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I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

Not my boat, but it's cool and I did take the photo

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Mr Perry (or, if I may, Bob), 

Can I ask about the design brief for that fine looking yacht above?  It certainly looks like it could be a world-cruising boat for a large family, maybe heading towards the higher latitudes. 

Some idea of the impetus for this particular design would be welcome. 

 

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On 2/26/2020 at 4:00 AM, Bob Perry said:

Ch, ch, ch, ch changes:

Rob 3X.jpg

Cracker looking yacht Bob.

A real yacht looking like a real yacht that would do real yacht stuff with a friendly ketch rig and somewhere to hunker out of the weather.

Walk out to the end of that bowsprit whilst on a beam reach and you are in heaven.

Always wanted one of your CT 56’s and as most artists do their best work before some of the best became toast at 27 at 28 you punched out a pearler and walked on down the hall...

Compared to this similar sized Briand “Egoist” you have nailed it in my book.

E08B08A9-A100-4744-B92F-67B01061CE28.thumb.jpeg.91b2a47145598c229751b0af7935a1d7.jpeg

 

 

 

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49 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Everybody knows the red boat is a BB. Crowninsheild Knockabout designed in 1908, but does anyone know what DRAGON RUN is? (I don't and looking to find out) 

532307925_DragonRunFrolic.thumb.jpg.d597aef6b2b4ceb2f17f23ebdd1f2cf1.jpg

 

Found more pix, and the MMSI, 338120407, but that's it.

https://www.marinetraffic.com/cs/photos/of/ships/shipid:396234/#forward

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8 hours ago, Priscilla said:

Cracker looking yacht Bob.

A real yacht looking like a real yacht that would do real yacht stuff with a friendly ketch rig and somewhere to hunker out of the weather.

 

 

 

 

Out of the weather for sure but I don't think one will be "hunkering" in this boat!

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On 2/25/2020 at 7:00 AM, Bob Perry said:

Ch, ch, ch, ch changes:

 

All I can find is the change to 3 (swept) spreaders on the main mast and the elimination of the running back stays. 

Simplified running rigging is good.  Any other benefits?

Steve

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My old Schooner "Europe". The first yacht registered under the brand new European Union flag. Baptised  by Princess Grace Kelly of Monaco. We acquired the boat after she went around the world. Thank you to Pierre Brouillet for the photo. I have so few of them.

 

 

 

 

 

87528561_3188052341224598_8754220905002958848_n.jpg

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Who was the designer?  The hull shape is very similar to ours, we have never been able to track down who drew our boat. The closest we got was the lines were loosely taken off of something else. It's a late 50's early 60' build.

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Soooo nice!  It's pretty amazing the state of the Alden schooners out there.  For the most part all still out on the water with some having gone through complete refit rebuilds, still winning races at almost a century old.  The retired shipright we met in La Cruz MX who set us up with local wood for resplining our hull was involved in a bunch of work on Curlew, had some cools pics and prints in his shop.

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The specs on that construction are eye popping - the deck beams are the size of timbers I've used for retaining walls FFS. :blink:

A 40' or so version would certainly be my dream boat.

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17 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

 

A 40' or so version would certainly be my dream boat.

Keep a eye out for Fame, it's in B-ham now.  Or if Craig ever looses his mind and sells Lucky Star.  Not Aldens but some of the nicest small schooners out there. 

 

Dauntless is down to 2 something, rewind 15 years of our refit and I would have been dumb enough to buy it.

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4 hours ago, Bull City said:

Like these?

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_67e.thumb.jpg.7bf61d217382398c39c22aeeb3d0fc1e.jpgUNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_67f.thumb.jpg.cd52eab2fd7c512111b2425a84f56050.jpgUNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_681.thumb.jpg.08218e4fd1c67a74ba2b4f54a5ec6acc.jpgUNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_682.thumb.jpg.c92ea98676820619566b6614855dfde5.jpg

Perfection would be one of those but Nightrunner style - epoxy laminated, fin keel etc.

Modern where it counts and old where it counts.

