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I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

My old Schooner "Europe". The first yacht registered under the brand new European Union flag. Baptised  by Princess Grace Kelly of Monaco. We acquired the boat after she went around the world. Thank y

Rozinante 16" X 20"  

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I really liked that film.  It was WAAAAYYYYY better than "All is Lost", which isn't saying much.  I thought it was well done.

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Herreshoff's 1938 BOUNTY made a stop in Rockport Harbor in 2010-12, en route between California (via the highway) and France.

Here, they replaced about a third of her framing, replanked,...and so on.

They don't leave until all the blue painter's tape is removed. 

1267600750_BOUNTY2012Rockport.thumb.jpg.6c11f2975af6b99a1c7e878436f6f53f.jpg

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I looked back at Wooden Boat magazine, and PANACEA was featured earlier than I thought. It was in #268, the May/June 2019 issue. Assuming that was a year after she was built and delivered, it's only been about three years. Now she's for sale. Seems odd that someone would have such a special boat built with so much thought, and only keep her for three years.

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Such a beauty.  Looks like she would be a blast to sail.  But really the first thing I think of is "SO much maintenance!"

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2 hours ago, Bull City said:

I looked back at Wooden Boat magazine, and PANACEA was featured earlier than I thought. It was in #268, the May/June 2019 issue. Assuming that was a year after she was built and delivered, it's only been about three years. Now she's for sale. Seems odd that someone would have such a special boat built with so much thought, and only keep her for three years.

Life has unexpected changes sometimes....maybe it's an estate sale, or there were health issues or the 'Rona' took out his biz or source of income, or...

At least someone pursued a dream and made it a reality.

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JAMBI is one of just two (I think) Hinckley Bermuda 50's. If I recall correctly, Hinckley announced their return to the sailboat world with the B50 around 2013. It took two years before one was built, and I think two may have been built simultaneously. And that was it unless I'm missing other B50's. 

There are more old Hinckley sailboats on the coast of Maine than you can shake a stick at. When these boats were unveiled, often Hinckley had more orders than they could fill. You had to wait. Most of the B40's were built in a 10-year span. We're almost closing on 10 years of life for the B50. 

I think the B50 is a good looking design. Current, fast, pointed in the front - wide in the back, today. Maybe a little pricey but that never stopped all the new boat buyers. They sell powerboats hand over fist in this price range. 

So what gives? Is it all the lack of the new sailboat buyer market or is it Hinckley's design? 

1641237027_Jambi--CelerityPulpitHarbor.thumb.jpg.c89c93c783a2334097d3007b8e25c49d.jpg

Destined to be a rare classic one day? 

41339407_B50(1of1).thumb.jpg.7721896ca9ad6b8d08bc1a06b2dd7990.jpg

 

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2 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

JAMBI is one of just two (I think) Hinckley Bermuda 50's. If I recall correctly, Hinckley announced their return to the sailboat world with the B50 around 2013. It took two years before one was built, and I think two may have been built simultaneously. And that was it unless I'm missing other B50's. 

There are more old Hinckley sailboats on the coast of Maine than you can shake a stick at. When these boats were unveiled, often Hinckley had more orders than they could fill. You had to wait. Most of the B40's were built in a 10-year span. We're almost closing on 10 years of life for the B50. 

I think the B50 is a good looking design. Current, fast, pointed in the front - wide in the back, today. Maybe a little pricey but that never stopped all the new boat buyers. They sell powerboats hand over fist in this price range. 

So what gives? Is it all the lack of the new sailboat buyer market or is it Hinckley's design? 

1641237027_Jambi--CelerityPulpitHarbor.thumb.jpg.c89c93c783a2334097d3007b8e25c49d.jpg

Destined to be a rare classic one day? 

41339407_B50(1of1).thumb.jpg.7721896ca9ad6b8d08bc1a06b2dd7990.jpg

 

Just like it was said when it was first announced - it looks like a typical Beneteau/Jenneau/Bavaria boat.   Row away factor = 0.

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1 hour ago, slap said:

Just like it was said when it was first announced - it looks like a typical Beneteau/Jenneau/Bavaria boat.   Row away factor = 0.

Which would you rather have?

image.png.a6db80ce255bb2ef61ab639ea7cd1cbb.pngimage.png.c4201f3f77a75a44e8c9a5ff25793dd3.png

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2 hours ago, slap said:

Just like it was said when it was first announced - it looks like a typical Beneteau/Jenneau/Bavaria boat.   Row away factor = 0.

The Hinckley sailboat business was buffeted by a combination of factors. Their customers vanished in a financial crisis, their image was skewed by the Picnic Boats,  there were changes in management, etc. One of the big things was that they had pushed their traditional designs about as far as they could and they didn't find a way to migrate to more modern style without losing their uniqueness. It might have been easier if they were building sailboats all the while, but they weren't.  

