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Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Does it come with a codpiece?  And I can easily singlehand or cruise with the wife and no crew. I say that a lot when I see an exotic, beautiful car, or a mansion that is just too f'n big

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On 3/25/2019 at 3:01 PM, fufkin said:

Here's a daysailer that takes a little bit more of a modern, racy approach to cockpit design. There are variations on the traveller design. There would be no problem putting some custom padding along the coaming/seating. I'm willing to bet everything's in the right place on this, to me, very cool boat to admire.image.thumb.jpeg.7588ed4926efb349a49d50bf71e079c4.jpeg

In the photo below, I guess the Maxi Dolphin guys have penned in an area behind the tiller, presumably for at least one, maybe two Italian bronze beauties to stretch out and tan, behind and away from the action of the daysailing. 

image.thumb.jpeg.91af6814e599a87b23321f6b50037094.jpeg

 

And here's a listing if you want to see more lines. I've tried unsuccessfully to find a bad angle.

https://www.davidwaltersyachts.com/Sail/33-Maxi-Dolphin-2007/611

The big Viriella ( 115' )

Viriella.jpg

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13 hours ago, Dilligaf0220 said:

Yup all sail handling is from the cockpit.

Offsets be damned!

 

6911647_20181117183732381_1_XLARGE-980x6

So you are standing in the middle of the cockpit to operate stuff, very safe, you have to imagine that reef, tack or gybe at 3am under driving rain! Also no genoa to eventually shape itself like a potato bag, no pole to deal with, no shrouds to catch the sail after a gybe. Apart from lasers I've never really sailed catboats but I think that it makes a lot of sense for a bluewater cruiser. Genoa and spinnakers are exciting on  a racing boat and I have fond memories of tricky operations racing boats close to their limits but IMHO it is just cumbersome if it is just your wife and you manning the boat. Pulling a few strings from the cockpit is the way to go. Cruisers are different beasts, people shouldn't be afraid to deviate from the norm.

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2 hours ago, Panoramix said:
16 hours ago, Dilligaf0220 said:

Yup all sail handling is from the cockpit.

Offsets be damned!

 

6911647_20181117183732381_1_XLARGE-980x6

So you are standing in the middle of the cockpit to operate stuff, very safe, you have to imagine that reef, tack or gybe at 3am under driving rain! Also no genoa to eventually shape itself like a potato bag, no pole to deal with, no shrouds to catch the sail after a gybe. Apart from lasers I've never really sailed catboats but I think that it makes a lot of sense for a bluewater cruiser. Genoa and spinnakers are exciting on  a racing boat and I have fond memories of tricky operations racing boats close to their limits but IMHO it is just cumbersome if it is just your wife and you manning the boat. Pulling a few strings from the cockpit is the way to go. Cruisers are different beasts, people shouldn't be afraid to deviate from the norm.

Looks great in principle but the execution is wanting. I'm not a big fan of that wide clutch bank so close to the winch and those turning blocks at the base of the mast could stand an upgrade. There's a lot of friction that could be eliminated and a lot of line coils that want to live on top of those instruments.

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1 hour ago, IStream said:

Looks great in principle but the execution is wanting. I'm not a big fan of that wide clutch bank so close to the winch and those turning blocks at the base of the mast could stand an upgrade. There's a lot of friction that could be eliminated and a lot of line coils that want to live on top of those instruments.

Yes but that's easy to fix! TBH if it was my boat I would probably reorganise a bit the cockpit, starting by deciding if it is possible (or not) to replace the wheel by a tiller to gain space and let the helmsman operate stuff easily, then I would try to make sure that the sheets are really accesible!

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Anyone remember the Nonsuch 30 that lost a mast and was abandoned somewhere in the middle of the Atlantic only to wash up on some Central/South American shore many months later?

...as for no headsail being a benefit??...come on guys lift a finger...a furling headsail is probably the biggest 'trim for comfort' tool ever gifted to the avg cruiser. When sailing w a reefed  main, just the right amount of jib can really steady a boat when the going gets rough...

....that said, the Nonsuch 26 might be the ultimate pocket cruiser(coastal that is)

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7 minutes ago, fufkin said:

Anyone remember the Nonsuch 30 that lost a mast and was abandoned somewhere in the middle of the Atlantic only to wash up on some Central/South American shore many months later?