I could probably learn to live with a schooner rigged Cherubini 47.

image.png.c9dcc554f23d93fffdddc39c6bb05e70.png

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I like the schooner splinter. The big Alden is grand but I still think the amount that a boat gets used and enjoyed tends to vary inversely with length.

Spotted at the boat ramp yesterday. Not sure what it is but I think it's cool. It's not from around here and hasn't been here long. Painted steel trailers have a lifespan measured in weeks here.

89203178_10218988383094565_4258879430295

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22 hours ago, Priscilla said:

Quite remarkable they both are still afloat.

Talking of schooners Howard Chapelle.

https://www.trademe.co.nz/motors/boats-marine/yachts/keeler/auction-2538198130.htm?rsqid=6764728936914cf88365b2896e4d92cb-0011270680631.thumb.jpg.62dcf0e50761d986d9c7076f6327547f.jpg

If I brought her home, the her of the house would probably love me to death, after she finished killing me for spending that much. Wonder if I would survive?

I’m fickle for sure, but she is lovely

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21 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

As you know, there are more schooners around here than you can shake a stick at. 

Also true of Lunenburg, N.S.

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

I cannot, sorry. It was moored in our harbor some years ago and I've not seen it since. As you know, there are more schooners lobster pots around here than you can shake a stick at. 

76528193_MerchantsrowPschooner.thumb.jpg.bace6f6a2c9460e582ae26d2b812c5f6.jpg

 

FIFY

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I think the captains and crews escape the drudgery of 6 days, 24/7 waiting on charterers, by sailing these old lumbering, near barges. It's a real challenge and also a competition between the boats. You hear them on the VHF talking wind strength and direction between the boats. The days often end with a dramatic anchoring under sail, no small feat by any sailor but especially challenging with these cargo schooners, most of which are engineless(yawl boat assisted isn't too handy in close quarters). 

1912332004_MovingsceneryintheFoxIslandThoroughfare.jpg.c7c1fb35442cd0d2870b56eabf7f9c1d.jpg

This also results in some bravado out there as some captains try to outdo each other. Still, it adds to the ongoing spectacle along our coast. Just stay out of their way and enjoy the show. 

1338516364_Sailingwestschoonerheadingeastward..jpg.f3a71adf24cd8b56d897585f414db51b.jpg

 

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2 hours ago, Panoramix said:

Thanks for this, this is a really cool boat.

Any guesses how the sail is attached to the mast? I am assuming that the masts are fixed in place and each sail hoisted on a halyard - what means is used to accomplish the 'wrap' around the mast? I am facing a similar problem

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I think so. I didn't talk to them, they were anchored in Pretty Marsh near us in 2007, a girl and her dog. Looks like there's just enough down below for the 2 of them. 

 

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1 hour ago, luminary said:

Any guesses how the sail is attached to the mast? I am assuming that the masts are fixed in place and each sail hoisted on a halyard - what means is used to accomplish the 'wrap' around the mast? I am facing a similar problem

Those look like sleeves, not wraps

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1 hour ago, luminary said:

Any guesses how the sail is attached to the mast? I am assuming that the masts are fixed in place and each sail hoisted on a halyard - what means is used to accomplish the 'wrap' around the mast? I am facing a similar problem

My guess would be a heavy duty zipper like those you find on sail covers.

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1 hour ago, Panoramix said:

My guess would be a heavy duty zipper like those you find on sail covers.

to me it looks like the 'sleeve' is decorative rather than structural. I'm guessing that there is a boltrope/track involved and there is a flap wrapping the mast and velcro-ed down the length. Why though?

Parts of the luff look really squishy

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6 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

I think the captains and crews escape the drudgery of 6 days, 24/7 waiting on charterers, by sailing these old lumbering, near barges. It's a real challenge and also a competition between the boats. You hear them on the VHF talking wind strength and direction between the boats. The days often end with a dramatic anchoring under sail, no small feat by any sailor but especially challenging with these cargo schooners, most of which are engineless(yawl boat assisted isn't too handy in close quarters). 

