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33 minutes ago, monsoon said:

The Dunning-Kruger companionway is so offset that it doesn't know how offset it is.

And it's unfortunately all the rage these days.

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Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Does it come with a codpiece?  And I can easily singlehand or cruise with the wife and no crew. I say that a lot when I see an exotic, beautiful car, or a mansion that is just too f'n big

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12 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

That sounds worse than a Schrodinger companionway... or Klein bottle companionway, at least those don't leak

FB- Doug

 

Surely a Schrodinger companionway would only work on a Cat?

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10 hours ago, stumblingthunder said:

I have sailed with quite a few crew over my lifetime would would think that an Escher companionway and interior would make perfect sense...

Relativity-escher.jpg

(Hell, I would find it rather entertaining, myself!)

- Stumbling

I sailed with Esher's grandson. There was a distorted sense of reality on that whole delivery trip. It extended well beyond the bounds of the boat too. I would go off watch and get up 4 hours later and we would be 20 miles further away from our goal than when I went to sleep! There may have been drugs involved...

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3 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

The Kronecker Delta companionway is there when you need it, and not when you don't.  Or vice versa,

In mathematics, the Kronecker delta (named after Leopold Kronecker) is a function of two variables, usually just non-negative integers. The function is 1 if the variables are equal, and 0 otherwise:

 
 
δ i j = { 0 if  i ≠ j , 1 if  i = j . {\displaystyle \delta _{ij}={\begin{cases}0&{\text{if }}i\neq j,\\1&{\text{if }}i=j.\end{cases}}} \delta _{{ij}}={\begin{cases}0&{\text{if }}i\neq j,\\1&{\text{if }}i=j.\end{cases}}

where the Kronecker delta δij is a piecewise function of variables i and j. For example, δ1 2 = 0, whereas δ3 3 = 1.

The Kronecker delta appears naturally in many areas of mathematics, physics and engineering, as a means of compactly expressing its definition above.

In linear algebra, the n × n identity matrix I has entries equal to the Kronecker delta:

I i j = δ i j {\displaystyle I_{ij}=\delta _{ij}} {\displaystyle I_{ij}=\delta _{ij}}

where i and j take the values 1, 2, ..., n, and the inner product of vectors can be written as

a ⋅ b = ∑ i , j = 1 n a i δ i j b j . {\displaystyle \mathbf {a} \cdot \mathbf {b} =\sum _{i,j=1}^{n}a_{i}\delta _{ij}b_{j}.} {\displaystyle \mathbf {a} \cdot \mathbf {b} =\sum _{i,j=1}^{n}a_{i}\delta _{ij}b_{j}.}

The restriction to positive integers is common, but there is no reason it cannot have negative integers as well as positive, or any discrete rational numbers. If i and j above take rational values, then for example

δ ( − 1 ) ( − 3 ) = 0 δ ( − 2 ) ( − 2 ) = 1 δ ( 1 2 ) ( − 3 2 ) = 0 δ ( 5 3 ) ( 5 3 ) = 1. {\displaystyle {\begin{aligned}\delta _{(-1)(-3)}&=0&\qquad \delta _{(-2)(-2)}&=1\\\delta _{\left({\frac {1}{2}}\right)\left(-{\frac {3}{2}}\right)}&=0&\qquad \delta _{\left({\frac {5}{3}}\right)\left({\frac {5}{3}}\right)}&=1.\end{aligned}}} {\displaystyle {\begin{aligned}\delta _{(-1)(-3)}&=0&\qquad \delta _{(-2)(-2)}&=1\\\delta _{\left({\frac {1}{2}}\right)\left(-{\frac {3}{2}}\right)}&=0&\qquad \delta _{\left({\frac {5}{3}}\right)\left({\frac {5}{3}}\right)}&=1.\end{aligned}}}
 
 
 
 
I knew that.
 
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2 hours ago, monsoon said:

The Dunning-Kruger companionway is so offset that it doesn't know how offset it is.

They seem to really like them in Florida.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

In mathematics, the Kronecker delta (named after Leopold Kronecker) is a function of two variables, usually just non-negative integers. The function is 1 if the variables are equal, and 0 otherwise:

 
 
δ i j = { 0 if  i ≠ j , 1 if  i = j . {\displaystyle \delta _{ij}={\begin{cases}0&{\text{if }}i\neq j,\\1&{\text{if }}i=j.\end{cases}}} \delta _{{ij}}={\begin{cases}0&{\text{if }}i\neq j,\\1&{\text{if }}i=j.\end{cases}}

where the Kronecker delta δij is a piecewise function of variables i and j. For example, δ1 2 = 0, whereas δ3 3 = 1.