Is Morris still part of the same company? They have filled the niche that HInckley vacated which makes it all the more difficult.

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, slap said:

Just like it was said when it was first announced - it looks like a typical Beneteau/Jenneau/Bavaria boat.   Row away factor = 0.

I rather like it.  :)   But I am into modern.  Much like I would rather have the modern Bentley.   I can appreciate the beauty of the classics, but, I am grossly aware of what it takes to own and maintain one.  I would happily own that B-50 if they worked out the manufacturing issues.

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20 hours ago, slap said:

Just like it was said when it was first announced - it looks like a typical Beneteau/Jenneau/Bavaria boat.   Row away factor = 0.

Fair enough, but those sell(Bene, etc), right? And Hinckley used to have a pedigree, or something that many new boat buyers paid extra for. Maybe they lost that in all these down years. 

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17 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

The Hinckley sailboat business was buffeted by a combination of factors. Their customers vanished in a financial crisis, their image was skewed by the Picnic Boats,  there were changes in management, etc. One of the big things was that they had pushed their traditional designs about as far as they could and they didn't find a way to migrate to more modern style without losing their uniqueness. It might have been easier if they were building sailboats all the while, but they weren't.  

Is Morris still part of the same company? They have filled the niche that HInckley vacated which makes it all the more difficult.

 

 

 

They do still own Morris but Morris sailboats floundered too. Their Daysailers (DS line) held things together for a decade or so but they have lost steam as well, I think. 

The only fun is in the custom boats these days. 

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I think Hinckley have a Harley problem. They have a very strong brand equity for a certain kind of boat for a certain kind of sailing and that niche is well supplied by the used market.  The jet boats are common down here in Palm Beach, probably owned by people who once would have owned, or did own, a Hinckley sailboat. 

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22 minutes ago, Elegua said:

I think Hinckley have a Harley problem. They have a very strong brand equity for a certain kind of boat for a certain kind of sailing and that niche is well supplied by the used market.  The jet boats are common down here in Palm Beach, probably owned by people who once would have owned, or did own, a Hinckley sailboat. 

There is another part of the Harley/Hinckley problem, their customer base is just getting older and weeded out. Younger, rich sailors are not into Hinckley style and really why should they be. If you look at Cadillac, they have done a pretty successful job reinventing themselves from the time when they were selling to those 60+. Look at their ads these days, they are aimed for those in their 30's who might otherwise buy a BMW or similar.

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On 2/13/2021 at 8:27 AM, Kris Cringle said:

JAMBI is one of just two (I think) Hinckley Bermuda 50's. If I recall correctly, Hinckley announced their return to the sailboat world with the B50 around 2013. It took two years before one was built, and I think two may have been built simultaneously. And that was it unless I'm missing other B50's. 

There are more old Hinckley sailboats on the coast of Maine than you can shake a stick at. When these boats were unveiled, often Hinckley had more orders than they could fill. You had to wait. Most of the B40's were built in a 10-year span. We're almost closing on 10 years of life for the B50. 

I think the B50 is a good looking design. Current, fast, pointed in the front - wide in the back, today. Maybe a little pricey but that never stopped all the new boat buyers. They sell powerboats hand over fist in this price range. 

So what gives? Is it all the lack of the new sailboat buyer market or is it Hinckley's design? 

1641237027_Jambi--CelerityPulpitHarbor.thumb.jpg.c89c93c783a2334097d3007b8e25c49d.jpg

Destined to be a rare classic one day? 

41339407_B50(1of1).thumb.jpg.7721896ca9ad6b8d08bc1a06b2dd7990.jpg

 

I like it.

It's a bit more refined than the BeneHuntaLina modern box-boats. Nicer looking, more graceful proportions. But not clearly superior, nothing about this boat smugly says "old money" when you park it next to one of pizza-wedge new crop of racer-cruisers. Of course, that's a difficult aesthetic to achieve.

FB- Doug

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 Hinckley is no longer a sailboat company  filled with sailors. Yeah, there are sailors in their brokerage department, but building great sailboats is no longer their mission. Building and servicing motorboats is. 

Their Portsmouth yard is still really the old Ted Hood yard' servicing the BIG boats. 

It didn't help that Jambi was DFL on corrected time in her only Marion-Bermuda. 

In the time that Jambi has been around, BBY has been building Spirit of Tradition customs and semi-customs like Blackfish and Outlier that are specific to their owners use patterns.

21 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

Their customers vanished in a financial crisis

 

Baloney.  There's more rich people with more money than ever.

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37 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

 Hinckley is no longer a sailboat company  filled with sailors. Yeah, there are sailors in their brokerage department, but building great sailboats is no longer their mission. Building and servicing motorboats is. 

Their Portsmouth yard is still really the old Ted Hood yard' servicing the BIG boats. 