1912332004_MovingsceneryintheFoxIslandThoroughfare.jpg.c7c1fb35442cd0d2870b56eabf7f9c1d.jpg

This also results in some bravado out there as some captains try to outdo each other. Still, it adds to the ongoing spectacle along our coast. Just stay out of their way and enjoy the show. 

1338516364_Sailingwestschoonerheadingeastward..jpg.f3a71adf24cd8b56d897585f414db51b.jpg

 

That's Victory Chimes in the first photo. She's become such a fixture of sailing downeast that she''s the schooner on the Maine state quarter.  She was built for the Chesapeake and has a centerboard which extends her draft from something like 7 ft. to 18 ft.  No engine onboard except for a 1904 one cylinder 6hp Seeger which runs her capstan.

Kris, is that Heritage in the second photo?

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57 minutes ago, MFH125 said:

That's Victory Chimes in the first photo. She's become such a fixture of sailing downeast that she''s the schooner on the Maine state quarter.  She was built for the Chesapeake and has a centerboard which extends her draft from something like 7 ft. to 18 ft.  No engine onboard except for a 1904 one cylinder 6hp Seeger which runs her capstan.

Kris, is that Heritage in the second photo?

I'm 99.9% sure that it is the Heritage. Are you from the area? 

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Foot of the jib looks a little flat, but maybe you need lead aft to get some twist up high to get the fisherman airbrake to fly that nicely?

Fixed it for you, although it DOES look cool.

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2 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Need to sweat up that throat halyard and buntline.

Looks nice for pictures though. In fact, I'll go ahead and say, that's beautiful

FB- Doug

Ditto - the luff is so far off center it's just tipping the boat over.

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That's funny, this is the second multipost commentary I have seen on the sail trim of the same picture of that schooner.  It might even be somewhere back on this thread.  Looks like fisherman they are flying is on a gaff fore so that's about all the tighter it's getting, can't really point with it like one on a track on the fore. Maybe all around over sheeted for the photo op.  I wish I had a little fisherman like that.  We tend to be pretty conservative as our only one is pretty big, 5 knots of wind the wrong way makes it a totally different photo op for us.

Bull City, Fame is in Bellingham now Connors sold her. Unless he got board and bought it back.

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On 3/4/2020 at 8:11 AM, Kris Cringle said:

I think the captains and crews escape the drudgery of 6 days, 24/7 waiting on charterers, by sailing these old lumbering, near barges. It's a real challenge and also a competition between the boats. You hear them on the VHF talking wind strength and direction between the boats. The days often end with a dramatic anchoring under sail, no small feat by any sailor but especially challenging with these cargo schooners, most of which are engineless(yawl boat assisted isn't too handy in close quarters). 

 

This also results in some bravado out there as some captains try to outdo each other. Still, it adds to the ongoing spectacle along our coast. Just stay out of their way and enjoy the show. 

 

 

I was on the RC for Camden Classics last summer.  It was awesome to watch the schooners line up and race.  They started last and by then someone had switched the fan on.  

The committee boat was Atlantide.  Not bad eye candy herself. 

20190727_173543.jpg

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18 hours ago, luminary said:

to me it looks like the 'sleeve' is decorative rather than structural. I'm guessing that there is a boltrope/track involved and there is a flap wrapping the mast and velcro-ed down the length. Why though?

Parts of the luff look really squishy

You very well might be right sir as there are photos of the boat without sleeve :

diapositive171_orig.jpg

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This is about 5 minutes of footage from the October 1938, International Fisherman's Trophy final, Bluenose vs. Gertrude L. Thebaud. Simply amazing.

 

 

 

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An acquaintance has finished the restoration of this puppy and will have her at the classic yacht races in New England this summer, including Camden Classic and ERR. 1926 Alfred Mylne. 

0x0_376_127079951759c3d29a981cc.jpg.4bbb368479e427e50b356f6fc55ab4df.jpg

 

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3 hours ago, Bull City said:

This is about 5 minutes of footage from the October 1938, International Fisherman's Trophy final, Bluenose vs. Gertrude L. Thebaud. Simply amazing.

The loser of that race has what I consider to be the worst sailboat name ever.

