Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I never noticed that the Spirit 54 in the movie had no stanchions and lifelines installed.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 14.6k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

Check out this centre cockpit, kauri composite 52' Ketch, designed by Laurie Davidson. This boat could have very long legs. For sale in Brisbane, QLD, Australia: https://www.boatsonline.com.au/bo

Posted Images

8 hours ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

Speaking of Venice, James Bond's yacht is for sale.

james-bond-yacht-011.jpg

 

 

Something not quite right to the eye about that cabin trunk and port lights

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

I never noticed that the Spirit 54 in the movie had no stanchions and lifelines installed.

Well. You only live twice, so...

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/22/2021 at 11:06 PM, Kris Cringle said:

It reminds me of the $1 boat. Designed by P. Rhodes, the rudder looks impossible. But it seems to work. 

Well, look at this rudder, it is as much elevator as rudder. Historical data suggests it worked.rgrdgrdgdgrd.JPG.7ac0cdd1de2dfe958cb3df264cdd2db3.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/28/2021 at 9:05 PM, TwoLegged said:

That's mostly because those boat are very narrow.  There is now way that those barn door rudders so far fwd are as efficient as a spade well aft.

Of course, you have to evaluate the rudder position with respect to the LWL and ignore the long overhangs. But designers certainly were aware the rudders were too far forward  and rudder posts were too slanted but the important racing rules plus tradition made it hard to change.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a 1934 Starling Burgess cutter with an almost plumb bow. "Little Dipper could easily be mistaken for a 19th century English cutter," according to the ad copy. To me, the bow and boxy deckhouse look like modern interpretations of traditional boats. Is this the chicken or the egg or the chick? Whatever it is, I think it's cool.

https://rockportmarine.com/brokerage/41-1934-starling-burgess-cutter/

image.thumb.png.c724c178f3445414f81156c95e23db52.png

image.thumb.png.727edbcb2fb69538e76dac3576e85d1e.png

image.thumb.png.743eebebd55da375b5d4699a3fb48923.png

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Here is a 1934 Starling Burgess cutter with an almost plumb bow. "Little Dipper could easily be mistaken for a 19th century English cutter," according to the ad copy. To me, the bow and boxy deckhouse look like modern interpretations of traditional boats. Is this the chicken or the egg or the chick? Whatever it is, I think it's cool.

https://rockportmarine.com/brokerage/41-1934-starling-burgess-cutter/

image.thumb.png.c724c178f3445414f81156c95e23db52.png

image.thumb.png.727edbcb2fb69538e76dac3576e85d1e.png

image.thumb.png.743eebebd55da375b5d4699a3fb48923.png

Commissioned by Buckminster Fuller, apparently.

That's not too surprising.  Starling Burgess was one of the engineers Fuller hired to work on his Dymaxion Car.

20287308591_0e33d65934_b.thumb.jpg.601099ef95564630f3ee42306cd4e769.jpg

Here's a picture of the Dymaxion team with Starling Burgess at the wheel of the first chassis:

Dymaxion-Car-chass.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/1/2021 at 7:38 AM, bmiller said:

Just a couple zeros away from setting off around the world.

 

Looks like $1.8 million death trap with nice cushions to me. I hope they float!

743430774_ScreenShot2021-08-03at1_52_20PM.thumb.png.b73ef4c389ffda509a5a5525778d51c0.png

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/25/2021 at 5:45 PM, kimbottles said:

Our previous vessel TIOGA (IV) from the drafting board of K. Aage Nielsen. 

The family we sold her to visited us this weekend.

17F7C9F9-7D43-4988-846A-C61280A3320D.jpeg

@kimbottles With my boat out of the water, I am left with some winter pursuits, like thumbing through old issues of WoodenBoat magazine.

I've got no idea why I picked #205 (Nov/Dec 2008) within days of Kim posting this photo, but there is a very interesting and informative article about TIOGA and her history. Kim and SWMBO restored her yawl rig (she had been converted to a sloop).

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Bull City said:

Looks like $1.8 million death trap with nice cushions to me. I hope they float!

743430774_ScreenShot2021-08-03at1_52_20PM.thumb.png.b73ef4c389ffda509a5a5525778d51c0.png

Pah.  Who needs floating when you got a shrubbery in the cockpit?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Bull City said:

In the cockpit?

 

 

Maybe they brought the shrubbery to counter-act the offset companionway?

There may be a Nobel prize in it, if this works......

FB- Doug

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/2/2021 at 8:13 PM, Ishmael said:

Are you planning on shrinking to 5' tall?

After he cuts an arm and both legs off to pay for it, he'll have plenty of headroom.