It didn't help that Jambi was DFL on corrected time in her only Marion-Bermuda. 

In the time that Jambi has been around, BBY has been building Spirit of Tradition customs and semi-customs like Blackfish and Outlier that are specific to their owners use patterns.

Baloney.  There's more rich people with more money than ever.

Do you think the overall decline of sailing is an issue for Hinckley? I imagine so.

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3 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

If you look at Cadillac, they have done a pretty successful job reinventing themselves from the time when they were selling to those 60+. Look at their ads these days, they are aimed for those in their 30's who might otherwise buy a BMW or similar.

I remember a story about Caddy from a few decades ago.

The brand manager pointed out to the top people that the average Caddy buyer was something like 60 years old - essentially the average owner would never buy another and that they had to do something to change that.

Complacency can kill.

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44 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Do you think the overall decline of sailing is an issue for Hinckley? I imagine so.

No. They already transitioned to being a motorboat company. 

Rich people don't buy 40-50'ers anymore, unless they're daysailors or one-offs. They buy 80' and up. Swan and Oyster went with that market. 

As markets change, companies adapt or die. Hinckley adapted to the motorboat market. So did Sabre. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

No. They already transitioned to being a motorboat company. 

Rich people don't buy 40-50'ers anymore, unless they're daysailors or one-offs. They buy 80' and up. Swan and Oyster went with that market. 

As markets change, companies adapt or die. Hinckley adapted to the motorboat market. So did Sabre. 

Probably a good thing, in that it leaves a lot of nice used boats for the peasants.

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062015BTSN-6466-cropped-1280x853.jpg

2.45 MILLION DOLLARS???

Finot-Conq-FC3-53-boat-test-running-shot

ca. 2 million dollars.

x-yachts-x4-9-boat-test-aft-running-shot

ca. 600k dollars.

I could see why someone would pay a premium on the FC 53 (you don't), but what's the excess benefit of the Hinckley over the X?

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11 minutes ago, Matagi said:

062015BTSN-6466-cropped-1280x853.jpg

2.45 MILLION DOLLARS???

Finot-Conq-FC3-53-boat-test-running-shot

ca. 2 million dollars.

x-yachts-x4-9-boat-test-aft-running-shot

ca. 600k dollars.

I could see why someone would pay a premium on the FC 53 (you don't), but what's the excess benefit of the Hinckley over the X?

Hinckley caters to the 'Grey Poupon' crowd.  If image is important, then you 'might' consider a Hinckley and you WILL pay a huge premium for that feeling of taste, grandeur and superiority.   Interestingly, the peons(and peers) who will be impressed are actually mostly located in New England with a subset in FL.  It's a small and shrinking market...

Yes, it's much like Cadillac.... do people even buy them anymore?

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53 minutes ago, Veeger said:

Yes, it's much like Cadillac.... do people even buy them anymore?

They buy big trucks from Caddy now - Escalades are big with realtors and the like.

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2 hours ago, Veeger said:

Hinckley caters to the 'Grey Poupon' crowd.  If image is important, then you 'might' consider a Hinckley and you WILL pay a huge premium for that feeling of taste, grandeur and superiority.   Interestingly, the peons(and peers) who will be impressed are actually mostly located in New England with a subset in FL.  It's a small and shrinking market...

Yes, it's much like Cadillac.... do people even buy them anymore?

I disagree completely, but am probably far less knowledgeable on the subject. 

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25 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I disagree completely, but am probably far less knowledgeable on the subject. 

A veddy British level of self deprecation. :D

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1 hour ago, viktor said:

Does anyone have any info on the little gray boat? Looks kind of like a Crocker Stone Horse,  only larger. 

This one?

image.thumb.png.0cd0b1839133fc11efc85ad9132fe6cc.png

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Yesterday I noticed a (the?) Bob Perry designed catamaran (43') tied up on the end finger of the DSS (Hobart). Interesting design... would never be mistaken for a F-pajot or Laggon etc. that's for sure

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11 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

No. They already transitioned to being a motorboat company. 

Rich people don't buy 40-50'ers anymore, unless they're daysailors or one-offs. They buy 80' and up. Swan and Oyster went with that market. 

As markets change, companies adapt or die. Hinckley adapted to the motorboat market. So did Sabre. 

 

 

I think a good part of it is that people these days (the rich enough 20 to 40 or so somethings) don't actually want to "put up with the compromises" of having to actually sail (or drive for that matter).  It is similar to the proliferation of shift paddles and auto-rev matched downshifts, or "sport mode" on their exhausts that spit and "backfire" on overrun with the touch of a button.  The want to appear to be cool, without ever having to spend the time and effort to learn how to "heel and toe" with a manual transmission, or live with a highly tuned engine that doesn't like to trundle thru rush hour traffic.  Its a modern BMW (with is no longer the "ultimate driving machine" vs. an E30 M3.  They are "pretenders" in my mind.  So they (for the most part) want to appear to "live the sailing lifestyle" without having to sacrifice anything to actually sail.  There is, as CL has said, almost no marker for a traditional 40-50 foot real, live, actual sailboat.  The ones that care enough about that are buying spirit of tradition, the rest?  They are buying an automated, self tacking, fully furling, totally climate controlled pretend sailboats...

