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I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

My old Schooner "Europe". The first yacht registered under the brand new European Union flag. Baptised  by Princess Grace Kelly of Monaco. We acquired the boat after she went around the world. Thank y

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9 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

The first person to eat an oyster must have been very hungry.

"He was a bold man that first ate an oyster."' - Jonathan Swift

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On 4/28/2020 at 11:51 AM, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

It's the 1st sailboat I was ever aboard.  I'm looking forward to seeing how the folks in NC and Annapolis have kept her up. 

This was my Uncle Ralph's boat.  My grandfather built her in 1940 - and my last time aboard was in 1982, summer before I went to boot camp

 Captain Ralph taught me what work was - and about the value of family boats. I'm really happy that others have appreciated what these bunches of sticks might mean, and have sought to preserve them for the appreciation of future generations. 

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4 hours ago, MFH125 said:

Matagi, do you know who designed Winning III?  My German isn't great, but my impression from the video was that while she was owned by Vertens she isn't his design?

https://www.fky.org/literatur/hefte/fky10-vertens.pdf

Shortly after the outbreak of the Second World War, his own

A small racing sea cruiser "Winning III" completed in the old barn. It

seems that Karl Vertens useful experience that he had with his six

made use of it. Vertens has his thoughts on important problems,

for which he had no scientific documentation yet, also on this ship

tried and tested. The front ends of the water lines are, for example, "Winning III"

distinctly rounded to reduce eddy formation when turning.

 

 

Page 8

 

The rounding of the stevens was to avoid unsightly surface effects

even carried out to the deck ..

The rig of "Winning III" is deliberately hand-picked with its tree jib,

and as a 60-year-old he treated himself to a folding table and built-in toilet

certain comfort below deck (what modesty!). His favorite color,

former employees of the shipyard said, was a bright green, which

perfectly harmonized with the mahogany surrounds of the furnishings. To

extensive dismantling work in 1994/95, "Winning III" was largely restored.

posed. One of the previous owners was Peter Himstedt from SVAOe, who

finally bought the 12 "dream" (see newsletter 8/1997). Like the 12

"Winning III" was rebuilt at Heuer in Finkenwerder and at Asmus in Glück-

city covered with fiberglass in the 1960s. There are other options today

many, but without these measures from the owners at that time would be of many yachts

nothing lef

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1 hour ago, FixinGit said:

Would prefer a cutter rig for me but go anywhere big. 

750F0CF7-C2E5-4FC3-89CD-8F0A1C292779.jpeg

Forgot: Mr & Mrs Dashew’s- Beowulf 80. Aluminium.

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4 hours ago, Priscilla said:

https://www.fky.org/literatur/hefte/fky10-vertens.pdf

Shortly after the outbreak of the Second World War, his own

A small racing sea cruiser "Winning III" completed in the old barn. It

seems that Karl Vertens useful experience that he had with his six

made use of it. Vertens has his thoughts on important problems,

for which he had no scientific documentation yet, also on this ship

tried and tested. The front ends of the water lines are, for example, "Winning III"

distinctly rounded to reduce eddy formation when turning.

 

 

Page 8

 

The rounding of the stevens was to avoid unsightly surface effects

even carried out to the deck ..

The rig of "Winning III" is deliberately hand-picked with its tree jib,

and as a 60-year-old he treated himself to a folding table and built-in toilet

certain comfort below deck (what modesty!). His favorite color,

former employees of the shipyard said, was a bright green, which

perfectly harmonized with the mahogany surrounds of the furnishings. To

extensive dismantling work in 1994/95, "Winning III" was largely restored.

posed. One of the previous owners was Peter Himstedt from SVAOe, who

finally bought the 12 "dream" (see newsletter 8/1997). Like the 12

"Winning III" was rebuilt at Heuer in Finkenwerder and at Asmus in Glück-

city covered with fiberglass in the 1960s. There are other options today

many, but without these measures from the owners at that time would be of many yachts

nothing lef

Thanks!

 

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A lot more appealing than a tiny house.

A few years back someone in deep cove did a slightly different take on a ferry lifeboat hull. It was done more African Queen style, trimmed out with a lot of thick, solid teak on top and a lunker diesel - can't remember the brand but it was an old style thumper.