Whoops, sorry -- too soon!

:o

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

This is an admittedly awkward snapshot of a cool boat I found myself admiring  at the fuel docks in cottage country today.

C6511744-86B7-45AD-93C4-EE736ABC3C17.thumb.jpeg.a2f6654023f60200010d1c6cbdbb5a5b.jpeg

The Frauscher Mirage 747. 
 

After all these threads bitching about build quality, it sure was nice to see this level of dedicated craftsmanship up close.

http://frauscherboats.com
 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/8/2020 at 1:46 PM, Matagi said:

Koopmans Ontwerp 513 'Bel Ami'.

Bit unusual to see the cockpit coamings turn straight into the deckhouse, but I like it very very much. 

Also how they kept the stern closed.

1018-271-999-f3e.jpg

1018-270-999-r6x.jpg

 

1018-269-999-h5t.jpg

1018-272-999-v6j.jpg

Hi Matagi,

i have, so far, been a lurker on the “cool boats” thread. The day before yesterday I was reading your post about Bel Ami. Yesterday, we went to Ostend with our boat from Flushing. I was assigned a berth by the harbourmaster, and when I arrived there it happened to be the one next to Bel Ami. This must be my Karma… ;-)
All I can say, is that in the flesh she is even prettier than on your pictures. I felt her out a little bit and she appears very stable to me.

Splashtest

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Splashtestdummy said:

Hi Matagi,

i have, so far, been a lurker on the “cool boats” thread. The day before yesterday I was reading your post about Bel Ami. Yesterday, we went to Ostend with our boat from Flushing. I was assigned a berth by the harbourmaster, and when I arrived there it happened to be the one next to Bel Ami. This must be my Karma… ;-)
All I can say, is that in the flesh she is even prettier than on your pictures. I felt her out a little bit and she appears very stable to me.

Splashtest

Great to hear that, she is a pretty design! Nice flashback to last years post, too :)

Pics are not mine, though, I just dug them up.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SemiSalt said:

A Tofinou 12 races with our Tuesday night fleet. Very elegant,  but also a bit odd looking, to me anyway.

It's got two wheels - what's odd about it? :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/23/2013 at 2:46 PM, Trickypig said:

 

Thanks for that Paps..

 

 

 

I just thought I'd post photos of the boats Great Red and Bob have mentioned... The `interesting' Midnight Lace (personally I'd rather chew my arm off..) and three Huckins models.

post-14496-0-78196200-1364064201_thumb.jpg

post-14496-0-25964000-1364064219_thumb.gif

post-14496-0-56203100-1364064230_thumb.jpg

post-14496-0-05566500-1364064239_thumb.jpg

   Sorry for commenting so late, but the top Huckins is one I restored, and am at the helm in the photo. What got my attention is the juxtaposition with the Lace, because I have always had some interest in those boats, and have had contracts on two 44s with the intention of doing a better than new restoration. It may say something that they all flunked survey! I am currently at the Huckins yard doing a full refit on my first powercat, with a 44 Lace having work done behind me. In the end, Bob’s comment about the umbrella drink boat may be valid, as well as my original thought (in the 80s) about Laces being replicas with the street cred of an Excalibur. 

     Best,

      Maldwin 

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

My old two tonner HEATHER designed for and built by John Buchan. Now a live aboard cruiser.

heather stern on.jpg

Seems like it would be claustrophobic as a live aboard cruiser, unless it has a lot of flatscreen TVs.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bull City said:

Seems like it would be claustrophobic as a live aboard cruiser, unless it has a lot of flatscreen TVs.

The owner told me last night that it was very cozy and that I should come visit next spring tide.

image.png.2ef1a5e612e802cd8e30bd32103af947.png

 

Sorry. I couldn't help it.

In all earnest: beautiful boat. I didn't know there was a two tonner in your portfolio, Bob.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Matagi said:

In all earnest: beautiful boat. I didn't know there was a two tonner in your portfolio, Bob.

AFAICR from what I read: the two-tonner Heather was accused of having killed IOR racing in the PNW, 'cos she won everything.   The IOR gave good credit for high freeboard, and @Bob Perry figured that since freeboard isn't so much of a negative in light airs and the PNW has a lot of light air, this was a good option to allow extra sail area.

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

My old two tonner HEATHER designed for and built by John Buchan. Now a live aboard cruiser.

heather stern on.jpg

James is a fellow guitarist and nut from Midland, TX. He's been to my home here, a fine guy.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well that was Bruce's grand idea. Make the boat light and fast enough that the IOR rule at the time couldn't penalize it enough.

