was thinking of starting a CoolBob's To Admire thread just to completely trigger J6.

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I think it might be best if we all resist the temptation to complain about other people's posts.  A better approach might be to post something relevant to the topic of the thread that will steer the conversation in a different direction.

Can we all just get along?

 

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22 minutes ago, captain_crunch said:

I think it might be best if we all resist the temptation to complain about other people's posts.  A better approach might be to post something relevant to the topic of the thread that will steer the conversation in a different direction.

Can we all just get along?

image.png.cf9d1c3486ee22c9758930bf5161a371.png

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I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24".

I liked the composition of the photo, but I thought the colors were a little washed out, so I "warmed" it up. I changed the sail number of the boat on the right. Can you guess why? :D

The main things left to paint are the rest of the sails, the crew in the cockpits, touching up the water, and then "suggesting" the hardware and rigging.

image.png.93614c994acff668b865b66ff5ef02bd.png

image.png.dda47bf286b416d8c55fa5a9f8fd6191.png

image.png.b1135882332ad97a1a5277a4607b2b78.png

image.png.c6b291162297e63bd4001acf8bc21d14.png

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24".

I liked the composition of the photo, but I thought the colors were a little washed out, so I "warmed" it up. I changed the sail number of the boat on the right. Can you guess why? :D

The main things left to paint are the rest of the sails, the crew in the cockpits, touching up the water, and then "suggesting" the hardware and rigging.

image.png.93614c994acff668b865b66ff5ef02bd.png

image.png.dda47bf286b416d8c55fa5a9f8fd6191.png

image.png.b1135882332ad97a1a5277a4607b2b78.png

image.png.c6b291162297e63bd4001acf8bc21d14.png

That is a beautiful painting, it really captures the graceful proportions and sense of motion...... generally they have a bit more fuss in the wake coming off the rudder, but that may be picking a bit too fine a nit. I love the shading on the sails.

Personal note: I sailed S-boats with my grandfather, and I have struggled to resist the temptation to buy one myself. They're beautiful thoroughbreds

FB- Doug

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15 hours ago, Jammer Six said:

Then you're not paying attention.

Hi Jammer,

You are opposing everyone - difficult position. Without any malice, do you have anything to you really want to say?

I have been following you, it is somewhat hard to understand what you do want to say.

Could you just try to come to the core of this? Not the BP thing - but all of it, I mean you can't oppose evcery thing, can you?

Myself, I always like those  who have a good argument, even if it isn't mainstrream.

//J

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Neat view of the progression Bull - I always wonder how many 'layers' there are we don't really see in the final versions.

As for J6's angst,  dude,  one really does get the impression that "Thou doth protesteth too much"  just hit the down key and skip him,  or put him on ignore and get on with yer life for Pete's sake.

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4 minutes ago, Jaramaz said:

Hi Jammer,

You are opposing everyone - difficult position. Without any malice, do you have anything to you really want to say?

I have been following you, it is somewhat hard to understand what you do want to say.

Could you just try to come to the core of this? Not the BP thing - but all of it, I mean you can't oppose evcery thing, can you?

Myself, I always like those  who have a good argument, even if it isn't mainstrream.

//J

Jammer has been outed as a total troll on several other forums. He has nothing of worth to say.

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3 minutes ago, Jaramaz said:

Myself, I always like those  who have a good argument, even if it isn't mainstrream.

//J

In that case you should put the fool on ignore like most of us have.

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49 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

In that case you should put the fool on ignore like most of us have.

Reluctant to ignore. Yes, Jammer has been ... difficult.  But let'sgive him ethe opportunity to state what he actually want. 

//J

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9 minutes ago, Jaramaz said:

Reluctant to ignore. Yes, Jammer has been ... difficult.  But let'sgive him ethe opportunity to state what he actually want. 

//J

We did - a couple of years ago.

He's got nuthin.

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7 minutes ago, ProaSailor said:

http://brooklinboatyard.com/blackfish/

BLACKFISH Specifications
Designer: Jim Taylor
LOA: 49'
LWL: 35.1'
Beam: 11.6'
Draft: 7.8'
Displ: 16500 lbs
Ballast: 6830 lbs
Main: 560 sq. ft.
100% Fore Triangle: 413 sq. ft.
Total Sail Area: 973 sq. ft.