I mean WTF could name their boat Gertrude?

 

(I know, I know - Mr. Thebaud)

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4 hours ago, sshow bob said:

I was on the RC for Camden Classics last summer.  It was awesome to watch the schooners line up and race.  They started last and by then someone had switched the fan on.  

The committee boat was Atlantide.  Not bad eye candy herself. 

The post on the front page about Dunkirk made me want to edit my post, but I can't - so:   Atlantide was part of the evacuation fleet at Dunkirk, and took incoming fire.  It was surreal to stand in her house and score a regatta on a sunny day, while thinking about more serious days she's had.

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On 3/2/2020 at 8:59 AM, Kris Cringle said:

Schooner splinter

522929124_Schoonersplinter.thumb.jpg.2c3f5ab53a8046808cc4f2dab8f3a01c.jpg

This looks to be  a small  Tancook whaler designed by Peter Van Dine back in the 70s. LOA 25 ft 6 in   WL 20 ft       BEAM 6 ft 4 in   DRAFT 2 ft 10in SA 301Sq ft   Disp 3,700 Lb     There is a good write up on her in the book Thirty Classic Boat Designs by Roger Taylor.

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1 hour ago, sshow bob said:

The post on the front page about Dunkirk made me want to edit my post, but I can't - so:   Atlantide was part of the evacuation fleet at Dunkirk, and took incoming fire.  It was surreal to stand in her house and score a regatta on a sunny day, while thinking about more serious days she's had.

She anchored next to us at the ERR a few year ago. I'd just sit in the cockpit with a drink and admire.

You may know that Little Vigilant has been donated to Mystic. Her former owner is the gent who owns the A. Mylne design above. He previously restored and gave away a NY32. One of the coolest guys I know.

I think we'll be at the Camden Classic this year. 

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7 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

She anchored next to us at the ERR a few year ago. I'd just sit in the cockpit with a drink and admire.

You may know that Little Vigilant has been donated to Mystic. Her former owner is the gent who owns the A. Mylne design above. He previously restored and gave away a NY32. One of the coolest guys I know.

I think we'll be at the Camden Classic this year. 

Definitely an interesting guy to spend a few days with.  I really enjoyed his company. He loves his boats, and seems to love sharing them. 

Have you ever looked at what Atlantide looked like before Tom Perkins rebuild her?  He may have a checkered relationship with sailing anarchy, but it took vision to see her as she is now, in what there was to see then!

 

Camden Classic is going strong - its worth attending if you can. 

SYIQ_25401.png

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23 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

I'm 99.9% sure that it is the Heritage. Are you from the area?  

Yes. I sail out of Castine.  Love all your pictures on here! Looks like you're located in Brooklin or Sedgewick?

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28 minutes ago, MFH125 said:

Yes. I sail out of Castine.  Love all your pictures on here! Looks like you're located in Brooklin or Sedgewick?

Rockport but I'd happy sailing out of either of those. We spent a night in Castine last season. Love it there. The bay is too big for a lifetime. 

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15 hours ago, SASSAFRASS said:

Bull City, Fame is in Bellingham now Connors sold her. Unless he got board and bought it back.

I didn't know that. Now I have another reason to visit the PNW. I have lost count of how many I have.

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14 hours ago, Bull City said:

This is about 5 minutes of footage from the October 1938, International Fisherman's Trophy final, Bluenose vs. Gertrude L. Thebaud. Simply amazing.

 

 

 

 I just finished reading Wanderer. Had no idea there was footage of the race. Awesome - thanks!

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16 hours ago, Bull City said:

This is about 5 minutes of footage from the October 1938, International Fisherman's Trophy final, Bluenose vs. Gertrude L. Thebaud. Simply amazing.

 

 

Too bad the video  didn't show the the boats going through the tacks.

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That looks nice. Where I come from, most larger clubs had one of these for 'education' (beer runs to Copenhagen, basically).

Sometimes they would capsize in the middle of the Elbe and lead to some adventurous tales that got exaggerated exponentially in the following years.

Vegefeuer_18-768x542.jpg

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