Eventually they caught up with the DLF (Displacement Length Factor) and the party was over.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Zonker said:

Well that was Bruce's grand idea. Make the boat light and fast enough that the IOR rule at the time couldn't penalize it enough.

Eventually they caught up with the DLF (Displacement Length Factor) and the party was over.

And twenty-five years later, after IOR had died, new racing boats were more like Bruce Farr's designs than the "heavy beamies" (Bruce's term) which the IOR favoured.  

Basically, IOR's crapping on light fast boats killed the rule.  Poetic justice.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

And twenty-five years later, after IOR had died, new racing boats were more like Bruce Farr's designs than the "heavy beamies" (Bruce's term) which the IOR favoured.  

Basically, IOR's crapping on light fast boats killed the rule.  Poetic justice.

Lots of factors combined to kill the rule.  That certainly was one of them ;)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Penalizing speed producing factors always seemed like the wrong approach to me.

I can understand the thinking behind it but still...

Outlawing bulb style keels was probably the single dumbest part of that rule.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Penalizing speed producing factors always seemed like the wrong approach to me.

I can understand the thinking behind it but still...

Outlawing bulb style keels was probably the single dumbest part of that rule.

I think the worst of it was that the IOR actually penalised stability.  When Denis Doyle's final Moonduster was launched, she had too much stability to rate well, so they took lead out of the keel and screwed it to the headlining of the cabin.  Mad.

One of the bad results of that was that IOR boats needed lots of railmeat, which hobbled their suitability for cruising.  Keeping cruiser-racers competitive had been one of the aims of the IOR, but they undermined that.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The IOR rule wasn't designed specifically to penalize anything (except possibly dangerously light construction) - it was designed to quantify speed enhancing and detracting factors, which it actually did very well.  But since we are talking about stability, that was the one big loophole in the rule - not the effect of stability itself, but how it was measured.  The measurement was the righting moment at 1 degree, which is comprised of the CG effect (what was intended to be measured) and the transverse moment of inertia of the waterline plane, which was not measured but was assumed from the BWL and the assumption of a "normal" sort of shape.  If you could design a waterline plane with less transverse moment than was assumed by the rule (think diamond-shaped here) then you got a bit of a free ride on the CG effect.  I think that had a lot more to do with the diamond shape of IOR boats than the girth measurements that are usually blamed.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Matagi said:

Thank the Lord that we have left the IOR years behind and no one is destorting hulls any...wait what?

Flame away.

 

That boat reminds me of contemporary car shapes, where there is far too much design going on: pointless kinks and creases everywhere.  Created by CAD jockeys who should be told to go home or go the pub, but stop mangling a design just because the CAD tools make it easy to do so.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

That boat reminds me of contemporary car shapes, where there is far too much design going on: pointless kinks and creases everywhere.  Created by CAD jockeys who should be told to go home or go the pub, but stop mangling a design just because the CAD tools make it easy to do so.

Like VAG, BMW and Mercedes Benz to name a guilty few.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

That boat reminds me of contemporary car shapes, where there is far too much design going on: pointless kinks and creases everywhere.  Created by CAD jockeys who should be told to go home or go the pub, but stop mangling a design just because the CAD tools make it easy to do so.

The machete school of design.....

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, Sailbydate said:

Like VAG, BMW and Mercedes Benz to name a guilty few.

BMW started it under Chris Bangle, but I think the worst offender now is Toyota.  The wee Yaris was a brilliant little car with lots of room inside, but the latest one is over-designed and space has suffered.  Eejits.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, TwoLegged said:

BMW started it under Chris Bangle, but I think the worst offender now is Toyota.  The wee Yaris was a brilliant little car with lots of room inside, but the latest one is over-designed and space has suffered.  Eejits.

And good to see Honda has pulled back from the abyss, that was their previous, Civic Type R. ;-)

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

That boat reminds me of contemporary car shapes, where there is far too much design going on: pointless kinks and creases everywhere.  Created by CAD jockeys who should be told to go home or go the pub, but stop mangling a design just because the CAD tools make it easy to do so.

The thing I dislike the most in current car shapes is how angry or intimidating they try to look.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, slap said:

The thing I dislike the most in current car shapes is how angry or intimidating they try to look.

look at modern dirt bikes, sport bikes and snowmobiles....uniformly "angry insects"

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

They all look like they came out of video games.

That sort of design probably cross feeds between those two areas.

Personally I wish they'd go back to streamlining cars.

