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1 hour ago, Ishmael said:

But why is it coming up through the deck between the mast and the chainplates?

Ish, who is the new "you"?

She is exceptionally hot.

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I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

Does it come with a codpiece?  And I can easily singlehand or cruise with the wife and no crew. I say that a lot when I see an exotic, beautiful car, or a mansion that is just too f'n big

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1 minute ago, SloopJonB said:

Ish, who is the new "you"?

She is exceptionally hot.

Tina Louise, AKA Ginger on Gilligan's Island. 

Unfortunately, she got addicted to the knife in her later years and crossed way over the "aging gracefully" line and squarely into the freakshow zone.

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4 hours ago, longy said:

I think there are two tackles shown in the pic: the inboard tackle with the thru deck block leads up to an eye on deck. If you corelate the position of the two nuts (pin rail ends) and the curved deck beam which mirrors the cabin house profile it's obvious. The eyes stick up out of bronze (?) fittings both sides abeam of the mast, outboard of the coaming (?) board. The eyes are down tight to the fittings, so the underdeck tackle is two-blocked. Visible in the last pic posted. The other tackle which leads all the way forwards seem to have two different types of line thru that forward block. This I think is the runner tackle due to the length of throw. (runners have no purchase above deck, they just disappear down thru a deck hole.

Very good work Mr Long. But the inboard one? It can’t be a barber for the jib and I can’t see that it’s a dongle to alter the lead of the spinnaker sheet/guy, for it would need to be further outboard. It has a very short throw, not a powerful purchase and isn’t designed to be regularly adjusted. So it’s something that’s locked off and left.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:
7 hours ago, longy said:

I think there are two tackles shown in the pic: the inboard tackle with the thru deck block leads up to an eye on deck. If you corelate the position of the two nuts (pin rail ends) and the curved deck beam which mirrors the cabin house profile it's obvious. The eyes stick up out of bronze (?) fittings both sides abeam of the mast, outboard of the coaming (?) board. The eyes are down tight to the fittings, so the underdeck tackle is two-blocked. Visible in the last pic posted. The other tackle which leads all the way forwards seem to have two different types of line thru that forward block. This I think is the runner tackle due to the length of throw. (runners have no purchase above deck, they just disappear down thru a deck hole.

Very good work Mr Long. But the inboard one? It can’t be a barber for the jib and I can’t see that it’s a dongle to alter the lead of the spinnaker sheet/guy, for it would need to be further outboard. It has a very short throw, not a powerful purchase and isn’t designed to be regularly adjusted. So it’s something that’s locked off and left.

I thought I asked another question to which most everyone knew the answer.

I agree with longy that there are two different things. Somethings.

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6 hours ago, Priscilla said:

56860BA1-9EB7-4E73-B322-989BB1279CE5.jpeg.7a97e3e1b76d3768defda8e5f53857f1.jpeg

Nice rack and pinion quadrant.

Here is the screw versionB920BCBE-3BA6-4AF0-B9FE-DBADA86A4CDB.thumb.jpeg.f77b62b920c70ec255dcc89bb1b839d2.jpeg6ADDC4D1-4ED9-480F-B641-997FE9BB44FF.thumb.jpeg.618a93794adebf11d4c04ada04429422.jpeg

 

Work of art, IMHO

Here's a little BTW: There was a tempest in the rivet-counting teapot a few years ago, in that people who were enthusiastically interested in the Titanic, but did not have much background in maritime knowledge generally, were trying to insist that steering wheels on old ships worked backwards from the way they do now. This was presented as one reason why they crashed into the iceberg.

The fact that Edson has been in business since the late 1800s and has never built even one backwards steering system, and the USS Constitution and the HMS Victory have been around much longer than that, and -their- wheels have never been rigged to work backwards....... well, some people just have funny ideas.

FB- Doug

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2 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Work of art, IMHO

Here's a little BTW: There was a tempest in the rivet-counting teapot a few years ago, in that people who were enthusiastically interested in the Titanic, but did not have much background in maritime knowledge generally, were trying to insist that steering wheels on old ships worked backwards from the way they do now. This was presented as one reason why they crashed into the iceberg.