Short waterline for its length but looks great.

 A few feet of waterline is a pretty fair tradeoff for that much extra beauty IMO.

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16 minutes ago, ProaSailor said:

http://brooklinboatyard.com/blackfish/

BLACKFISH Specifications
Designer: Jim Taylor
LOA: 49'
LWL: 35.1'
Beam: 11.6'
Draft: 7.8'
Displ: 16500 lbs
Ballast: 6830 lbs
Main: 560 sq. ft.
100% Fore Triangle: 413 sq. ft.
Total Sail Area: 973 sq. ft.

Short waterline for its length but looks great.

And sails really well. She weighs 1/2 of my boat and just accelerates  like crazy. I've had drinks with the owner and his wife, super nice people.

Brooklin also builds an Eggemoggin 47, weighs even less, about 10,500# with an interior best described as vestigial, but is just a shitload of fun to sail. I'm not sure I've ever had more fun at a wheel.

i think an S-boat bumped her (Blackfish) at the Newport Panerai race last summer. 

The closer you get, the better she looks. Incredible detailing.

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8 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

And sails really well. She weighs 1/2 of my boat and just accelerates  like crazy. I've had drinks with the owner and his wife, super nice people.

Brooklin also builds an Eggemoggin 47, weighs even less, about 10,500# with an interior best described as vestigial, but is just a shitload of fun to sail. I'm not sure I've ever had more fun at a wheel.

i think an S-boat bumped her (Blackfish) at the Newport Panerai race last summer. 

The closer you get, the better she looks. Incredible detailing.

Yeah, the waterline length isn't bad at all considering the surprisingly light displacement.  And the detailing is beautiful.  This yard is building very cool boats.

P.S.  Here's the Eggemoggin 47: http://brooklinboatyard.com/eggemoggin-47/

Eggemoggin 47 Specifications
LOA: 47' 6"
Beam: 9' 0"
LWL: 34' 6"
Maximum Draft: 7' 6"
Displacement: 1000 lbs (half load)
Propulsion: 29hp Yanmar diesel saildrive

Eggemoggin47.thumb.jpg.211ca60f3d689116d66b016118aa2051.jpg

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2 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

That is a beautiful painting, it really captures the graceful proportions and sense of motion...... generally they have a bit more fuss in the wake coming off the rudder, but that may be picking a bit too fine a nit. I love the shading on the sails.

Personal note: I sailed S-boats with my grandfather, and I have struggled to resist the temptation to buy one myself. They're beautiful thoroughbreds

FB- Doug

Thanks, Steam. Remember it's not finished yet! ^_^

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1 hour ago, Great Red Shark said:

Neat view of the progression Bull - I always wonder how many 'layers' there are we don't really see in the final versions.

Thanks. Oil paint takes a while to dry. Sometimes it can slow you down. On the other hand, if you've made a mess of part of the painting, you can easily scrape it off, something I do on a regular basis.

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4 hours ago, Bull City said:

I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24".

I liked the composition of the photo, but I thought the colors were a little washed out, so I "warmed" it up. I changed the sail number of the boat on the right. Can you guess why? :D

The main things left to paint are the rest of the sails, the crew in the cockpits, touching up the water, and then "suggesting" the hardware and rigging.

image.png.93614c994acff668b865b66ff5ef02bd.png

image.png.dda47bf286b416d8c55fa5a9f8fd6191.png

image.png.b1135882332ad97a1a5277a4607b2b78.png

image.png.c6b291162297e63bd4001acf8bc21d14.png

Very nice, Mr. City!

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3 hours ago, ProaSailor said:

http://brooklinboatyard.com/blackfish/

BLACKFISH Specifications
Designer: Jim Taylor
LOA: 49'
LWL: 35.1'
Beam: 11.6'
Draft: 7.8'
Displ: 16500 lbs
Ballast: 6830 lbs
Main: 560 sq. ft.
100% Fore Triangle: 413 sq. ft.
Total Sail Area: 973 sq. ft.

Short waterline for its length but looks great.

Didn't notice first time, at about 5 seconds,  in the second still shot,  that's my boat to the left side of screen. 

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7 hours ago, Bull City said:

I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24".

