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I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

Does it come with a codpiece?  And I can easily singlehand or cruise with the wife and no crew. I say that a lot when I see an exotic, beautiful car, or a mansion that is just too f'n big

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As a young dinghy sailor, it was on the International 14 that I was the most euphoric while being simultaneously terrified. If I told you how many times I went from out on the trapeze to around the lee of the forestay after burying the bow in a wave, you wouldn't believe me. When I started working in the offshore, with regular 3-year visits for helicopter dunker training, it was a cakewalk after crewing on a 14.

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33 minutes ago, Jim in Halifax said:

When I started working in the offshore, with regular 3-year visits for helicopter dunker training, it was a cakewalk after crewing on a 14.

Details please. Thank you.

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1 minute ago, Bull City said:

Details please. Thank you.

After the Ocean Ranger disaster off Newfoundland in 1982, the authorities decreed that everyone working offshore must have Basic Survival Training. This involved basic marine firefighting, survival suit practice, sea day in a TEMPSC (Totally Enclosed Motor Propelled Survival Craft...i.e. lifeboat) and deploying and boarding liferafts in the water, and, for the piece de resistance. three successful dunker crashes. Similar to military helicopter egress training, or fighter ditching sled simulations, The dunker is fuselage section with seats, belts, emergency escape windows, all configurable to a variety of commercial offshore-rated helicopters. The dunker is deployed over a deep, unheated swimming pool (with rescue SCUBA divers standing by). It is designed to sink rapidly and invert while sinking, simulating a helicopter ditching at sea. A lot of bubbles, water up the nose, in the ears, and disorientation ensues. The trainees practice landmarking their exit, releasing the emergency exit, unbuckling, and swimming to the surface. Some people hated it, (I actually enjoyed it, along with the 'bonus' challenges like getting a liferaft or ELT out during the escape) some didn't mind, but everyone had to do it as a condition of work. I like to think that the BST course every 3 years made me a safer sailor, all paid for by the oil companies.

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2 hours ago, Jim in Halifax said:

After the Ocean Ranger disaster off Newfoundland in 1982, the authorities decreed that everyone working offshore must have Basic Survival Training. This involved basic marine firefighting, survival suit practice, sea day in a TEMPSC (Totally Enclosed Motor Propelled Survival Craft...i.e. lifeboat) and deploying and boarding liferafts in the water, and, for the piece de resistance. three successful dunker crashes. Similar to military helicopter egress training, or fighter ditching sled simulations, The dunker is fuselage section with seats, belts, emergency escape windows, all configurable to a variety of commercial offshore-rated helicopters. The dunker is deployed over a deep, unheated swimming pool (with rescue SCUBA divers standing by). It is designed to sink rapidly and invert while sinking, simulating a helicopter ditching at sea. A lot of bubbles, water up the nose, in the ears, and disorientation ensues. The trainees practice landmarking their exit, releasing the emergency exit, unbuckling, and swimming to the surface. Some people hated it, (I actually enjoyed it, along with the 'bonus' challenges like getting a liferaft or ELT out during the escape) some didn't mind, but everyone had to do it as a condition of work. I like to think that the BST course every 3 years made me a safer sailor, all paid for by the oil companies.

Shite! Glad I was a fat-arsed banker.

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Probably not much different than a lot of the stuff the military does. I was young, hardy, and a bit cocky. It was kinda fun. I pity the young guys and gals that got stuck-in to the oil patch in the last decade - dead end career move (although fossil fuel isn't going to disappear in my lifetime, or probably in my kids' either).

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I've always liked the lines of the Pearson Triton. Here's one on Reudi Reservoir near Basalt, Colorado. Rob, the owner hosted my family at the Aspen Yacht Club years ago. It was a very laid back setting with some really nice people.

 

 

f060729_098.jpg

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10 hours ago, Son of Hans said:

Another oldie: I know nothing about this boat except that I took the picture in Guadalupe in 1976.  I'm not usually a fan of prominent deck houses, but somehow this manages to look right.

Guad015a.gif

The bow screams S&S to me.  Maybe it's ALSUMAR?   The skylights on the deck seem different, but the deckhouse and general size seem about right.

1686599466_DesignNo.26_Image.thumb.jpg.f04df90a42c7be211fe91ef99f1b100a.jpg1519914256_DesignNo.26_ArrangementPlan.thumb.jpg.6fd0311af8205ccfabf7069832d79335.jpg696078023_AlsumarArticle.thumb.jpg.fd44211f984857102bbdca03850854bc.jpg

 

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45 minutes ago, MFH125 said:

The bow screams S&S to me.  Maybe it's ALSUMAR?   The skylights on the deck seem different, but the deckhouse and general size seem about right.