The Kronecker delta appears naturally in many areas of mathematics, physics and engineering, as a means of compactly expressing its definition above.

In linear algebra, the n × n identity matrix I has entries equal to the Kronecker delta:

I i j = δ i j {\displaystyle I_{ij}=\delta _{ij}} {\displaystyle I_{ij}=\delta _{ij}}

where i and j take the values 1, 2, ..., n, and the inner product of vectors can be written as

a ⋅ b = ∑ i , j = 1 n a i δ i j b j . {\displaystyle \mathbf {a} \cdot \mathbf {b} =\sum _{i,j=1}^{n}a_{i}\delta _{ij}b_{j}.} {\displaystyle \mathbf {a} \cdot \mathbf {b} =\sum _{i,j=1}^{n}a_{i}\delta _{ij}b_{j}.}

The restriction to positive integers is common, but there is no reason it cannot have negative integers as well as positive, or any discrete rational numbers. If i and j above take rational values, then for example

δ ( − 1 ) ( − 3 ) = 0 δ ( − 2 ) ( − 2 ) = 1 δ ( 1 2 ) ( − 3 2 ) = 0 δ ( 5 3 ) ( 5 3 ) = 1. {\displaystyle {\begin{aligned}\delta _{(-1)(-3)}&=0&\qquad \delta _{(-2)(-2)}&=1\\\delta _{\left({\frac {1}{2}}\right)\left(-{\frac {3}{2}}\right)}&=0&\qquad \delta _{\left({\frac {5}{3}}\right)\left({\frac {5}{3}}\right)}&=1.\end{aligned}}} {\displaystyle {\begin{aligned}\delta _{(-1)(-3)}&=0&\qquad \delta _{(-2)(-2)}&=1\\\delta _{\left({\frac {1}{2}}\right)\left(-{\frac {3}{2}}\right)}&=0&\qquad \delta _{\left({\frac {5}{3}}\right)\left({\frac {5}{3}}\right)}&=1.\end{aligned}}}
 
 
 
 
I knew that.
 

Now my head hurts. Thanks SJB

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I know it’s a trimaran, but I had a great ride on the trimaran Skateaway yesterday and enjoyed sailing a beam reach at 19-21 knots sustained in a 15 knot southerly. 

C0C45CAD-45E8-40C4-884E-875365712069.jpeg

939EA3B6-5AE3-457E-BDC8-DDFD686C9DDB.png

A319CC05-6A3A-49B5-AF3D-1DACB6E6C382.jpeg

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1 hour ago, Sail4beer said:

I know it’s a trimaran, but I had a great ride on the trimaran Skateaway yesterday and enjoyed sailing a beam reach at 19-21 knots sustained in a 15 knot southerly. 

C0C45CAD-45E8-40C4-884E-875365712069.jpeg

939EA3B6-5AE3-457E-BDC8-DDFD686C9DDB.png

A319CC05-6A3A-49B5-AF3D-1DACB6E6C382.jpeg

That's a machine.

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12 hours ago, Norm said:

that's better - nice S4B - that low boom would keep you on your toes when tacking and gybing ?

 

With a low boom like that wouldn't it be better to be on your knees. (Purple Font).

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On 6/4/2019 at 8:19 AM, alphafb552 said:

There are some legitimate concerns with offset companionways, where they present potential vulnerability during a knockdown.

I seem to recall it was a factor in the rapid sinking of the Pride of Baltimore

That would never happen to a BS boat

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1 hour ago, Cwinsor said:

somehow reminds me of this:

I bet that the boat would be less expensive. But all kidding aside I do like the looks of that boat. 

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On 6/5/2019 at 7:25 AM, stumblingthunder said:

Schrodinger companionway - its both offset and centered, you just don't know which it is until you try to use it?   Or is it that once you enter it, the rest of the crew on deck can assume you are both sleeping and awake (dead and alive,) but don't know until they go down below to check on you.   But then, the checking crew member now becomes both sleeping and awake and the rest of the crew on deck is now debating that both of you are both sleeping and awake below...  

Sounds like they spent a little too much time in a safety meeting before heading out!

- Stumbling

Scientists break from Safety Meeting to confirm this:

https://gizmodo.com/scientists-save-schrodingers-cat-1835208353

They learn to cheat and detect when the "cat" is alive, thus allowing them to open the box and "remove him live".   Now we need to apply that the companionway so that the folks on deck know when to yell to down below to get the "awake" people back on deck for the sail change!