Streamlined cars, designed to go fast, arrive at Portland Art Museum  (photos, roll-in video) | OregonLive.com | Art deco car, Art museum,  Portland museumALFA ROMEO B.A.T. 5, ALFA ROMEO B.A.T. 7, ALFA ROMEO B.A.T. 9D |  Contemporary Art Evening Auction | Sotheby'sThe Greatest Cars of All Time: The SixtiesLamborghini Gallardo LP560-4 - Asphalt 9 Legends Database

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

At the time, we owned a 2000 Corvette which was not only shapely but very aero as well as being particularly light.  Scary fast with only 345HP.  (Never got it above 130 but it has still accerating hard when I backed off of the accerator) The lead designer for Ford came out quite critically about that design.  At the time Ford’s state of the art vehicle was the Ford GT which was directly styled after the FAILED 1964 Ford GT that Carrol Shelby had a heck of a time fixing.

Pretty incensed at the time, but look where everything has gone.  Wondering just how aero these new vehicles really are.  

Oh; Never got it above 130 but the fastest aircraft I ever had the pleasure to pilot was a Cutlass RG which cruised at something like 140.  Neither felt as fast as a Time Trial bike, going downhill on a rain slicked road at 40mph with a sharp curve coming up.  :D

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Santana20AE said:

Oh; Never got it above 130 but the fastest aircraft I ever had the pleasure to pilot was a Cutlass RG which cruised at something like 140.  Neither felt as fast as a Time Trial bike, going downhill on a rain slicked road at 40mph with a sharp curve coming up.  :D

Cutlass was a surprisingly fast airplane. The fact that it looked like an ordinary C172 contributed to the surprise. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Santana20AE said:

At the time Ford’s state of the art vehicle was the Ford GT which was directly styled after the FAILED 1964 Ford GT that Carrol Shelby had a heck of a time fixing.

Failed?

Won 4 straight years - '66, '67, '68 & '69. One car #1075 won it twice - the only car to ever do that.

The factory people weren't racers - that's why they needed Shelby to develop it, not because the car was a failure.

I'm not certain but I'm pretty sure the original GT was the single most successful car to ever race at Le Mans.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Failed?

Won 4 straight years - '66, '67, '68 & '69. One car #1075 won it twice - the only car to ever do that.

The factory people weren't racers - that's why they needed Shelby to develop it, not because the car was a failure.

I'm not certain but I'm pretty sure the original GT was the single most successful car to ever race at Le Mans.

Only three years, the Mark IV was a totally different vehicle than the GT40.  

You missed my point, it was a total failure UNTIL Carrol Shelby fixed it.  After that, still had issues with it getting 24 hours.  But yes, 1966, 1968, 1969 were all wins for the Shelby modified GT40.  

And don’t ever mistake this one fact, the Mark IV was, is and will always, remain one of my ALL TIME FAVORITE racing vehicles.  Dan and AJ, making everyone look really bad.  Classic!   

(And yall can keep the GT40)   

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

A festival of varnish

For $250,000 Kiwi roubles + sails I suppose the head must be in the aft hatch.

7631D074-E516-4002-AE15-AA75E3955352.thumb.jpeg.ecf8bf0454c23a27973321169fa8ff3e.jpeg
 

Nice lines from this angle and the double grunter on the stern would come in handy though whilst resting between applying coats of varnish that is.

8FD6EDA0-2FF8-458A-A855-9631EBFD9780.thumb.jpeg.1f7e33f636bc5e1f9a3aff2f1ff0df48.jpeg

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/5/2021 at 3:22 PM, Santana20AE said:

Only three years, the Mark IV was a totally different vehicle than the GT40.  

You missed my point, it was a total failure UNTIL Carrol Shelby fixed it.  After that, still had issues with it getting 24 hours.  But yes, 1966, 1968, 1969 were all wins for the Shelby modified GT40.  

And don’t ever mistake this one fact, the Mark IV was, is and will always, remain one of my ALL TIME FAVORITE racing vehicles.  Dan and AJ, making everyone look really bad.  Classic!   

(And yall can keep the GT40)   

The C8 had a really good run this year. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/5/2021 at 12:22 PM, Santana20AE said:

Only three years, the Mark IV was a totally different vehicle than the GT40.  

You missed my point, it was a total failure UNTIL Carrol Shelby fixed it.  After that, still had issues with it getting 24 hours.  But yes, 1966, 1968, 1969 were all wins for the Shelby modified GT40.  

And don’t ever mistake this one fact, the Mark IV was, is and will always, remain one of my ALL TIME FAVORITE racing vehicles.  Dan and AJ, making everyone look really bad.  Classic!   