It was really nicely done and went dirt cheap. I remember thinking it would have made a fabulous island support boat - maybe for someone on Abode or Passage islands or another private boat access only island.

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On 5/3/2020 at 1:21 PM, Bull City said:

"He was a bold man that first ate an oyster."' - Jonathan Swift

This concept has always confused me, I mean surely man has been eating oysters since before man was man - Homo erectus and our other ancestors wouldn't have been so squeamish! Maybe the first man to turn his nose up at an oyster was the oddity! 

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7 hours ago, ALL@SEA said:

This concept has always confused me, I mean surely man has been eating oysters since before man was man - Homo erectus and our other ancestors wouldn't have been so squeamish! Maybe the first man to turn his nose up at an oyster was the oddity! 

I wouldn't over-think it.

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I'm more interested in how they figured out which mushrooms are poisonous. 

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2 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I'm more interested in how they figured out which mushrooms are poisonous. 

yeah, mushrooms: some of 'em taste good, some of 'em have you talking to god, some of 'em kill you

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2 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Trial & Error?

image.png.751f2efc5860f9838ca9fb320baa52b7.png

Testing on captives?

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4 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I'm more interested in how they figured out which mushrooms are poisonous. 

I've always wondered how anyone figured out the method for making olives edible. 

Glad they did, still, if you have ever gone through the process it's not exactly intuitive. 

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33 minutes ago, Oceanconcepts said:

I've always wondered how anyone figured out the method for making olives edible. 

Glad they did, still, if you have ever gone through the process it's not exactly intuitive. 

A few years ago, Mrs. Bull and I spent a few weeks in Italy. We stayed at a farm near Orvieto for a few days. One day while wandering among the olive trees, I noticed some ripe olives still hanging on the tree. I tried one and it was delicious (if you like olives). Of course, I ate a few more.

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

A few years ago, Mrs. Bull and I spent a few weeks in Italy. We stayed at a farm near Orvieto for a few days. One day while wandering among the olive trees, I noticed some ripe olives still hanging on the tree. I tried one and it was delicious (if you like olives). Of course, I ate a few more.

Isn't there a particular type that doesn't need to be brined?  Was that one of them?  Big green ones maybe whose names I can't remember?  

The black ones I've tried off the tree taste like poison.  

Always wondered if maybe the olives fell into a tidepool or something & that tipped people off.  

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8 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I'm more interested in how they figured out which mushrooms are poisonous. 

all kinds of mushrooms are edible, but some of them might be some kind of "once in a lifetime" experience, if you get what i mean...;)

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5 hours ago, Bull City said:

Trial & Error?

image.png.751f2efc5860f9838ca9fb320baa52b7.png

well done. I love BC. When I was a kid, my dad had a couple paperback collections of the BC comics (as well as Wizard of ID) and I loved staying up late and reading them. Good stuff. 

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5 minutes ago, Slick470 said:

well done. I love BC. When I was a kid, my dad had a couple paperback collections of the BC comics (as well as Wizard of ID) and I loved staying up late and reading them. Good stuff. 

oh god, When I was a kid I had paper back collections of BC and the wizard of ID

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18 minutes ago, chester said:

oh god, When I was a kid I had paper back collections of BC and the wizard of ID

I wanted to take them with me after I graduated college, but my dad wouldn't let me. I'm pretty sure they are still stacked up in the closet where I left them. 

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The single best Wiz ever was a prisoner strapped to the wall of the dungeon. The lawyer says "If you plead guilty I can get you a reduced charge". Next panel the guards are hauling the prisoner away and he says over his shoulder "Big deal, 20,000 volts instead of 40,000". :D

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6 hours ago, Bull City said:

A few years ago, Mrs. Bull and I spent a few weeks in Italy. We stayed at a farm near Orvieto for a few days. One day while wandering among the olive trees, I noticed some ripe olives still hanging on the tree. I tried one and it was delicious (if you like olives). Of course, I ate a few more.

I have never had that experience- all the tree olives I've encountered, including the green ones we cured, were... astringent. But they were not Italian.  You have answered my question. Starting with something that is reasonably edible and moving to preservation makes sense. 