...as for no headsail being a benefit??...come on guys lift a finger...a furling headsail is probably the biggest 'trim for comfort' tool ever gifted to the avg cruiser. When sailing w a reefed  main, just the right amount of jib can really steady a boat when the going gets rough...

 

Not when said headsail is poled out and you need to gybe asap as some tanker insist on being on the same spot as you in 10 minutes. Not when you need to tack every 5 or 10 minutes because you are sailing up or down a relatively narrow gulf or estuary. As for trim for comfort of a marconi sail, that is what kickers are for!

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42 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

Not when said headsail is poled out and you need to gybe asap as some tanker insist on being on the same spot as you in 10 minutes. Not when you need to tack every 5 or 10 minutes because you are sailing up or down a relatively narrow gulf or estuary. As for trim for comfort of a marconi sail, that is what kickers are for!

Tacking up a channel.?  I'd guess, all things being equal, a sloop points higher than a cat boat. What's the big hassle w tacking w a headsail anyway? It's one extra string. 

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22 hours ago, Dilligaf0220 said:

Yup all sail handling is from the cockpit.

Offsets be damned!

 

6911647_20181117183732381_1_XLARGE-980x6

They made one cutter version of this boat (stayed mast). We came very, very close to buying it on three occasions but the selling broker and/or owner get moving the goal posts. We had verbal agreements each time and when it came down to putting things on paper it fell apart. Would have been the boat be did a loop in rather than our Bristol 45.5.

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1 hour ago, fufkin said:

Tacking up a channel.?  I'd guess, all things being equal, a sloop points higher than a cat boat. What's the big hassle w tacking w a headsail anyway? It's one extra string. 

Had a Nonsuch 30 for several years. We would routinely tack up the narrow channel into our harbour. It does not point as high as a decent sloop but doing an extra tack or two is not a problem. No strings to pull is way better than one strong to pull.

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6 minutes ago, Bull City said:

I'm not so sure about those wide clip-on suspenders.

In a few more years and you’ll be at the age to be wearing them for everyday wear!

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45 minutes ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

Had a Nonsuch 30 for several years. We would routinely tack up the narrow channel into our harbour. It does not point as high as a decent sloop but doing an extra tack or two is not a problem. No strings to pull is way better than one strong to pull.

Bristol,

Don't get me wrong. The Nonsuch 30 is a great boat, and the performance might surprise some. I remember, as a kid, seeing hull no. 1, hot off the press. It turned into one of the more successful designs that I can think of.

...as for less strings, I know of at least a couple of highly experienced racers who use them as family trucksters...why pull too many strings when that's their day job type of thinking....and for the family you get way more room than the avg 30 footer.

....but let me throw a couple of wild guesses your way.

I'll bet you were around when the Nonsuch came of age on L Ontario. I'd also bet you were one of the many happy and satisfied owners of this wildly successful design and sailed it safely and successfully for a good stretch.

The last hunch I've got is that when it came time for your fantastic voyage (congrats on that by the way!!) you needed something a little bit more 'blue water'. 

Am I in the ballpark?

 

edit: just read your post about the stayed mast version...that was part of my hunch...

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1 hour ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

They made one cutter version of this boat (stayed mast). We came very, very close to buying it on three occasions but the selling broker and/or owner get moving the goal posts. We had verbal agreements each time and when it came down to putting things on paper it fell apart. Would have been the boat be did a loop in rather than our Bristol 45.5.

This must be the cutter then because the mast is stepped through the cabinhouse. I only seen them with the mast way up nearly to the stem.

Image result for nonsuch 30 cutter

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32 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

This must be the cutter then because the mast is stepped through the cabinhouse. I only seen them with the mast way up nearly to the stem.

Image result for nonsuch 30 cutter

That looks like a Nonsuch 36 to my eye. BTW, I would not have chosen the Nereus cat ketch for crossing oceans. When I think back to the passage from Mauritius to Richards Bay, SA I would want to have a very solid boat. We had 30 to 45 knots for several days. Either Nereus (catch ketch or cutter) would be fine for most of a row.