- Stumbling

 

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15 hours ago, Norm said:

that's better - nice S4B - that low boom would keep you on your toes when tacking and gybing ?

 

 Yes. Luckily the cockpit wells are deep and the inset, in-line, symmetric companionways are far from rogue waves and green water!

7F3BE603-3FC9-4343-975C-2A00DF673904.jpeg

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I took this pic late last night just before I moved the little boat and broke the hose fitting sticking up out of the pier. 

It took me about 10 minutes to finally locate the main shutoff valve for the dock...there is no one around to ask at 3:30am.

7F8D1047-5DB8-4E59-ACAE-A135A428D24E.png

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On 5/29/2019 at 3:54 PM, Bull City said:

Isn't this an oxymoron? They are rather rare on this forum.

BTW, I love the boat. Tom, tell us where you found it. It's quite paintable!

Sorry I didn't check back in on this thread for the past week.

The best answer I can give at the moment is: Facebook.

The rest of the answer fell down Schrodinger's companionway. I join various boating groups pretty indiscriminately and have been trying with pretty good success to convince FB's programming to just show me boats and more boats. I just don't react to anything else and it does seem to notice.

Now, which one was I looking at a week ago? Lots of them.

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On 6/5/2019 at 4:01 PM, SloopJonB said:

In mathematics, the Kronecker delta (named after Leopold Kronecker) is a function of two variables, usually just non-negative integers. The function is 1 if the variables are equal, and 0 otherwise:

 
 
δ i j = { 0 if  i ≠ j , 1 if  i = j . {\displaystyle \delta _{ij}={\begin{cases}0&{\text{if }}i\neq j,\\1&{\text{if }}i=j.\end{cases}}} \delta _{{ij}}={\begin{cases}0&{\text{if }}i\neq j,\\1&{\text{if }}i=j.\end{cases}}

where the Kronecker delta δij is a piecewise function of variables i and j. For example, δ1 2 = 0, whereas δ3 3 = 1.

The Kronecker delta appears naturally in many areas of mathematics, physics and engineering, as a means of compactly expressing its definition above.

In linear algebra, the n × n identity matrix I has entries equal to the Kronecker delta:

I i j = δ i j {\displaystyle I_{ij}=\delta _{ij}} {\displaystyle I_{ij}=\delta _{ij}}

where i and j take the values 1, 2, ..., n, and the inner product of vectors can be written as

a ⋅ b = ∑ i , j = 1 n a i δ i j b j . {\displaystyle \mathbf {a} \cdot \mathbf {b} =\sum _{i,j=1}^{n}a_{i}\delta _{ij}b_{j}.} {\displaystyle \mathbf {a} \cdot \mathbf {b} =\sum _{i,j=1}^{n}a_{i}\delta _{ij}b_{j}.}

The restriction to positive integers is common, but there is no reason it cannot have negative integers as well as positive, or any discrete rational numbers. If i and j above take rational values, then for example

δ ( − 1 ) ( − 3 ) = 0 δ ( − 2 ) ( − 2 ) = 1 δ ( 1 2 ) ( − 3 2 ) = 0 δ ( 5 3 ) ( 5 3 ) = 1. {\displaystyle {\begin{aligned}\delta _{(-1)(-3)}&=0&\qquad \delta _{(-2)(-2)}&=1\\\delta _{\left({\frac {1}{2}}\right)\left(-{\frac {3}{2}}\right)}&=0&\qquad \delta _{\left({\frac {5}{3}}\right)\left({\frac {5}{3}}\right)}&=1.\end{aligned}}} {\displaystyle {\begin{aligned}\delta _{(-1)(-3)}&=0&\qquad \delta _{(-2)(-2)}&=1\\\delta _{\left({\frac {1}{2}}\right)\left(-{\frac {3}{2}}\right)}&=0&\qquad \delta _{\left({\frac {5}{3}}\right)\left({\frac {5}{3}}\right)}&=1.\end{aligned}}}
 
 
 
 
I knew that.
 

At last, some commonsense on this topic! 

Brilliant riff, guys, brilliant. 

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10 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

At last, some commonsense on this topic! 

Brilliant riff, guys, brilliant. 

Am I the only one seeing mangled formulae and raw LaTeX?

It's not fair, I am a sucker for this kind of stuff. My daughter sometimes say, we've lost Dad on planet Math!