I liked the composition of the photo, but I thought the colors were a little washed out, so I "warmed" it up. I changed the sail number of the boat on the right. Can you guess why? :D

The main things left to paint are the rest of the sails, the crew in the cockpits, touching up the water, and then "suggesting" the hardware and rigging.

image.png.93614c994acff668b865b66ff5ef02bd.png

image.png.dda47bf286b416d8c55fa5a9f8fd6191.png

image.png.b1135882332ad97a1a5277a4607b2b78.png

image.png.c6b291162297e63bd4001acf8bc21d14.png

It's interesting that in the early stages it looks like they are sailing in front of a rocky headland and then it morphs into forest. :D

Bull - have you tried acrylics?

My mom used oil until she discovered acrylics and never went back - you can get the textural benefits of oils without the troubles.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Bull - have you tried acrylics?

My mom used oil until she discovered acrylics and never went back - you can get the textural benefits of oils without the troubles.

Jon, I like oils. Acrylics dry pretty fast. With oils, you're not rushed. I like that. Also, oils have the aroma of linseed oil, which I find very pleasant.

Paintings usually divide themselves into one or more sessions. You do the dark areas first, with thinner texture, and lightest areas last, with a thicker texture. I like to let them dry between sessions, so they don't get mudded up, and so I can think about the next session. I usually try to have a couple of paintings going at the same time, so while one is drying, I can work on the other.

So I guess the answer is no, I haven't tried acrylics.

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11 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Mr. City:

Are you saying you have to let each color dry completely before putting any other color next to it?

It depends on the painter, their dexterity, and what they're painting. Sometimes a little bleeding or blending of adjacent colors is good, like "sky holes" in trees or a distant horizon. Sometimes it's not, like a sharp shadow line. After a while you figure out when you should let something dry.  

Then there are places where you are adding details on top of paint. An example wood be a wooded background, where you start with a very dark area, and build it up with lighter colored details on top of the dark paint. I have better results when I let the dark area dry for a day or so.

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Thanks Mr. City. I can imagine that it may draw the process out quite a bit. Do you ever use a hair dryer? I see water colorists often do.

My wife has been buying me painting supplies for years and coaxing me to try it. The whole thing intimidates me. I enjoy watching your progress.

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Anyone know anything about this boat?

Saint Barbara was designed by navel architect Eric Sponberg and custom built by Van Dam Custom boats in Boyne City Michigan. The build was started in 2004 and completed in 2007. The boat is designed with a fairly narrow beam and long water line with a narrow entry angle. The sail area, rudder, and keel are all high aspect ratio. Coupled with a long water line and narrow beam makes for an upwind machine! The mast is free standing and rotating with runners used for hard to windward in strong winds. The jib is sheeted out on a rotating jib boom. So, the main and jib can be sheeted together for any apparent wind angle. The main effectively pumps wind over the jib (upwash) and the sail plan is very powerful. The boat can close reach to broad reach achieving 10-11 knots on auto pilot. Because of the very low VCG ( 24 inches below the water line ) and hull geometry the boat maintains speed even with large angles of heal with next to no quarter wave build up. Water ballast reduces heal angle by about six degrees. The angle of positive stability is close to 180 degrees. There is no pitching rhythm (hobby horsing). Center of buoyancy and center of flotation are in near perfect alignment. Since there is no aft stay coupled with a free standing mast there really isn't much tendency to round up in a strong gust and the boat remains very docile. The reason is because the mast combined with full batten main bleeds off the energy. This same effect gives the boat very good acceleration. The most important feature is the ability to align the wind power resultant along the axis of the boat. An example is sheeting out the boom and jib on a broad reach past the center line. The boat is primarily designed for single handed or double handing. All control lines and hydraulics can be adjusted while managing the rudder. This is a one-of-a kind boat that really needs to be seen to be appreciated. She is a hoot to sail and surely won't disappoint.

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2007/vandam-custom-38-2746063/?refSource=standard listing

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1 minute ago, Bob Perry said:

Southern:

Eric Sponberg is not a designer who's work I admire. Draw up a list of his successful designs.

I've only heard the name in passing.   The broker description is original.

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21 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Anyone know anything about this boat?

...