The fact that Edson has been in business since the late 1800s and has never built even one backwards steering system, and the USS Constitution and the HMS Victory have been around much longer than that, and -their- wheels have never been rigged to work backwards....... well, some people just have funny ideas.

FB- Doug

I had sailed only tiller-steered boats since I was a kid.  The first time I was on a wheel-steered boat, I admit that I turned the wheel "backwards" a few times before I got the hang of it.  I just bought my first wheel-steered boat in November and have yet to sail her.  My wife, who has been aboard with me on our three previous tiller steered boats for the past thirty years, keeps asking me "you do know how to work that thing, right?"  I should be insulted, right?

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20 minutes ago, Hukilau said:

My wife, who has been aboard with me on our three previous tiller steered boats for the past thirty years, keeps asking me "you do know how to work that thing, right?"  I should be insulted, right?

That depends.

Does she have a point? :D

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15 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:
38 minutes ago, Hukilau said:

My wife, who has been aboard with me on our three previous tiller steered boats for the past thirty years, keeps asking me "you do know how to work that thing, right?"  I should be insulted, right?

That depends. 

Does she have a point? :D

I can tell you as a happy newlywed of 26 years, there are two ways this conversation can go.

You either already know which way to take it, or I can't help you.

-DSK

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1 hour ago, Steam Flyer said:

I can tell you as a happy newlywed of 26 years, there are two ways this conversation can go.

You either already know which way to take it, or I can't help you.

-DSK

Yup.  Just looking for validation. 

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Hooked new wire to the quadrant but forget to cross them.  Turned the wheel left, and the boat went right.  I thought to myself (we were headed to a regatta), "I can do this.  Pretend it's a tiller."  Wise counsel had me get to the turning basin, turn around and park the boat to fix the matter.  I still think I could've done it.  But it would have been really stupid.  But being stupid never stopped me before.

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13 minutes ago, Hawaiidart said:

Hooked new wire to the quadrant but forget to cross them.  Turned the wheel left, and the boat went right.  I thought to myself (we were headed to a regatta), "I can do this.  Pretend it's a tiller."  Wise counsel had me get to the turning basin, turn around and park the boat to fix the matter.  I still think I could've done it.  But it would have been really stupid.  But being stupid never stopped me before.

Just steer facing backwards. Problem solved.

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3 hours ago, Hukilau said:

I had sailed only tiller-steered boats since I was a kid.  The first time I was on a wheel-steered boat, I admit that I turned the wheel "backwards" a few times before I got the hang of it.  I just bought my first wheel-steered boat in November and have yet to sail her.  My wife, who has been aboard with me on our three previous tiller steered boats for the past thirty years, keeps asking me "you do know how to work that thing, right?"  I should be insulted, right?

 

13 minutes ago, IStream said:

Just steer facing backwards. Problem solved.

Yep- it worked just fine backing out.  I was proud of myself but the crew would have none of it.  Said something about the fact that I was bad enough steering the right way.

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25 minutes ago, Hawaiidart said:

 

Yep- it worked just fine backing out.  I was proud of myself but the crew would have none of it.  Said something about the fact that I was bad enough steering the right way.

Lash a tiller extension to the top of the wheel and you're good to go.

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Next you'll tell me that they're trying to make it possible to steer a sailboat with a joystick. Love the photo above with the engine control next to the helmsman's chair.  Just turn that seat into a barcalounger, add a built-in cooler, and you'd be all set for a good' ol time.  Have to get Cooter to trim the sails, though.  

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2 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

A whipstaff! Cool!!!

FB- Doug

Totally cool.  I’ve never seen a whipstaff on anything other than a 1600’s replica.  I’m really diggin’ the emergency tiller head under the helmsman throne too.

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On 4/17/2019 at 7:08 PM, olsurfer said:

A whipstaff is a space saver on a small boat.

whipstaff helm.jpg

I can see why it would work on a boat like that, but I don't think whipstaffs are generally "space savers" .  You still need a full size tiller for the leverage the whipstaff needs to work.  

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Not my usual kinda thing.  We call her mizzmo.  Thought it might entertain y'all for a while on a Friday afternoon.