Sigh...:(

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7 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I disagree completely, but am probably far less knowledgeable on the subject. 

Oh...crap!  You mean I was actually supposed to be KNOWLEDGABLE about this subject?????   Sheesh... who knew?   It was just an anecdotal sample of ‘one’ opinion.

 

 

 

Knowledgeable... hmph...   Whatever is this world coming to???

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6 minutes ago, Veeger said:

Oh...crap!  You mean I was actually supposed to be KNOWLEDGABLE about this subject?????   Sheesh... who knew?   It was just an anecdotal sample of ‘one’ opinion.

 

 

 

Knowledgeable... hmph...   Whatever is this world coming to???

Why is it so warm? And why am I sitting in this handbasket?

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2 hours ago, Crash said:

I think a good part of it is that people these days (the rich enough 20 to 40 or so somethings) don't actually want to "put up with the compromises" of having to actually sail (or drive for that matter).  It is similar to the proliferation of shift paddles and auto-rev matched downshifts, or "sport mode" on their exhausts that spit and "backfire" on overrun with the touch of a button.  The want to appear to be cool, without ever having to spend the time and effort to learn how to "heel and toe" with a manual transmission, or live with a highly tuned engine that doesn't like to trundle thru rush hour traffic.  Its a modern BMW (with is no longer the "ultimate driving machine" vs. an E30 M3.  They are "pretenders" in my mind.  So they (for the most part) want to appear to "live the sailing lifestyle" without having to sacrifice anything to actually sail.  There is, as CL has said, almost no marker for a traditional 40-50 foot real, live, actual sailboat.  The ones that care enough about that are buying spirit of tradition, the rest?  They are buying an automated, self tacking, fully furling, totally climate controlled pretend sailboats... 

Sigh...

A couple of years ago (pre-C19) when I was selling my blue-water yacht, there were  few potential buyers. As my broker said, people aren't cruising anymore, backed up by the number of yacht port-entries in popular cruising grounds, down 30% over a decade ago.

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53 minutes ago, Fleetwood said:

A couple of years ago (pre-C19) when I was selling my blue-water yacht, there were  few potential buyers. As my broker said, people aren't cruising anymore, backed up by the number of yacht port-entries in popular cruising grounds, down 30% over a decade ago.

Maybe because fees have gone up and people are sleeping outside at anchor?

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7 hours ago, Veeger said:

Oh...crap!  You mean I was actually supposed to be KNOWLEDGABLE about this subject?????   Sheesh... who knew?   It was just an anecdotal sample of ‘one’ opinion.

 

 

 

Knowledgeable... hmph...   Whatever is this world coming to???

I think it's about half and half (from what I'm told,...). I don't think any production boat started, quite as well built as Hinckley's did. But that extra or overbuild wasn't that much higher than good quality at other yards. But that makes a difference in ultimate value.

 

Then on the parts or building components - the same. Hinckley didn't spare $$ on the bits and pieces that really show their value after decades of use and abuse. 

 

But the other half is undeniable. Part of the Hinckely mystique on this coast is fed by the high level of maintenance many Hinckley owners are driven to. It's like crack cocaine. :) If you're in Northeast Harbor and your B40 doesn't look newer than the day it was built, some owners start to shake a little,.... 

 

Once the Hinckley is removed from it's natural environment, and the means to keep it looking 'new' every season, the value drops. But back to #1, it will still hold a higher value up until the point it becomes full housing. 

 

On a group of DIY fiberglass boat owners, some guy complained about his B40 and sold it. He was complaining about the wide side decks!! Apparently, he had back problems from  the long reach required to put the dishes away beneath the wide decks. This new 'cruiser' that buys a boat for housing first,  is certain death for all sailboats, even Hinckley's. 

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On 2/13/2021 at 8:27 AM, Kris Cringle said:

JAMBI is one of just two (I think) Hinckley Bermuda 50's. If I recall correctly, Hinckley announced their return to the sailboat world with the B50 around 2013. It took two years before one was built, and I think two may have been built simultaneously. And that was it unless I'm missing other B50's. 

There are more old Hinckley sailboats on the coast of Maine than you can shake a stick at. When these boats were unveiled, often Hinckley had more orders than they could fill. You had to wait. Most of the B40's were built in a 10-year span. We're almost closing on 10 years of life for the B50. 

I think the B50 is a good looking design. Current, fast, pointed in the front - wide in the back, today. Maybe a little pricey but that never stopped all the new boat buyers. They sell powerboats hand over fist in this price range. 