1686599466_DesignNo.26_Image.thumb.jpg.f04df90a42c7be211fe91ef99f1b100a.jpg1519914256_DesignNo.26_ArrangementPlan.thumb.jpg.6fd0311af8205ccfabf7069832d79335.jpg696078023_AlsumarArticle.thumb.jpg.fd44211f984857102bbdca03850854bc.jpg

 

Very similar, for sure, but the one in your 1976 photo is a ketch, and Alsumar a yawl. Of course, that could have been changed. I had a boat back in the 1970s that had had four completely different rigs over its 50-year lifetime.

It's interesting that the mizzen mast on the ketch does not appear to have spreaders.

Steering Alsumar under power will require a bit of attention, with that radically offset prop. I had one of those in a boat long ago. You didn't do a lot of extended motoring with it, but you knew how it was going to back down : poorly.

When I was in college. I used to devour those design pages in old issues of Yachting and Rudder. The descriptions were as mesmerizing as the drawings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On 11/9/2021 at 7:16 PM, us7070 said:

any more pics?

 

I don't, yet. Will try. Here's a review before it was built. It's basically cold moulded wood with an interesting composite of carbon fiber and foam. 

https://maineboats.com/print/issue-167/tripp-45-modern-wood-composite-daysailer

 

MIST in slings. Great looking boat! 

245213139_Mistinslings.thumb.jpg.7789a0aca869dd2432120e93c17b2518.jpg

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30 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

He did, but did Jr. steal dads legacy? Only time will tell that. 

184698392_B40foliagecropfinal.thumb.jpg.052fa75f4f1a82d84aedb445e0a4b6cf.jpg

His father had the advantage of working in an era when lots of boats were being built.  It's hard for any designer in North America to build a reputation on the small volumes of current production. 

Sure, a high proportion of new build yachts in North America seem to be high-end custom or semi-custom boats, which is where Tripp Jr is working.  But even so, it's small beer compared to the 1960s and 1970s.

It's different in Europe, were production volumes are much higher.  

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Another generational boat design/build history: RECLUTA. "Designed in 1944 by German Frers (Snr.) and built by his son over 70 years later."

Now all wrapped up in a new book by granddaughter/daughter, Zelmira Frers: 

Zelmira conceived the book as a movie, in chronological order:
„It tells three stories at the same time, the construction of Recluta, the growing passion of my father since childhood, and a continuous reflection of the passing of time and knowledge transmission. In the book, there are many characters talking and giving their ideas. In fact, what I like the most is that I created a big conversation between people of different ages and of different times.“

 

117588215_ScreenShot2021-11-14at8_48_41AM.thumb.png.3fe9f294b2cc8bcd40a1d5d5e86a125a.png

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On 11/13/2021 at 8:53 AM, Kris Cringle said:

I don't, yet. Will try. Here's a review before it was built. It's basically cold moulded wood with an interesting composite of carbon fiber and foam. 

https://maineboats.com/print/issue-167/tripp-45-modern-wood-composite-daysailer

 

MIST in slings. Great looking boat! 

245213139_Mistinslings.thumb.jpg.7789a0aca869dd2432120e93c17b2518.jpg

And sails nicely. The builder is doing seatrials on the new boat, these days. They often do this in the late fall getting all the kinks worked out of the new boat. Then they can put it away in working order. They have the bay to themselves. 

image.thumb.png.ceb9e0e016ed2448d9ecdeaa2f171575.png

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47 minutes ago, TwoLegged said:

Sure, a high proportion of new build yachts in North America seem to be high-end custom or semi-custom boats, which is where Tripp Jr is working.  But even so, it's small beer compared to the 1960s and 1970s.

It's different in Europe, were production volumes are much higher.  

I'm pretty sure that a high percentage of Tripp's boats are in Europe for European owners.., and if you calculated the percentage by the foot it would be even greater

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1 hour ago, us7070 said:

I'm pretty sure that a high percentage of Tripp's boats are in Europe for European owners.., and if you calculated the percentage by the foot it would be even greater

I haven't seen any evidence of that, tho tbf I haven't looked hard.

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3 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Another generational boat design/build history: RECLUTA. "Designed in 1944 by German Frers (Snr.) and built by his son over 70 years later."