We have a niece who is quite a bit better off than us financially, and who with her husband just finished a several year project restoring an 18th century villa in Tuscany, complete with olive groves and vineyards. Quite an undertaking, considering the need to keep to historical appearances and also meet seismic standards. We get their olive oil and their wine, both spectacular, every year. This summer was going to be our time to visit for a few weeks. Of course, those plans are sadly on hold now, so my opportunity to replicate your experience must await happier times. 

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15 hours ago, Bull City said:

A few years ago, Mrs. Bull and I spent a few weeks in Italy. We stayed at a farm near Orvieto for a few days. One day while wandering among the olive trees, I noticed some ripe olives still hanging on the tree. I tried one and it was delicious (if you like olives). Of course, I ate a few more.

Did you get to climb up and visit Orvieto?   

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8 hours ago, Oceanconcepts said:

We have a niece who is quite a bit better off than us financially, and who with her husband just finished a several year project restoring an 18th century villa in Tuscany, complete with olive groves and vineyards. Quite an undertaking, considering the need to keep to historical appearances and also meet seismic standards. We get their olive oil and their wine, both spectacular, every year. This summer was going to be our time to visit for a few weeks. Of course, those plans are sadly on hold now, so my opportunity to replicate your experience must await happier times. 

Hang in there, Tuscany is well worth the wait!  Beyond beautiful, with the very best food and wine I've ever had.

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1 hour ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Did you get to climb up and visit Orvieto?   

Oh yes. We had porchetta sandwiches for lunch here:

1140253865_eaxyqTnQlufb1LckQGS2w_thumb_56ba.thumb.jpg.ebd20da1cf3bdee127be4725c6aa6746.jpg

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_4487.thumb.jpg.1b191ee65c74ef806c65a4f6aa97a208.jpg

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Something else from Italy...

From the NY TImes October 2019, Sailing boats at the starting line of the Barcolana regatta in the Gulf of Trieste.

Screen_Shot_2020-05-05_at_4_39.52_PM.thumb.png.70a73df1b441ea6b0d46b41bf18adcf4.png

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Bruce King was an artist.

This is his personal boat Unicorn. A bit like Night Runner in concept with a fin keel underbody.

image.png.554c4e2cc29f3f80513f19c6b1c84f9a.png

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4 hours ago, Crash said:

I've always lusted over Whitehawk....

On the Watch for Whitehawk A 105' Ketch Has Entered the Bell's ...

 

This is Spirit of Tradition done right!

Gorgeous. Everybody on deck should be in whites when under way.

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16 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Bruce King was an artist.

This is his personal boat Unicorn. A bit like Night Runner in concept with a fin keel underbody.

image.png.554c4e2cc29f3f80513f19c6b1c84f9a.png

 

And a very light, cold molded wood hull. That boat under full sail was probably the most beautiful sight I ever enjoyed on the water. She just danced and the guy who owned her at the time (the name Reynolds rings a bell) could really sail her. I remember an afternoon at anchor at Mission Point in Mission Bay watching her storm into the anchorage under full sail and, just at the last minute before crashing onto the beach, luffing up, dropping anchor, dousing sails and heading below for a cocktail or who knows what, all in less than ten minutes. Where is she today?

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2 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Wild Horsaes beaty.jpg

That's a great looking boat. I could never understand why the Sundeer types always had to be so ugly. 

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1 hour ago, Matagi said:

While there is a Doug Peterson QT in the What is it thread, I got carried away a bit and found this from 7 years ago: What is she and what's happend since?

post-33230-0-47825000-1385059295.jpg

Wii O' The Wisp, AKA The Cedar Speeder - Peterson Two Tonner that has been expensively updated with carbon rig and T Keel.

Spectacularly beautiful boat that has been for sale here for about a decade. Last price I saw was $90-ish. Probably less than was spent on the updates.

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42 minutes ago, Priscilla said:

This is X-Distant Drummer. I looked at her in Sidney quite some time ago. Back then she had issues with some rot up  in the stem and I think also a slight bit in the Transom which has allot of staining. Bent is an amazing builder, old world skill, finest quality. This boat was extremely well built.  http://www.jespersenboats.com/distant-drummer.html  To the best of my recollection.... They are asking about twice what she was going to sell for back then. 