So what gives? Is it all the lack of the new sailboat buyer market or is it Hinckley's design? 

1641237027_Jambi--CelerityPulpitHarbor.thumb.jpg.c89c93c783a2334097d3007b8e25c49d.jpg

Destined to be a rare classic one day? 

41339407_B50(1of1).thumb.jpg.7721896ca9ad6b8d08bc1a06b2dd7990.jpg

 

I anchored next to the grey boat aft of the hinckley in Dark Harbor a couple of years back. Super nice guy. He built that boat himself. I want to say it’s a Crocker design, but for some reason I remember talking about Bud Macintosh.  

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3 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

But the other half is undeniable. Part of the Hinckely mystique on this coast is fed by the high level of maintenance many Hinckley owners are driven to. It's like crack cocaine. :) If you're in Northeast Harbor and your B40 doesn't look newer than the day it was built, some owners start to shake a little,.... 

Once the Hinckley is removed from it's natural environment, and the means to keep it looking 'new' every season, the value drops. But back to #1, it will still hold a higher value up until the point it becomes full housing.

There's truth in that but there's more to it than that as well.

Hinckleys are rare on the wet coast but I know of at least one B40 in Steveston. It was in a "typical" maintenance condition but it still reeked of quality.

And it didn't even have a dark blue hull. ;)

It was like an old Rolls that needed washing & waxing.

Which reminds me of a comment from years ago about Royces that I think fits the "Hinckley mentality" that is being described here.

The writer said that "a Royce is a perfect example of what flawless craftsmanship and a cost is no object philosophy can do for a 1937 Packard".

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18 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

This one?

image.thumb.png.0cd0b1839133fc11efc85ad9132fe6cc.png

I looked through the aptly named Sam Crocker's Boats. There are two that look pretty much like this. 

Sparhawk, design #253 from 1940. Bottom pic.

Gull, design #304 from 1956. Top pic.

Very similar boats. I first thought it was Sparhawk because of the slightly longer bowsprit, but reading the text, Gull is more likely because it was the newer design and apparently quite popular. 

I am unable to see any detail on the chainplate treatment in the drawings. None of Crocker's drawings show anything on the exterior. 

 

 

Gull_s.jpg

Sparhawk_s.jpg

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Actually , Hinckley owners deserve, in a small way, the mocking they receive., just for getting such cool boasts. 

My SW-42 was a simply incredible coastal and sea boat, given that you understood her mission.

She has an unabashed sailboat hull. She's like a big Etchells 22, but with a perfectly balanced helm, courtesy of the same guy who drew Carina. She was not built to entertain at the dock. Those boats are built to sail, and mine took me to Bermuda 4 times, sometimes in entertaining fashion, but never with any concern at all as to the strength of the boat.  As for a coastal cruiser, she's like  Kris's Christmas, just a simple, perfect, gorgeous boat. I could have had a much bigger boat for less money, but she was 42' of nautical perfection. 

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20 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Actually , Hinckley owners deserve, in a small way, the mocking they receive., just for getting such cool boasts. 

Is that why you sold yours then?

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Semi,  Good info, It looks to me to be Gull also, mostly due to the small raised cuddy. Thanks for the information.  Hi Jack... over. Back to Hinckley.  :)

 

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5 hours ago, Crash said:

No, he's got an even cooler boat now!

About that...

I some how came across some story of a rescue at sea. Still can’t figure out how the end of it played out. 

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14 hours ago, mgs said:

Is that why you sold yours then?

I didn't sell her.

i parted with her because I could no longer handle the feelings of guilt and inadequacy that came with owning her. 

I knew I wasn't a REAL Hinckley owner. I wasn't born into the New England aristocracy, I only have one middle name. I actually  WORK. I could feel the stares, hear the whispers whenever we anchored or docked. "They don't belong here", "they're really ordinary people, not one of us". Even the gulls seemed to be laughing at us. 

I knew I just wasn't good enough. I cracked. 

No, I don't have a Hinckley anymore, but for me, for my family, the shame lingers. 

B)

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5 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I didn't sell her.

i parted with her because I could no longer handle the feelings of guilt and inadequacy that came with owning her. 

 I knew I wasn't a REAL Hinckley owner. I wasn't born into the New England aristocracy, I only have one middle name. I actually  WORK. I could feel the stares, hear the whispers whenever we anchored or docked. "They don't belong here", "they're really ordinary people, not one of us". Even the gulls seemed to be laughing at us. 

I knew I just wasn't good enough. I cracked. 

 No, I don't have a Hinckley anymore, but for me, for my family, the shame lingers

 B)

This movie would end with you driving your boat at full speed into a pack of anchoring Hinckley's, screaming madly from the helm into the surprised owners' faces:

'Look what you made me do, LOOK WHAT YOU MADE ME CHRHRHHRCHCHCHBOOOMM'.