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3 hours ago, Panoramix said:

Am I the only one seeing mangled formulae and raw LaTeX?

No you're not. We're all math PhDs. Can't you tell? Would you like some chemistry jokes?

:D

10 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

LYNNETTE, Eggemoggin 47 

Kris, do you have a shot of the companionway?

:D

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A couple proper companionways: 

 

The 26' Nielsen/Luke is dead center. It would be hard on your eyes to offset the companionway on a double ender, don't you think? Symmetry. 

LUCY.thumb.jpg.853b5b73e5b32a9f7805d7475a6929ba.jpg

A good old Hinckley. Nearly always the oldest - yet newest looking, fiberglass boat in the harbor. 

EILLEEN.thumb.jpg.57c8b91115942f5470694f93c4530c3a.jpg 

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

A good old Hinckley. Nearly always the oldest - yet newest best looking, fiberglass boat in the harbor. 

EILLEEN.thumb.jpg.57c8b91115942f5470694f93c4530c3a.jpg 

 

FIFY

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4 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

The 26' Nielsen/Luke is dead center. It would be hard on your eyes to offset the companionway on a double ender, don't you think? Symmetry. 

There is a probably a minimum length, below which an off-set companionway just doesn't work visually. 33 to 35 feet perhaps? (Of course the minimum from a safety standpoint is about 500 feet.)

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Here is a view of a Mariner 32. Is that a little overly off set to your eye? It is to mine. But then you've got the mizzen to contend with. I suppose you could have two companionways: one for port tack, one for starboard.

offset.jpg.db95c624be65dd11161a996ab38d84d9.jpg

 

 

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On 5/26/2019 at 7:15 PM, Importunate Tom said:

61183163_2232209083566631_47237068701103

That's a really Admirable gaff boom, at least while in use. The matching curve on the mizzen is cool too. And the way the rudder wraps around the transom.

If someone asked me to take that main sail down I think they'd just get a blank look.

Beautiful. reminds me of a Nigel Irens design.... Image result for nigel irens romilly

Image result for nigel irens romilly

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

Good point. At 30', they (companionways) begin to wander: Pearson Wanderer: 

2108298173_Pearsonsteppingclose.thumb.jpg.42b40e2b842bab0570e02b20b17cafa4.jpg

Kris, what's going on with the lines leading away from the wood pilings, and what the things that look like pipes? Was this photo taken in Canada (aka The Land without Cleats)?

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21 hours ago, Bull City said:

Kris, what's going on with the lines leading away from the wood pilings, and what the things that look like pipes? Was this photo taken in Canada (aka The Land without Cleats)?

 

Those lines hold dinghys off our public docks. Old window sash weights the dinghy lines to the wharf. As the tide rises and falls 10+', the weights keep the dinghys just off the docks. This is high tide: 1769783374_Pearsonstepping.thumb.jpg.269e462d671f5f303abfb5fa31cfb6ac.jpg

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7 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

 

Those lines hold dinghys off our public docks. Old window sash weights the dinghy lines to the wharf. As the tide rises and falls 10+', the weights keep the dinghys just off the docks. This is high tide: 1769783374_Pearsonstepping.thumb.jpg.269e462d671f5f303abfb5fa31cfb6ac.jpg

So each line goes from the stern of the dinghy, around the piling, and has a weight on the other end? At high tide, the line is fully extended, and as the tide drops, the weight drops?

I see some bull rails on the dinghy dock.

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58 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Almost. As the tide drops - the docks and boats go down - the weights go up. Same docks at low water, here.

 

The weights (out of the frame) are nearly to the pulleys attached to the top of the wharf. 

272576900_MAsdinghys2.jpg.3bd592cd033df66f47cc2ac24dc56100.jpg

It's very pleasant to see some traditional small boats among the RIBs.

FB- Doug

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I know it's not a sailboat, but I think it's very cool nonetheless.

Saw Aphrodite at the fuel dock when we were delivering Gemini from winter storage to Pilot's Point in Westbrook CT for the summer. Wow. This would be a fine way to commute to and from work as per her original design brief - sitting in the front cockpit sipping coffee and reading your newspaper while traveling in style! I further admire the (probably recent addition) tender which appears custom-made exactly for that location.