(And yall can keep the GT40)   

It's not unusual for a race car to undergo quite a long development or gestation period.  I mean, its not like the Porsche 930 sprang from whole cloth.  It was preceded by a long line of cars.  The GT40 was a cut from whole cloth car.  That it didn't blow up on lap one was a huge accomplishment.  That with some effort, it was turned into a winning car as quickly as it was...made it famous!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Crash said:

It's not unusual for a race car to undergo quite a long development or gestation period.  I mean, its not like the Porsche 930 sprang from whole cloth.  It was preceded by a long line of cars.  The GT40 was a cut from whole cloth car.  That it didn't blow up on lap one was a huge accomplishment.  That with some effort, it was turned into a winning car as quickly as it was...made it famous!

The GT40 was developed from the Lola GT Mk6, IIRC.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

The GT40 was developed from the Lola GT Mk6, IIRC.

You do!

The 1963 Lola MK6 GT led to the Ford GT40
Brett Turnage, Mar 12, 2019
https://www.motortrend.com/features/1963-lola-mk6-gt-ford-gt40

001-1963-Lola-MK6-GT.jpg.d03cf03e51fbe80b0346891e89bc16b9.jpg

 

Quote

Their influence helped shape many racing series and also played a part in Ford's historic 1960s Le Mans victories. All of this was because of the enthusiasm of one man: Lola Cars founder Eric Broadley.

Broadley was a quiet man who trained to become an architect, however, his love for racing would take him on a different path. He started modifying pre-war Austin 7's, designing his own bodies and placing them on their chasses.
[...]
Broadley was a man obsessed with creating streamlined, lightweight aerodynamic designs.
[...]
In the new rules, Eric saw an opportunity to construct a sports car that was unlike any other at the time. It would have a sleek appearance, be low to the ground, and have a height of only 40 inches. It would use an unlikely configuration of an engine mounted behind the driver's compartment to allow for the perfect balance and the lowest possible center of gravity. The new car would be called the Lola Mark 6 GT, "6" because it was the sixth car designed by Lola, and "GT" after the new FIA GT rules that it was built to epitomize.

Lola_Mk6_GT_front.thumb.jpg.30b5f553187d021e67e197c5ae87ca79.jpg

Photo source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lola_Mk6

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

The GT40 was developed from the Lola GT Mk6, IIRC.

Maybe not developed from, in the sense of the Porsche 904 begat the 906 which begat the 910/901 which led to the mighty 917.  But most certainly it was heavily influenced by the Lola GT, as Eric Broadley, who designed the Lola was one of the lead project engineers on the GT40...

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/23/2021 at 10:23 PM, TwoLegged said:

We'll have to disagree on the long tail, but I too love tillers.

My objection to that cockpit is that like other cockpits of that era, its ergonomics are grim.   The tiller sweeps most of the cockpit, and the poor crew have to clamber over it to get winches outside the coamings.  That's the sailing equivalent of the QWERTY keyboard layout, which was designed to be as unusable as possible.

Well, maybe you need to use a different typewriter!

 

B5E5A430-14FF-47BA-AB55-4B4D1909EC39.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sail4beer said:

Well, maybe you need to use a different typewriter!

 

B5E5A430-14FF-47BA-AB55-4B4D1909EC39.jpeg

It's always a good joke to pull off the keys and move them around, too. Or quietly substitute a French or Polish keyboard for the standard American.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fun times can be had with an old school typewriter, however, this model is a Swiss army typewriter and it was produced that way. I couldn’t resist the temptation after TwoLegged brought it up! Took me a couple of weeks to get to see it again after I saw it at my brother’s house…

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Ishmael said:

It's always a good joke to pull off the keys and move them around, too. Or quietly substitute a French or Polish keyboard for the standard American.

First time I went to France, the small hotel we were staying in let me use their computer to print out my boarding passes for the next leg of our trip.  I couldn't figure out why I couldn't get to the website until I looked closely at the keyboard and figured out that they do things differently there.  It's like Steve Martin used to say:  "Those French have a different word for everything."

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bull City said:

Both this thread and "Mocking Ads on CraigsList" are going through a car phase right now.

Maybe because after 8 1/2 years we've found most of the cool boats, so need a good tread drift every now and again to give folks over in the "Cool Boats Research Department" more time to find the remaining cool boats?

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Crash said:

Maybe because after 8 1/2 years we've found most of the cool boats, so need a good tread drift every now and again to give folks over in the "Cool Boats Research Department" more time to find the remaining cool boats?

Hey, I'm not complaining, I just thought it was an interesting coincidence. Good explanation, though.

Link to post
Share on other sites

After drawing the hull, did they lose their French curve?  The house looks too boxy to  me.  An effort to blend curves and shapes would make a huge difference in the appearance of that boat.  My humble opinion.  

Link to post
Share on other sites