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54 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

 

No, I don't have a Hinckley anymore, but for me, for my family, the shame lingers. 

B)

keep your head up you’ll get through it

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7 hours ago, mgs said:

About that...

I some how came across some story of a rescue at sea. Still can’t figure out how the end of it played out. 

CL finds a boat out in the ocean.   Somehow now CL is in possession of it.

 

Piracy?  

Arrrrrrr.

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I didn't sell her.

i parted with her because I could no longer handle the feelings of guilt and inadequacy that came with owning her. 

I knew I wasn't a REAL Hinckley owner. I wasn't born into the New England aristocracy, I only have one middle name. I actually  WORK. I could feel the stares, hear the whispers whenever we anchored or docked. "They don't belong here", "they're really ordinary people, not one of us". Even the gulls seemed to be laughing at us. 

I knew I just wasn't good enough. I cracked. 

No, I don't have a Hinckley anymore, but for me, for my family, the shame lingers. 

B)

You may have made a mistake. The, "best", Hinckley's are multi-generational. The first generation makes it and buys it, the second generation maintains it, and the third generation spends it and sells it. Your kids are smart and work hard, but who knows about their kids? 

Maybe you can try with Restive. A much better boat, but perhaps less marketing. 

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1 hour ago, Matagi said:

This movie would end with you driving your boat at full speed into a pack of anchoring Hinckley's, screaming madly from the helm into the surprised owners' faces:

'Look what you made me do, LOOK WHAT YOU MADE ME CHRHRHHRCHCHCHBOOOMM'.

That happened in Camden Harbor. :)  The peeps in the 'regular' boat, didn't know the local hazards: You always give a Hinckley driver taking a selfie, the right of way.

Everybody knows that... 

2055045750_Hinckleycrunch.jpg.8d7dd5f946c8ae7fd565483f3e11b153.jpg

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2 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I knew I wasn't a REAL Hinckley owner. I wasn't born into the New England aristocracy, I only have one middle name. I actually  WORK. I could feel the stares, hear the whispers whenever we anchored or docked. "They don't belong here", "they're really ordinary people, not one of us". Even the gulls seemed to be laughing at us. 

CL, that snooty attitude to you reminds me of the attitude by the more old-fashioned British Tories to the senior minister Michael Heseltine.  Heseltine was was a self-made multi-millionaire, but was dismissed by the diarist Alan Clark as "the kind of person who bought his own furniture".

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14 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

That happened in Camden Harbor. :)  The peeps in the 'regular' boat, didn't know the local hazards: You always give a Hinckley driver taking a selfie, the right of way.

Everybody knows that... 

2055045750_Hinckleycrunch.jpg.8d7dd5f946c8ae7fd565483f3e11b153.jpg

If you don't have personnel to take your selfie, ... tu n'est pas arrivé.

...Love it. Life, always finds a way to beat fantasy.

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26 minutes ago, slap said:

CL finds a boat out in the ocean.   Somehow now CL is in possession of it.

 

Piracy?  

Arrrrrrr.

In the slanderously warped movie version, CL cunningly arranges for the the boat to be sabotaged before CL "coincidentally" appears as the sparky rescuer.

The actual sabotage is done by a cunning, bitter, little man from south-eastern Europe with a tragic backstory, because that's what is required by the Laws of Movies.

There is also a doomed love triangle somewhere in the story.

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13 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

That happened in Camden Harbor. :)  The peeps in the 'regular' boat, didn't know the local hazards: You always give a Hinckley driver taking a selfie, the right of way.

Everybody knows that... 

2055045750_Hinckleycrunch.jpg.8d7dd5f946c8ae7fd565483f3e11b153.jpg

Was Rebecca in the charter fleet at the time?

 

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15 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

That happened in Camden Harbor. :)  The peeps in the 'regular' boat, didn't know the local hazards: You always give a Hinckley driver taking a selfie, the right of way.

Everybody knows that... 

2055045750_Hinckleycrunch.jpg.8d7dd5f946c8ae7fd565483f3e11b153.jpg

Aren't the regular boat people supposed to be honoured that it was a Hinckley which t-boned them?

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6 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Was Rebecca in the charter fleet at the time?

 

I don't know. This was taken from Wayfarer some years ago. I don't know that he was taking a selfie,...but he could have been and had slipped his phone in his pants before somebody got the shot. 

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44 minutes ago, slap said:

CL finds a boat out in the ocean.   Somehow now CL is in possession of it. 

That's perfect. 

 

2 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

I don't know. This was taken from Wayfarer some years ago. I don't know that he was taking a selfie,...but he could have been and had slipped his phone in his pants before somebody got the shot. 