 

Aphrodite has some history. Here are just a few articles:

https://www.theday.com/article/20170722/NWS01/170729789

http://brooklinboatyard.com/aphrodite/

https://stephenswaring.com/yachts/aphrodite/

https://usharbors.com/2012/07/aboard-the-classic-1937-commuter-yacht-aphrodite/

 

I present: Aphrodite (apologies for the iPhone photos; didn't have a "real" camera with me that day)

IMG_2240-X3.jpg

IMG_2238-X3.jpg

IMG_2241-X3.jpg

IMG_2242-X3.jpg

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11 hours ago, RedRyder said:

I know it's not a sailboat, but I think it's very cool nonetheless.

Saw Aphrodite at the fuel dock when we were delivering Gemini from winter storage to Pilot's Point in Westbrook CT for the summer. Wow. This would be a fine way to commute to and from work as per her original design brief - sitting in the front cockpit sipping coffee and reading your newspaper while traveling in style! I further admire the (probably recent addition) tender which appears custom-made exactly for that location.

 

Aphrodite has some history. Here are just a few articles:

https://www.theday.com/article/20170722/NWS01/170729789

http://brooklinboatyard.com/aphrodite/

https://stephenswaring.com/yachts/aphrodite/

https://usharbors.com/2012/07/aboard-the-classic-1937-commuter-yacht-aphrodite/

 

I present: Aphrodite (apologies for the iPhone photos; didn't have a "real" camera with me that day)

IMG_2240-X3.jpg

IMG_2238-X3.jpg

Nice rump.

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On 6/16/2019 at 8:56 AM, RedRyder said:

I know it's not a sailboat, but I think it's very cool nonetheless.

Saw Aphrodite at the fuel dock when we were delivering Gemini from winter storage to Pilot's Point in Westbrook CT for the summer. Wow. This would be a fine way to commute to and from work as per her original design brief - sitting in the front cockpit sipping coffee and reading your newspaper while traveling in style! I further admire the (probably recent addition) tender which appears custom-made exactly for that location.

 

Aphrodite has some history. Here are just a few articles:

https://www.theday.com/article/20170722/NWS01/170729789

http://brooklinboatyard.com/aphrodite/

https://stephenswaring.com/yachts/aphrodite/

https://usharbors.com/2012/07/aboard-the-classic-1937-commuter-yacht-aphrodite/

 

I present: Aphrodite (apologies for the iPhone photos; didn't have a "real" camera with me that day)

IMG_2240-X3.jpg

IMG_2238-X3.jpg

IMG_2241-X3.jpg

IMG_2242-X3.jpg

I just give a big sigh every time I see her in Watch Hill...

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1 minute ago, CyberBOB said:

Almost enough to make a guy turn to the dark side.  Almost.

Yeah, nope. Between the polishing of the metal, the cleaning of the glass, the varnishing of the wood, and the filling of the tanks, it's completely out of my league.

I won't even pay a guy to mow my lawn...This would not only require 10-100X my net worth and income but a complete personality transplant.

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Yeah, Aphrodite and Thunderbird and the like are commuter boats and picnic launches for the ultra rich. And the years have not made any thing cheaper. Especially fuel for the pair of vintage Allison V-12’s.

 

I’m just glad that their are people that keep classics going, not just these but unreachable classic sailboats such as the J-Class yachts as well.

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26 minutes ago, CyberBOB said:

I’m just glad that their are people that keep classics going, not just these but unreachable classic sailboats such as the J-Class yachts as well.

I'm right there with you.

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45 minutes ago, IStream said:

Yeah, nope. Between the polishing of the metal, the cleaning of the glass, the varnishing of the wood, and the filling of the tanks, it's completely out of my league.

I won't even pay a guy to mow my lawn...This would not only require 10-100X my net worth and income but a complete personality transplant.

Thunderbird required owning a casino IIRC.

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I chanced across the Pegiva brand while working for a boating rag about a decade ago. There are similar designs, however this seemed particularly well made. I've always owned sailboats, but this kinda grabbed me. Has a double berth up front.

Related image

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On 6/17/2019 at 3:03 AM, rendon said:

The Aphrodite boat looks awesome!

Since Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, passion and procreation, I was going to say voluptuous.

image.png.9e71aae8356ddfff15298377023b5b94.png

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On 6/6/2019 at 8:08 AM, Cwinsor said:

somehow reminds me of this:

 

:Woman sleeping in bed on her side with her head on pillow

 

On my iPhone that looks like a Wyeth.  (?)

Gunters- best of all worlds- shape control baby!  Now if I could just figure out how to put one on Amati....with 22 degree swept spreaders.  Really short lower mast?  Lots of light air sail, and automatic gust response while reefed....