 

file-104.jpeg

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And no she ain't that tender.  I am just apparently incompetent and can't figure out how to correct the rotation of the pic.

Oh and yes, the jib needs more outhaul... I know.

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2 hours ago, Hukilau said:

I can see why it would work on a boat like that, but I don't think whipstaffs are generally "space savers" .  You still need a full size tiller for the leverage the whipstaff needs to work.  

But a whipstaff operates in a different plane – it takes up “vertical” space rather than “horizontal”.

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33 minutes ago, Priscilla said:

8D33F6CA-2B78-41BD-B976-41A6C8E22A88.thumb.jpeg.d789e69abfe616c7c43d9d46c913a1db.jpeg

Clearly you are smarter than me!  Thank you for putting Mizzmo right side up. 

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2 hours ago, Wess said:

Clearly you are smarter than me!  Thank you for putting Mizzmo right side up. 

You had too much sail up. Release the traveler and the picture will right itself.

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2 hours ago, stumblingthunder said:
17 hours ago, IStream said:

You had too much sail up. Release the traveler and the picture will right itself.

I assumed that the boat was sailing on the equator.

- Stumbling

I guess I was exhibiting my unconscious mid-latitude bias.

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18 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I thought it was an old IOR boat when they still used the ketch rig sometimes.

Does race semi regularly but not its designed purpose. 

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3 hours ago, Wess said:

Does race semi regularly but not its designed purpose. 

IOR or racing?

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9 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:
9 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

Another picture from long ago. Probably on Long Island Sound.

Whaler Sloop.jpg

NICE!

Hull looks rather Tancook-whaler-ish?

FB- Doug

Sail trim looks mid-fucked-erish.

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On 4/19/2019 at 3:21 PM, KC375 said:

But a whipstaff operates in a different plane – it takes up “vertical” space rather than “horizontal”.

 

Yes, but the whipstaff connects to a tiller; a whipstaff does not attach directly to the rudder.  In order for the tiller to have sufficient leverage to move the rudder, it needs to be a certain length.  The whipstaffs I have seen are the same length they would be if they were on deck and controlled by hand; they are just below deck.  Are you saying that a whipstaff provides leverage on it's own, making it possible to have a shorter tiller?

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10 minutes ago, Hukilau said:

Yes, but the whipstaff connects to a tiller; a whipstaff does not attach directly to the rudder.  In order for the tiller to have sufficient leverage to move the rudder, it needs to be a certain length.  The whipstaffs I have seen are the same length they would be if they were on deck and controlled by hand; they are just below deck.  Are you saying that a whipstaff provides leverage on it's own, making it possible to have a shorter tiller?

It can...... it all depends on the ratios between the fulcrum and the two working arms. For example, you could hook a very short tiller to a long whipstaff, with the fulcrum of the whipstaff quite close to the tiller and a working end that's 2x or even 3x as long...... lots of leverage there. The geometry might be difficult to fit into a normal cockpit though.

-DSK

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10 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Sail trim looks mid-fucked-erish.

Two things about that. First, I think the camera caught them either setting or furling a roller furling headsail. She's headed high enough that the main is also luffing. Second, I don't see a boom vang. That could either be because the boat was actually built before vangs became the usual thing or because the owner is emulating the old ways.

Enlarging the picture, the emblem on the main seems to be a red fox. Google found this link. Different fox, but it looks like the same design. 

 

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1 hour ago, Sail4beer said:

It looks like this to me Kris.

Same boat and guy?

And most Pinkys are schooner rigged.

606FDB4D-1BA2-4CBB-8129-697F8A20AA96.jpeg

This pic was taken a few seconds before yours...

I took them both (and several others of the owner sailing into the harbor). I met the owner sometime later in the local hardware. I think he wrote this book on Tancook Whalers. The boat was built locally at the Rockport Apprenticeship to (according to him) plans of a pre 1900 Tancook Whaler. Here's the boat. 

41DvkYJcPOL._SY379_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg 

I don't know much about this stuff actually (who can keep it all straight?), and defer to others. Here's a favorite Pinky Schooner (I think) that sails locally (also built locally by Lance Lee of Outward Bound fame, I think). 