 

Well as soon as Bob has finished studying the Herreshorff designs that MauiPunter posted the link to, surely the maestro will scoot over to Eric Sponberg’s site to learn more about this boat.

It sounds like there was heavy client involvement in the 11+ year process...

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1 hour ago, southerncross said:

Anyone know anything about this boat?

Saint Barbara was designed by navel architect Eric Sponberg and custom built by Van Dam Custom boats in Boyne City Michigan. The build was started in 2004 and completed in 2007. The boat is designed with a fairly narrow beam and long water line with a narrow entry angle. The sail area, rudder, and keel are all high aspect ratio. Coupled with a long water line and narrow beam makes for an upwind machine! The mast is free standing and rotating with runners used for hard to windward in strong winds. The jib is sheeted out on a rotating jib boom. So, the main and jib can be sheeted together for any apparent wind angle. The main effectively pumps wind over the jib (upwash) and the sail plan is very powerful. The boat can close reach to broad reach achieving 10-11 knots on auto pilot. Because of the very low VCG ( 24 inches below the water line ) and hull geometry the boat maintains speed even with large angles of heal with next to no quarter wave build up. Water ballast reduces heal angle by about six degrees. The angle of positive stability is close to 180 degrees. There is no pitching rhythm (hobby horsing). Center of buoyancy and center of flotation are in near perfect alignment. Since there is no aft stay coupled with a free standing mast there really isn't much tendency to round up in a strong gust and the boat remains very docile. The reason is because the mast combined with full batten main bleeds off the energy. This same effect gives the boat very good acceleration. The most important feature is the ability to align the wind power resultant along the axis of the boat. An example is sheeting out the boom and jib on a broad reach past the center line. The boat is primarily designed for single handed or double handing. All control lines and hydraulics can be adjusted while managing the rudder. This is a one-of-a kind boat that really needs to be seen to be appreciated. She is a hoot to sail and surely won't disappoint.

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2007/vandam-custom-38-2746063/?refSource=standard listing

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https://www.ericwsponberg.com/boat-designs/saint-barbara/

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Words of wisdom:

SO YOU WANT TO BE A BOAT DESIGNER….?
https://www.ericwsponberg.com/wp-content/uploads/so-you-want-to-be-a-boat-designer.pdf

He's no dummy: https://www.ericwsponberg.com/articles/

https://www.jacobadoram.com/thedesign/
Ocean Rowboat: "The Mission:  Complete the first solo, non-stop, unsupported ocean row from Neah Bay, WA to Cairns, Australia."

Quote

The boat was designed by professional naval architect Eric Sponberg.  His efforts were featured in Professional Boatbuilder Magazine, Issue #161, June/July 2016.  In the article, he recounts the many challenges and considerations when developing the architectural plans for the boat.  It's an excellent article and that provides the readers with a well rounded view of the design choices.  Below the article you'll find a short biography of Eric and a link to his personal website.  

 

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39 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

Southern:

Eric Sponberg is not a designer who's work I admire. Draw up a list of his successful designs.

He certainly holds his design services in high regard. I see him advertise on many forums and design sites. His mobos look good to me but his sailboats-including the one above say nothing to me. The ametuer forum guys are more likely to look to him for advice.

I don’t understand why anyone would want the coamings on the boat below. 

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Finish of the Herreshoff S Class 75th Anniversary Regatta, August 27, 1994, off Bristol, RI. This is in our dining room in Midland, TX. I was on the winning boat that year, my mom, the artist, was on a spectator boat. and took the crappy,faded, old photo it's based on. 

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21 hours ago, ProaSailor said:

Yeah, the waterline length isn't bad at all considering the surprisingly light displacement.  And the detailing is beautiful.  This yard is building very cool boats.

P.S.  Here's the Eggemoggin 47: http://brooklinboatyard.com/eggemoggin-47/

Eggemoggin 47 Specifications
LOA: 47' 6"
Beam: 9' 0"
LWL: 34' 6"
Maximum Draft: 7' 6"
Displacement: 1000 lbs (half load)
Propulsion: 29hp Yanmar diesel saildrive

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There are advantages to keeping a boat in Brooklin, such as being invited to drive someone else's Eggemoggin 47. This one is fitted with removable lifelines and stanchions. The stanchions just unscrew from threaded sockets. 

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