Now all wrapped up in a new book by granddaughter/daughter, Zelmira Frers: 

Zelmira conceived the book as a movie, in chronological order:
„It tells three stories at the same time, the construction of Recluta, the growing passion of my father since childhood, and a continuous reflection of the passing of time and knowledge transmission. In the book, there are many characters talking and giving their ideas. In fact, what I like the most is that I created a big conversation between people of different ages and of different times.“

 

117588215_ScreenShot2021-11-14at8_48_41AM.thumb.png.3fe9f294b2cc8bcd40a1d5d5e86a125a.png

She sure looks like her dad.

Germán Frers - a talent for design

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On 11/11/2021 at 2:21 PM, Jim in Halifax said:

As a young dinghy sailor, it was on the International 14 that I was the most euphoric while being simultaneously terrified. If I told you how many times I went from out on the trapeze to around the lee of the forestay after burying the bow in a wave, you wouldn't believe me. When I started working in the offshore, with regular 3-year visits for helicopter dunker training, it was a cakewalk after crewing on a 14.

As a skinny 14 year old my first boat was a Kirby V, still competitive but the cool guys with wallets were buying Beikers. I talked one of my older brother’s buddies (college football player) to hang on the wire for me (single trap in the day) – it was exciting enough that a varsity Jock would be willing to spend time with a high school kid (that and the poolside talent at the yacht club had some appeal).

On light wind days I’d go solo helming from the wire, if I misjudged the wind or it came up while out there I was reminded of two things:

1.       What it must have felt like to be the stone leaving David’s sling...and

2.       I was not heavy enough to right the boat on my own ...

God I miss being so stupid and so alive in the moment.

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Hogged sheers just look wrong.

Even all that varnish can't make it right.

Agree. I've never felt comfortable with the look of reverse sheer boats. But my understanding is, in design terms, it helps to flatten out  their rocker and delivers long, flat aft runs (great for fast, planing hulls shapes). 

Possible exception might be AC75's. But even these contraptions tend to make IOR boats reasonably attractive. ;-)

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3 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Hogged sheers just look wrong.

Even all that varnish can't make it right.

Are we seeing a hogged sheer, or is it a raised deck above a traditional sheer? I think I see a 'knuckle', sort of, as a deck line. 

If I'm not seeing what I'm seeing, I want to patent the idea right now. 

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1 minute ago, Kris Cringle said:

Are we seeing a hogged sheer, or is it a raised deck above a traditional sheer? I think I see a 'knuckle', sort of, as a deck line. 

If I'm not seeing what I'm seeing, I want to patent the idea right now. 

Very hard to tell from the angle at which the picture is taken, but I think that the upper most strake isn't smooth with the rest of the hull, but leans inward leaving a distinct corner which forms a more traditional sheer.

I guess it's not for everyone, but personally, I find the boat pretty striking looking.

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

Are we seeing a hogged sheer, or is it a raised deck above a traditional sheer? I think I see a 'knuckle', sort of, as a deck line. 

If I'm not seeing what I'm seeing, I want to patent the idea right now. 

Johann Tanzer beat you to it.

1024px-Tanzer_26_Sun_Tanz_0416.jpg

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18 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Are we seeing a hogged sheer, or is it a raised deck above a traditional sheer? I think I see a 'knuckle', sort of, as a deck line. 

If I'm not seeing what I'm seeing, I want to patent the idea right now. 

A German designer known for this feature Is Reinke:

reinke-hydra-31909_1e.jpg

https://www.devalk.nl/en/yachtbrokerage/31909/REINKE-HYDRA.html

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4 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

The Stone Horse did it before the Cal20 , I think. 

1468163496_stonehorse.jpg.9c8abf48254a9e1e245f8f8762b147e7.jpg

Sailboatdata.com says the Stone Horse was first built in 1931.   A bit before the Cal 20.  But I wouldn't be surprised if the idea is even older than that.

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On 11/18/2021 at 6:59 PM, Matagi said:

2cf31d152568123f310a6ee8974739eb.jpg


Vänta-Litet, an A22 skerrycruiser from 1982.

@Matagi, do you have any more info on her?  Googling has got me nowhere, unfortunately.  Although, I did learn that Vänta-Litet means "wait a little" in Swedish, which is a pretty good boat name.

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4 hours ago, MFH125 said:

@Matagi, do you have any more info on her?  Googling has got me nowhere, unfortunately.  Although, I did learn that Vänta-Litet means "wait a little" in Swedish, which is a pretty good boat name.