She was in the charter fleet for years. Wouldn't surprise me at all if it were a charterer at the wheel.  Probably just turned his head for a second to look at a really cool boat.

 

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14 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

That's perfect. 

 

She was in the charter fleet for years. Wouldn't surprise me at all if it were a charterer at the wheel.  Probably just turned his head for a second to look at a really cool boat.

 

Probably, many of the Hinckley's are in charter. But I look to the tender to often give that away. I notice some of the charters have a beater dinghy and usually a small HP outboard. This one looks serious. Then again, it's hip towed which is strange, kinda like the guy forgot about it. 

 

This H Pilot was either on charter or the owner was trying to look like a local to make friends? :)

1201283512_Pilotlaundry(1of1).thumb.jpg.56c22de045a3e7503c4bb5170761eabd.jpg

This (below) was in Camden Harbor quite a few years ago. The upwind B40 ran his diesel for an hour charging. Just 10' downwind, the guy in the other B40 kept coughing but sucked it up. I liked to think it was brand loyalty. :) Camden is (as you know) a great harbor to people watch. 

1392179122_Hinckleycharging.thumb.jpg.5897c801f65f9212a66660108da14b3e.jpg

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

CL, that snooty attitude to you reminds me of the attitude by the more old-fashioned British Tories to the senior minister Michael Heseltine.  Heseltine was was a self-made multi-millionaire, but was dismissed by the diarist Alan Clark as "the kind of person who bought his own furniture".

I've always been amused by those attitudes.

The longer it's been since anyone in your family did anything useful, the higher your status.

If great, great, great grandad made the money they you are obviously superior to someone who's great grandad made it.

If if you (horrors!) actually made it yourself then you're little more than a barrow boy.

If you make enough money they'll grant you hangaround status but will let you know in a myriad ways that you are merely being tolerated.

And nobody but nobody can do snotty condescension like a Brit with a good accent.

Read a great story that perfectly illustrates it. The writer was on his largish, self maintained sailboat in a marina in the Med. right beside a perfect, fully crewed 60' sailboat. A woman from the big boat stopped to chat and as she left she said "it must be so relaxing to not care about the appearance of one's yacht".

Why anybody would want to associate with them eludes me - most of them don't even have a lot of money anymore, they just act like it.

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3 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I didn't sell her.

i parted with her because I could no longer handle the feelings of guilt and inadequacy that came with owning her. 

I knew I wasn't a REAL Hinckley owner. I wasn't born into the New England aristocracy, I only have one middle name. I actually  WORK. I could feel the stares, hear the whispers whenever we anchored or docked. "They don't belong here", "they're really ordinary people, not one of us". Even the gulls seemed to be laughing at us. 

I knew I just wasn't good enough. I cracked. 

No, I don't have a Hinckley anymore, but for me, for my family, the shame lingers. 

B)

Thoughts and prayers for you for that difficult time.

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34 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Probably, many of the Hinckley's are in charter. But I look to the tender to often give that away. I notice some of the charters have a beater dinghy and usually a small HP outboard. This one looks serious. Then again, it's hip towed which is strange, kinda like the guy forgot about it. 

 

This H Pilot was either on charter or the owner was trying to look like a local to make friends? :)

1201283512_Pilotlaundry(1of1).thumb.jpg.56c22de045a3e7503c4bb5170761eabd.jpg

This (below) was in Camden Harbor quite a few years ago. The upwind B40 ran his diesel for an hour charging. Just 10' downwind, the guy in the other B40 kept coughing but sucked it up. I liked to think it was brand loyalty. :) Camden is (as you know) a great harbor to people watch. 

1392179122_Hinckleycharging.thumb.jpg.5897c801f65f9212a66660108da14b3e.jpg

 

 

 

 

Camden is an interesting place with all the tourists and cattle-boats. My daughter used to make us promise to stop there at least once each Summer.  She always knew what new restaurants were the places to eat and we would dutifully get in line with her.  We were there for the ice cream. 

We tended to hang out the laundry too, but we aren't burdened by sailing a Hinckley  /s 

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38 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

Thoughts and prayers for you for that difficult time.

Thanks, means a lot to us.B)

1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

CL, that snooty attitude to you reminds me of the attitude by the more old-fashioned British Tories to the senior minister Michael Heseltine.  Heseltine was was a self-made multi-millionaire, but was dismissed by the diarist Alan Clark as "the kind of person who bought his own furniture".

Shit. That sounds almost real. My story was totally fabricated. Our fellow Hinckley owners nearly all made their own money, and we were always going boat to boat for drinks and to check out different ideas. Great people, still friends with a bunch. 

A couple of them crew for us in the classic races. Fine sailors, who sometimes turn the tables and buy dinner for the skipper. 

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28 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

 

A couple of them crew for us in the classic races. Fine sailors, who sometimes turn the tables and buy dinner for the skipper. 