This is the Nereus cutter. I see that it Is for sale. The price is silly to me at $229k. It was about $70k cheaper 12 years ago. Can't imagine what was done to it to justify that. It may be just that they can say that it is only one of its kind. The ad says it was built by Swiftsure Yachts. It was built in Taiwan at a top yard that only makes big power yachts now.

image.png.9930466aad8121c066da8619e21ee6c6.png

image.png.424bd51c08bd79604e69ec95e39b2a6d.png

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I was doing a loop around Palos Verdes on the road bike and decided to drop in at Cabrillo and indulge one of my favorite pastimes, perusing the local marina for local talent (boats that is).

Spotted this.  Anyone know what it is?

36D56E90-B46C-4422-9C74-909F816E5433.jpeg

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41 minutes ago, viktor said:

Could it be this one? Bonnie Dune, designed by Gene Wells,  might have been built or restored at Chapman Boat Yard.  

bommie dune.jpg

https://m.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.1219091574770882.1073741878.146095252070525&type=3

Also a 1955 Transpac Veteran

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In 2009, Mrs. Bull (oxymoron?) and I fulfilled an old wish, and went on a 5-day Windjammer Cruise out of Camden, Maine. We had a blast. Along the way, we were subjected to some outstanding eye-candy. Here are a couple of lovely "little" schooners in Camden, Surprise and Olad. I didn't know about the dangers of off-set companionways then. In fact, the Mercantile, the schooner we sailed on, had a few of them too. In retrospect, I don't know how they got their Coast Guard approval to carry unwitting passengers. I suppose I'm lucky to be here to share these photos.

IMG_0631.JPG.thumb.jpg.670ad03e4fd0f0c0e026303bde3b99c9.jpg

IMG_0626.JPG.thumb.jpg.a29ca3c102b7bd5cf7808592bf597a84.jpg

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IMG_0628.JPG.thumb.jpg.bc863a93c14d3b312017fd996a3d6f06.jpg

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23 hours ago, fufkin said:

Tacking up a channel.?  I'd guess, all things being equal, a sloop points higher than a cat boat. What's the big hassle w tacking w a headsail anyway? It's one extra string. 

One extra string is a huge step from zero. However you look at it, tacking a genoa of a 40 footer 10 times is hard work.

As for pointing higher on a bluewater cruising boat it isn't that important as anyway you tend to foot off on a cruiser offshore.

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20 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

That looks like a Nonsuch 36 to my eye. BTW, I would not have chosen the Nereus cat ketch for crossing oceans. When I think back to the passage from Mauritius to Richards Bay, SA I would want to have a very solid boat. We had 30 to 45 knots for several days. Either Nereus (catch ketch or cutter) would be fine for most of a row.

This is the Nereus cutter. I see that it Is for sale. The price is silly to me at $229k. It was about $70k cheaper 12 years ago. Can't imagine what was done to it to justify that. It may be just that they can say that it is only one of its kind. The ad says it was built by Swiftsure Yachts. It was built in Taiwan at a top yard that only makes big power yachts now.

image.png.9930466aad8121c066da8619e21ee6c6.png

image.png.424bd51c08bd79604e69ec95e39b2a6d.png

The ports on the cabin are the giveaway, That's a Nonsuch 33 with 3 ports, N36's have 4.

The Nereus/Sequoia/Nonsuch 40's had their hulls built in Taiwan, but were fitted out/finished in Ontario, Canada by Wiggers.

And from everything I've heard 3rd hand, pretty much every owner of that cutter rigged N40 has been a pill to deal with.  And it still couldn't sail as close to the wind as a well sailed N33.

 

Just as a glib shoutout for sweetwater sailors, both the Nonsuch and the Laser were conceived around the same areas on Lake Ontario.  And really should at this point put to the rest the misconceptions of a cat rigged boats "pointing ability".

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2 hours ago, paps49 said:

I stumbled on this today, I think it's the most beautiful thing I've ever seen.

http://www.pagetraditionalboats.com/burma.htm

1AE7.jpg

And it even has a canon. Shoot those jet skis right off the water. Good find @paps49.

Cheers

Jim

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18 minutes ago, Mr. Ed said:

Wtf

 have you been at the photoshop again? That can’t be real. 

Dorades look like periscopes??