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2 hours ago, Navig8tor said:

Seem to recall in my hazy rum soaked recesses some Antiguans standing on her keel after a knockdown :rolleyes:

On second thoughts,  it might have been Whitefin that got knocked down in Antigua 1985?

Another classic along the same lines King design

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9 hours ago, 2flit said:

This is X-Distant Drummer. I looked at her in Sidney quite some time ago. Back then she had issues with some rot up  in the stem and I think also a slight bit in the Transom which has allot of staining. Bent is an amazing builder, old world skill, finest quality. This boat was extremely well built.  http://www.jespersenboats.com/distant-drummer.html  To the best of my recollection.... They are asking about twice what she was going to sell for back then. 

That's not Drummer.

Wisp is a Two Tonner, Drummer was a 27.5 One Tonner - basically a Ganbare development.

The designer and bright finish was all they had in common. The broker is wrong about Wisp being a Davidson design - it's a Peterson, as can be seen at a glance.

Drummer was for sale on Salt Spring recently in very sad shape.

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20 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Wii O' The Wisp, AKA The Cedar Speeder - Peterson Two Tonner that has been expensively updated with carbon rig and T Keel.

Spectacularly beautiful boat that has been for sale here for about a decade. Last price I saw was $90-ish. Probably less than was spent on the updates.

She's still looking good and racing often. And raced well too - last time, just before covid hit, they were double handing that giant spinnaker.

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On 5/2/2020 at 1:09 PM, SloopJonB said:

I think that about a lot of food.

The first person to eat an oyster must have been very hungry.

Likewise escargot.

 

As a Frenchman, I resent that statement... for both !

 

;)

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On 5/7/2020 at 7:44 AM, Cruisin Loser said:

That's a great looking boat. I could never understand why the Sundeer types always had to be so ugly. 

That’s because Bob did not design them.

Bob does not do ugly.

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On 5/7/2020 at 10:44 AM, Cruisin Loser said:

I could never understand why the Sundeer types always had to be so ugly. 

I just took a look at some of them - they are ugly.

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15 minutes ago, Priscilla said:

Yup not exactly the cleanest of lines.

EED15651-FE63-402D-963C-3508CE094FC8.thumb.jpeg.07e8ad662ba10b7bbf5624d873ccb4c8.jpeg

I see what you did there. :D

They may be ugly but they are big.

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6 hours ago, LeoV said:

that last photo of whatever it is, gaff like... the screws used in the metal end fitting..... that is not right.

You forgot to moan about the dyneema parrel holding the gaff beads and the Uroxsys varnish.

EAD61ABB-6937-47FC-B4BF-C439F5FE3C95.thumb.jpeg.da87793c02e40dd5320a458f4af832dc.jpeg

 

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Not sure if this belongs here or in the Powerboat thread or the Covid threat. Music is ... well... the Durch like it. 

But the idea is cool and ... contemporary. 

I love the Netherlands, did I mention?

Look for the guy at 01h 07m. Spectecular production, in any case.

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2 hours ago, Priscilla said:

Air New Zealand teal variations.

C32A5678-3587-4213-90A6-A22FD91CCA82.jpeg.074943681084388140647e1874ea5713.jpeg

The one beside the guy is teal.

The rest are blue.

Here's the original for comparison. ;)

image.png.ee81d28c7421c82324b371afe73910e8.png

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I'm a big fan of Tom's designs. The pictures of Velella show many of the same features and layout as my Malaya. Please excuse the missing chimney, this is her summer outfit. 

small rear.jpg

small.jpg

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2 hours ago, Malaya said:

I'm a big fan of Tom's designs. The pictures of Velella show many of the same features and layout as my Malaya. Please excuse the missing chimney, this is her summer outfit. 

small rear.jpg

small.jpg

Could you perhaps tell a little more about your boat? Looks pretty cool.

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1 hour ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

1970 called and wants their clothes back.... 

Where I was in 1970 the skirts and dresses were a LOT shorter. Not to mention Hot Pants.

My wife says she was sent home from school one day for a skirt that failed to cover her panties when she sat. Given that she was a ballet dancer and track star, I wish I'd been there to see that. 

Ho-Pants-1971-1970-Fashion-Trends.thumb.jpg.53c787febc3473c9b42b990a90f474a4.jpg

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