468704577_Pinkyschooner2.jpg.7f5f48b1d4d8031d7e1945bcc0beb6ba.jpg

And another SUMMERTIME that sails the schooner trade. 

summertime%20resized.jpg

The only difference between the Pinky's and the Whaler is the Pinky has a higher stern that comes to a stem point. The Whaler I think has a small flat stern?

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Ok, you are right about the boat and probably the photographer too! Good thing I didn’t take credit for the shot...

 

and here is the boat we may be discussing. The small bowsprit made me think Pinky.

E290F09A-8B30-4DC8-95AD-2118293366F6.jpeg

81BE04F2-641E-4400-93EF-521D251AAB8D.jpeg

BE678550-0082-40E0-AE71-9EA4C3707539.jpeg

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7 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

Link to the listing 

Happy Easter!

https://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/57026

Interestingly,  when I was a lad on the coast of Maine, late 50's early 60's, there was one that showed up in Casco Bay periodically.  Painted white and seemingly just a bit smaller.  It was a little less gawky looking than this one but may have been the same one.  At the time, it showed a homeport of Padanaram ---I'd never heard of it and thought it sounded like an exotic place of pirates and the East India company.... (who knew it was in Taxachusetts?)

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12 hours ago, Priscilla said:

We met that boats owner rowing through Center Harbor on the Eggemoggin Reach. He sailed it over from the UK, I think more than once. He was (is?) working at the Brooklin Boat Yard so he knows his stuff. Small world on the water. 

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That one is right up your alley. Look at all of the beautiful wood!

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Here is the drawing for the Brittany Class Sloop. Tiller, overhangs, narrow... what's not to like?

It looks like there is break in the deck house at the mast. What's that about?

brittany_class_drawing.thumb.jpg.93ef5f473c6b0ee446edbc945f52d246.jpg

 

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I think that pinkies have a top strake that serves as a bulwark that sweeps up past the top of the sternpost offset outboard a bit. They meet in a small 'tombstone' as Bob puts it that serves as the backrest for a very convenient toilet seat!

Pinked stern

P1435.jpg

Pinked is a corruption of pinched. As in 'go to the stern if you have to 'pinch one off'

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3 hours ago, Bull City said:

Here is the drawing for the Brittany Class Sloop. Tiller, overhangs, narrow... what's not to like?

It looks like there is break in the deck house at the mast. What's that about?

brittany_class_drawing.thumb.jpg.93ef5f473c6b0ee446edbc945f52d246.jpg

 

The mast partners in a wooden boat are much stronger if you put them at deck level, instead of at cabintop level. However, I don't see any sign of that in the video of the Brittany class sloop, or in the construction view above, so I'm not sure what's going on with those plans.

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Bull, that is a beauty --thanks for posting. Believe Giles designed the "slot" for partners for the reason given by Ismael. See design penned in 1940 and likely changed to a more conventional partners in the 20 boat production.

My uncle owned a 1939 32' Reg Freeman design with the same detail. Sold it in 1962 before purchasing a Morgan Giles West Channel Class. In the summer of 1966, Uncle taught me to sail on the West Channel Class on the River Orwell at Woolverstone. (Harwich Yacht Club) Believe a year or two later, a young Dylan Winter arrived from London to attend the Woolverstone school for boys next door.  --Small world.1532737135_GayGalliard1965848(Medium).thumb.jpg.60371cc866c96876df5a57600c2021f4.jpg

 

Gamester.jpg

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i think young Mr Perry designed his carbon cutters thus. As did Holman his Stiletto. It also allows of a nice sort of tray around the partners to catch halyards and bits of rigging falling from the mast. 

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Ismael Has it correct. The slot was to avoid having the mast go through the cabin top where they thought it could not be adequately supported. But on the carbon cutters as on many newer boats it is used as a styling feature.  I use that feature all the time on my cartoons. I like the way it looks. It does make an effective interior layout a challenge.