That’s a dangerous precedent, better not tell too many people. 
 

there’s a rumor of new classics race shaping up in Boothbay Harbor. If you show up I’ll at least give you something resembling beer

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Just now, mgs said:

That’s a dangerous precedent, better not tell too many people. 
 

there’s a rumor of new classics race shaping up in Boothbay Harbor. If you show up I’ll at least give you something resembling beer

 

That's not a rumor. I got an email from the CYOA (Classic Yacht Owners Association) announcing it. It's on the calendar July 24-25. No idea if we'll make it. Hell, we still don't know if the Marion-Bermuda race is happening. If it does, I don't know if any of my crew want to go. 

I'm guessing if we do Boothbay I can get Elegua to crew, he moors there. 

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56 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

And nobody but nobody can do snotty condescension like a Brit with a good accent.

Read a great story that perfectly illustrates it. The writer was on his largish, self maintained sailboat in a marina in the Med. right beside a perfect, fully crewed 60' sailboat. A woman from the big boat stopped to chat and as she left she said "it must be so relaxing to not care about the appearance of one's yacht".

Why anybody would want to associate with them eludes me - most of them don't even have a lot of money anymore, they just act like it.

Yes, the posh Brits are the masters of condescension.  Tho some French people give it a pretty good go.

Most of those posh Brits no longer have much disposable income, since rural land is no longer a major revenue generator.  But the genius of the British upper class is its ability to renew itself by co-opting new money, which is why the whole peerage system remains in place more than two centuries after the industrial rich began to appear on the scene.  One of the functions of the snobbery is to ensure that the newly rich will trade their money for a share of the status, as in the notorious 1895 marriage of Consuelo Vanderbilt to the  9th Duke of Marlborough.

Most of them are fairly grim company, with nothing to commend them except their own sense of entitlement.

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We're having internet issues here in frozen Texas. When I first saw your post it was repeated 4 times. When it was fixed I hid my snark-ass post. 

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20 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

 

That's not a rumor. I got an email from the CYOA (Classic Yacht Owners Association) announcing it. It's on the calendar July 24-25. No idea if we'll make it. Hell, we still don't know if the Marion-Bermuda race is happening. If it does, I don't know if any of my crew want to go. 

I'm guessing if we do Boothbay I can get Elegua to crew, he moors there. 

Just tell me where and when....

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1 hour ago, mgs said:

Well hell, I’ll volunteer if you need crew

Just a few posts up you were intimating that I may be a sketchy character. That's a good instinct and you should probably trust it.

I just got an invite for the Fastnet on a great boat with great folks. My schedule is suddenly in flux. 

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4 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

The longer it's been since anyone in your family did anything useful, the higher your status.

If great, great, great grandad made the money they you are obviously superior to someone who's great grandad made it.

If if you (horrors!) actually made it yourself then you're little more than a barrow boy.

What happens if your children make more money than you did?:o:o

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Then they are the new start of the family dynasty and it will be several generations before the family status counts. :D

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4 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I've always been amused by those attitudes.

The longer it's been since anyone in your family did anything useful, the higher your status.

If great, great, great grandad made the money they you are obviously superior to someone who's great grandad made it.

If if you (horrors!) actually made it yourself then you're little more than a barrow boy.

If you make enough money they'll grant you hangaround status but will let you know in a myriad ways that you are merely being tolerated.

And nobody but nobody can do snotty condescension like a Brit with a good accent.

Read a great story that perfectly illustrates it. The writer was on his largish, self maintained sailboat in a marina in the Med. right beside a perfect, fully crewed 60' sailboat. A woman from the big boat stopped to chat and as she left she said "it must be so relaxing to not care about the appearance of one's yacht".

Why anybody would want to associate with them eludes me - most of them don't even have a lot of money anymore, they just act like it.

You should try cruising New England in an asymmetrical multihull sailboat. The best comment I heard (while hiding below) was "I always wanted to be different....but not like that".

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8 minutes ago, Bull City said:
4 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

If if you (horrors!) actually made it yourself then you're little more than a barrow boy.

What happens if your children make more money than you did?:o:o

I think the logic is that it's okay for your children to make money, because they have the "breeding", so by definition they can't be nouveau riche.

Unless, of course, your children do something vulgar like commerce or (whisper it) manufacturing.

The most acceptable ways of making money seems to be horse-breeding and financial speculation in the City of London.

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Just a few posts up you were intimating that I may be a sketchy character. That's a good instinct and you should probably trust it.

I just got an invite for the Fastnet on a great boat with great folks. My schedule is suddenly in flux. 

Go for it! There will plenty of time to patch everything together, later.

FB- Doug

 

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Just a few posts up you were intimating that I may be a sketchy character. That's a good instinct and you should probably trust it.

I just got an invite for the Fastnet on a great boat with great folks. My schedule is suddenly in flux.