And the compass placement?  If that’s a compass.  Never seen one mounted that way.

Nice looking boat but odd mixture of hardware.

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There was a winch like that, thou not as large, on the old Herreshoff that my Dad chartered  for us on the east coast back in the 50s. I can't recall what model Herreshoff design it was. Did he design a Fisher Island class? That seems to ring a bell.

Proxy.jpg

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http://www.sandemanyachtcompany.co.uk/yacht/460/herreshoff-fishers-island-31-43-ft-sloop-1929                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Found it. Fishers Island 31. What wonderful times those were for a 9yr old kid.   

IMG_0016-001.jpg

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15 minutes ago, viktor said:

http://www.sandemanyachtcompany.co.uk/yacht/460/herreshoff-fishers-island-31-43-ft-sloop-1929                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Found it. Fishers Island 31. What wonderful times those were for a 9yr old kid.   

IMG_0016-001.jpg

Interesting chapeau on your dad.

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Zwerver the original ketch build started 1939 completed 1945 now a sloop listed for sale.

http://www.sandemanyachtcompany.co.uk/yacht/210/Sparkman-&-Stephens-60-ft-Sloop-1939

C6A2F8DD-10E3-451B-A0AE-782663DF59BB.jpeg.bf158ecf3f27b0e96832c68d5ed4eb7a.jpeg

Zwerver II 1957 tiller steered.

1961 Fastnet winner.

Angle iron frames set out during build.

Mahogany planked now splined and glassed.

She has the monster aft bronze winch.

BF2A3C6C-955C-468C-A4B0-23946D1AB486.thumb.jpeg.0c6f76e07147db09d250d71b76e9892c.jpeg

 

 

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Olin Stephens at his most artistic.

Those flush deck & small doghouse boats he drew back then have always been my very favourite looking boats. Zwerver, Baruna, Gesture - there were lots of them, all heartbreakingly gorgeous.

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35 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Olin Stephens at his most artistic.

Those flush deck & small doghouse boats he drew back then have always been my very favourite looking boats. Zwerver, Baruna, Gesture - there were lots of them, all heartbreakingly gorgeous.

Could be Bill Tripp took some inspiration as well?

2ECD1AF9-39CD-4770-9B53-5EA694E032BD.jpeg

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15 hours ago, Priscilla said:

Zwerver the original ketch build started 1939 completed 1945 now a sloop listed for sale.

http://www.sandemanyachtcompany.co.uk/yacht/210/Sparkman-&-Stephens-60-ft-Sloop-1939

C6A2F8DD-10E3-451B-A0AE-782663DF59BB.jpeg.bf158ecf3f27b0e96832c68d5ed4eb7a.jpeg

Zwerver II 1957 tiller steered.

1961 Fastnet winner.

Angle iron frames set out during build.

Mahogany planked now splined and glassed.

She has the monster aft bronze winch.

BF2A3C6C-955C-468C-A4B0-23946D1AB486.thumb.jpeg.0c6f76e07147db09d250d71b76e9892c.jpeg

 

 

 

Very beautiful boats the both of them, even though I don't get the winch positioning!

 

 

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1 hour ago, Mr. Ed said:

Very beautiful boats the both of them, even though I don't get the winch positioning!

+1 or -1, I'm not sure, but I don't either.

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15 hours ago, southerncross said:

Could be Bill Tripp took some inspiration as well?

2ECD1AF9-39CD-4770-9B53-5EA694E032BD.jpeg

On the roof may be but Olin Stephen's boat doesn't neglect waterline length.

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LEGENDARY HERRESHOFF VAGRANT

The classic 39m / 128ft schooner – launched in 1913 – will be rebuilt completely by Royal Huisman’s dedicated refit department.

Herreshoff’s legacy has fascinated yachting lovers for more than a century. Vagrant’s owner – well aware of the yacht’s history – clearly briefed Team Huisfit to reconstruct Vagrant’s magnificent grace and style, inside and out, with the utmost respect and care for her historic value, but also to re-engineer her with the most modern quality materials and board systems for sensible, effortless and safe operation. With this extensive Huisfit, Vagrant and her magnitude will be preserved well into the future.