 

Two C F cutters

 

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Last night this Baba 40 (Airloom) was more or less keeping up with a J/109, Olson 911SE, Express 37, and other much lighter boats in a light air (5 knots and dropping) downwind leg.  They were impressive (and we weren't having a great leg).  It's pretty cool seeing how well these guys campaign a 30,000lb cruiser:

image.thumb.jpeg.a303a10243873ffdf961ce23638fc0a9.jpeg

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32,000 lbs. please. AIRLOOM has a 6' taller rig than the stock Baba 40 as does CINNAMON GIRL. I think people who disparage "full keel" boats should try sailing one of the Tashiba/Baba series boats. Maybe they could learn something.

Baba 40 racer

 

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5 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Ismael Has it correct. The slot was to avoid having the mast go through the cabin top where they thought it could not be adequately supported. But on the carbon cutters as on many newer boats it is used as a styling feature.  I use that feature all the time on my cartoons. I like the way it looks. It does make an effective interior layout a challenge.

 

Two C F cutters

 

There is also the benefit of safety.  Much better to stand at deck level rather than on the cabin top when working at the mast in rough conditions.

 

Steve

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33 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

32,000 lbs. please. AIRLOOM has a 6' taller rig than the stock Baba 40 as does CINNAMON GIRL. I think people who disparage "full keel" boats should try sailing one of the Tashiba/Baba series boats. Maybe they could learn something.

Baba 40 racer

 

 

So, you're saying yeah it's a crab crusher, but it's a crab crusher with fender flares & spoilers?

;)

Great pic,BTW, the boat looks very cruise-y but is obviously humping right along!

FB- Doug

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

Class 3 orgasm:

image.png.88463312e37ff9d4e694a24e26a5e00f.png

It's a nice boat, Bull, but I shudder to think of your reaction when it's rigged. And when it's under sail, I advise you stay clear of the area.

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57 minutes ago, IStream said:

It's a nice boat, Bull, but I shudder to think of your reaction when it's rigged. And when it's under sail, I advise you stay clear of the area.

Or at least wear a drysuit.

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On 4/30/2019 at 1:09 AM, rstone said:

 

Gamester.jpg

That polygon-shaped thingy, set flush in the deck, just forward of the house, is it a (gasp!) deck prism by any chance?

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On 4/30/2019 at 1:02 AM, Rasputin22 said:

I think that pinkies have a top strake that serves as a bulwark that sweeps up past the top of the sternpost offset outboard a bit. They meet in a small 'tombstone' as Bob puts it that serves as the backrest for a very convenient toilet seat!

Pinked stern

P1435.jpg

Pinked is a corruption of pinched. As in 'go to the stern if you have to 'pinch one off'

And as a variation, pinking shears:

200px-Zackenschere.jpg

Pinking shears have a utilitarian function for cutting woven cloth. Cloth edges that are unfinished will easily fray, the weave becoming undone and threads pulling out easily. The sawtooth pattern does not prevent the fraying but limits the length of the frayed thread and thus minimizes damage

The cut produced by pinking shears may have been derived from the plant called a pink, a flowering plant in the genus Dianthus (commonly called a carnation).[3] The color pink may have been named after these flowers, although the origins of the name are not definitively known. As the carnation has scalloped, or "pinked", edges to its petals, pinking shears can be thought to produce an edge similar to the flower.

The word "pink" can be used as a verb dating back to 1300 meaning "pierce, stab, make holes in".

- Stumbling

 

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Laurent Giles web page on the Brittany Class here.

In Laurent Giles and HIs Yacht Designs, there is this comment: One of the marked characteristics of the Brittany Class was its large, useful doghouse which had big windows allowing plenty of light and standing headroom below.

At the time of this design, 1939, masts were made of wood, and some of the pictures show an elegantly tapered spar. We are now so used to simple extrusions for masts and booms that we forget how much elegance nicely tapered spars lend to a boat.

2019-05-01_1243.png

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Hard to gain any perspective here but likely a base for the original windlass as shown.

Recall British boats of that era having flush "skylights" so maybe the case. 

Not sure when she crossed the Atlantic but now sailing in PNWGamester_June_1958031.thumb.jpg.dc8144875f0b8e71e88e6f1c5f40f6e5.jpg 

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4 hours ago, Bull City said:

That polygon-shaped thingy, set flush in the deck, just forward of the house, is it a (gasp!) deck prism by any chance?

No, I think it is a chunk of the king plank in the shade.

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