(Off in the distance, I hear the soft sound of heads exploding? ;))

(Or is it an echo?)

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On 6/8/2019 at 6:57 AM, Kris Cringle said:

A good old Hinckley. Nearly always the oldest - yet newest looking, fiberglass boat in the harbor. 

EILLEEN.thumb.jpg.57c8b91115942f5470694f93c4530c3a.jpg

Kind of newfangled looking with the name/hail treatment. Hinckley stopped using real gold leaf on the powerboats.

I kept my transom traditional looking.

j6NMBHZ.jpg

 

 

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2 hours ago, Matagi said:

20140710_190654.jpg

Best Frankenboat there ever was and will be.

Spaekhugger hull. Beautiful top added. Rudder hung.

Allegedly Peter Bruun's own boat. Wouldn't surprise me.

On the opposite side of my pier, there's a Spækhugger quite similar to that. I'll try to grab a picture of it later today.

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9 hours ago, Matagi said:

20140710_190654.jpg

Best Frankenboat there ever was and will be.

Spaekhugger hull. Beautiful top added. Rudder hung.

Allegedly Peter Bruun's own boat. Wouldn't surprise me.

Not my cup of tea but certainly a coolboat.

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"Wooden" boats are tricky. With fresh paint and varnish, they often are the newest looking boats in the harbor. The HAWK looked like a new build at the docks, but also looks dated somehow. 

1468246903_TheHAWK1.thumb.jpg.70cbdfb1f080b0d4b3fda749bb737788.jpg

Sure enough, HAWK isn't new at all. She has local roots. Conveived by Henry Sheel of Rockport Maine in the late 60's, HAWK was drawn by Bill Tripp to compete in the "One Ton" international series of the day.

2073649196_TheHAWKsternclose.thumb.jpg.dc34acd910b964d0d11ab03cb2077dce.jpg

She had her heyday in the One Ton then was modified to compete in the new IOR rule, which she did all over the world with crew lists that reads like yacht racing history. 

35 trophies and countless awards later, she ended up back in Maine, tired no doubt.

 

An optimistic owner planned to restore her but that was not to be. So she was offered up for free to anyone who could prove a serious intent to restore the boat. 

 

Obviously that person was found and HAWK was just recently restored at the Brooklin Boatyard on the Eggemoggin Reach. 

790005553_TheHAWK2.thumb.jpg.cf6193f1ceca57492ec9f0510fe5a6be.jpg

She'll probably race in a more leisurely manner today in the popular classic boat races around the area.

 

The owner better be a top sailor, she's likely to have a challenging rating. 

 

The HAWK 3.jpg

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On 6/28/2019 at 8:36 AM, SloopJonB said:

Looks kind of bulbous to me.

True, but the bulbs do balance near perfectly. I like it. That spoon bow actually works aesthetically by balancing the other spoons. Really nice and bold design.

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20 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Obviously that person was found and HAWK was just recently restored at the Brooklin Boatyard on the Eggemoggin Reach. 

790005553_TheHAWK2.thumb.jpg.cf6193f1ceca57492ec9f0510fe5a6be.jpg

She'll probably race in a more leisurely manner today in the popular classic boat races around the area.

I would hope that she would be more leisurely. And a boat like this deserves an appropriate crew

Image result for wedding crashers rachel mcadams

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On 6/28/2019 at 10:49 AM, Misbehavin' said:

On the opposite side of my pier, there's a Spækhugger quite similar to that. I'll try to grab a picture of it later today.

Oh well, "later today". I went out on a weekend cruise and forgot about it, but here it is. 

I'm not sure if it's with a spade rudder or skeg hung rudder, definitely not a hung rudder like on the earlier posted picture. I'll have to ask the owner, when I see him again. The first production Spækhuggers had a spade rudder, but that quite early got changed to a skeg hung rudder because of design/construction issues. About 300 were built.

image1.jpeg

tegninger600.jpg

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On 7/3/2019 at 3:08 PM, Misbehavin' said:

Oh well, "later today". I went out on a weekend cruise and forgot about it, but here it is. 

I'm not sure if it's with a spade rudder or skeg hung rudder, definitely not a hung rudder like on the earlier posted picture. I'll have to ask the owner, when I see him again. The first production Spækhuggers had a spade rudder, but that quite early got changed to a skeg hung rudder because of design/construction issues. About 300 were built.

image1.jpeg

tegninger600.jpg

She reminds me a bit of the Marsvin.

 

40265513124_8261b1399a_b.jpg

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