Vagrant arrived at the Royal Huisman facilities in Vollenhove where the yacht will be fully stripped. The rebuild will begin with the sandblasting and preservation of her 33m / 109ft over-a-hundred-years-old steel hull, after which a new deck and all necessary outfitting will be re-installed.

Dykstra Naval Architects and Rondal will provide the re-rigging of her schooner-rigged sail plan with yankee, staysail, main staysail and queen fisherman, while new Rondal aluminum masts will be constructed for the inside furling of the fisherman and mainsail.

The luxury owner’s and guest accommodation will be refurbished, whilst new crew’s quarters are created in Royal Huisman’s joinery. Without compromising on space the engine, generators, heating, air conditioning and more will be smartly concealed behind wooden panels and cabinetry.

Thanks to her owner’s vision and respect for her legacy Vagrant will not become a piece of forgotten history but instead, will remain a living legend – sailing and enjoyed by many for decades to come.
The rebuild of Vagrant is scheduled for delivery in 2019.

Schooner VAGRANT
Designer: Herreshoff
Construction: Steel
Launched: 1913 (Rhode island, USA)
Refit: 2017-2019 (Huisfit)
Length incl. bowsprit: 39m / 129ft
Hull length: 33m / 109ft
Length waterline: 25m / 82ft
Beam: 7m / 24ft
Draft: 4m / 14ft

Expertise à la carte
Huisfit, Royal Huisman’s dedicated refit department, offers everything from cosmetic repairs to hull and interior modifications, machinery, systems and rig overhauls, the updating of electrics and electronics, and more, including the necessary in-house design to support these services. A Huisfit carries with it the assurance of a “better than new” result. Team Huisfit will be represented at the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show, with pleasure we invite you to our stand at the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show, 1 – 5 November 2017. Royal Huisman will be at “The Superyacht Life” area overlooking the inter-coastal waterway at the Swimming Hall of Fame.

From Scuttlebut

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16 hours ago, SpongeDeckSquareFoil said:

That is a very nice pic. Sweet looking boats.

Bonus points for the correct use of bull rails; as mounting surface for cleats.

@SpongeDeckSquareFoil. That is blasphemy I say. Evil mounted on the shoulders of all things good.
All Hail the Mighty and Good Bull Rail
Brother James

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19 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Yeah it does - it's just got a big stern wave in that pic.

Those boats in the 30's all had lots of overhang.

image.png.98d2b1a955f44c9312eb1fa4b274fd20.png

Not this one :

IMG_1659+copie.jpg

This boat has been sailing around Brittany for a long time and it is really beautiful, it's got some overhang but nowhere as much as the usual suspects.

 

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2 hours ago, Panoramix said:

This boat has been sailing around Brittany for a long time and it is really beautiful, it's got some overhang but nowhere as much as the usual suspects.

Insert Purple Font. Must be of French design. 

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37 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

The blue boat above must loose about a quarter of it's length in overhangs, not so much for the sparkmans and Stephens boat.

I reckon the S&S boat is about 29% overhang and the Tripp boat is about 35%. I’m always surprised by how relatively short the lwl is on any sort of Olde Worlde yott. 

Our genuine-style fake vessel (real wood!) is only 24% by those measurements as long as you ignore the kebab stick. 

Classic_14_AA_DSC_8598.jpglines-lines-lines.jpg

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One of the most artistic of the British designers - his boats were always very good looking.

He lived in an age when it must have been very difficult being gay.

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11 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

I reckon the S&S boat is about 29% overhang and the Tripp boat is about 35%. I’m always surprised by how relatively short the lwl is on any sort of Olde Worlde yott. 

Our genuine-style fake vessel (real wood!) is only 24% by those measurements as long as you ignore the kebab stick. 

Classic_14_AA_DSC_8598.jpglines-lines-lines.jpg

I didn't compute the exact ratio but yes there is a point where (to my eyes) it becomes a bit of a self caricature, I just like this S&S boat whereas I find these exuberant overhangs of the same era not so nice.

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15 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

He lived in an age when it must have been very difficult being gay.

Sadly very true, may well have prompted his move to Grenada.

More tellingly the Rabbi “came out” in the early 80,s which points finally to a sea change in homophobic attitudes.

Shockingly now is not the time as a gay yacht designer to hang your shingle out in Brunei.

 

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