Not much  sadly, it's S-359 in the register, here is more on all boats of the class.

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2 hours ago, Bull City said:

The Thunderbird does the reverse sheer kind of nicely. The feature is not something I would seek out.

Actually, it's probably a straight sheer.

image.png.3d835ff246c14817879c88a67b040331.png

 

image.png.719594c4d3837e6be51b8ba761d55437.png

The Thunderbird design is another one where the sheeerline is an absolutely straight line, not a reverse sheer. It is designed to be built of plywood sheets, which cannot be bent into compound shapes.

It looks reverse because it is narrower at bow and stern than in the middle. If you take that shape and rotate it in 3D, as in the photo, it will always look like a reverse sheer.

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On 11/18/2021 at 5:06 PM, Kris Cringle said:

If I'm not seeing what I'm seeing, I want to patent the idea right now. 

So we're seeing a straight sheer (which I agree with) as a reverse sheer. I'm with KC on this.

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2 hours ago, accnick said:

Looking at the profile drawings for this one, the hull sheerline is an absolutely straight line.

Not according to most sources, including Per Brohall. From Wiki:

Quote

The Vega is a recreational keelboat, built predominantly of fibreglass, with wood trim. It has a masthead sloop rig with aluminum spars, a deck-stepped mast, wire standing rigging and a single set of unswept spreaders. The hull has a slightly reverse sheer line, a spooned raked stem, an angled transom, a keel-mounted rudder controlled by a tiller and a fixed modified long keel, with a cutaway forefoot

 

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8 hours ago, Bull City said:

The Thunderbird does the reverse sheer kind of nicely. The feature is not something I would seek out.

Actually, it's probably a straight sheer.

image.png.3d835ff246c14817879c88a67b040331.png

 

image.png.719594c4d3837e6be51b8ba761d55437.png

I'm pretty sure the T-Bird has a dead flat sheer, not reversed.

It was designed for the plywood manufacturers association as a promotional thing so curves of any sort were minimized.

 

Edit: Accnick beat me to it.

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12 minutes ago, Voiled said:

Allow me to correct this with some "knuckled" raised sheer:

Flecke-Jouwer-onder-zeil.jpg

I guess that tumblehome in the upper strakes serves a real purpose for a boat with leeboards.  Gets that board nice and vertical while heeled over going upwind.

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20 minutes ago, Bull City said:

I think the straight sheer can initially look like a reverse, since the eye is used to seeing a forward(?) normal sheer.

A straight sheerline, in combination with any transverse deck camber, can look like a reverse sheer, depending on the deck structures. Even a subtle concave sheerline, in combination with transverse camber and fore-and-aft dome in the deck, will look like a reverse sheer from a lot of angles, particularly if the boat is flush decked or has small, narrow deck structures.

Whether this is attractive or ugly is a matter of personal taste.

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22 hours ago, slap said:

Sailboatdata.com says the Stone Horse was first built in 1931.   A bit before the Cal 20.  But I wouldn't be surprised if the idea is even older than that.

of course that's true - Shackleton's chippy did same to the Caird: "its solid construction does the carpenter credit, horrid old man that he is. Now he is raising the gunwale of the James Caird some 10in by the extraordinary expedient of fixing its existing gunwale the upper part of the gunwale of the now derelict motor boat. He certainly is a brilliant workman."

jamescaird_mcneish.jpg

they then took her on a famous jaunt in the southern ocean:

james-caird-slnsw.jpg

 

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3 minutes ago, Voiled said:

The modification to James Caird was done in 1916.

This example build in 1775 is still sailing today:Schermafdruk-2017-02-13-11.06.58-1.jpg

You can probably find older examples but i doubt there will be ones still actively used.

I wonder how much of that boat actually dates to 1775.

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We can go further back than 1775.  Here's VICTORY from 1758.  Those crazy Brits carried their raised deck so far they ended up with two extra levels!

MV5BMzQ4NTkxYjUtZGU2MC00YmQ1LTgzOTUtODlh

And the Greeks were doing it before that!macedonian-trireme-16.pngIn all seriousness, some ideas defy finding any beginning.

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On 11/20/2021 at 1:16 AM, Kris Cringle said:

The loneliest man in the world owns a 100' daysailer with a mosh pit in the middle, but he has no friends to take out. 

 

898507722_ScreenShot2021-11-19at7_10_45AM.thumb.png.3c9ebe902f1b07aa2c3185ef44a5016f.png

On the other hand, it could be the very definition of, 'splendid isolation'.

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On 11/20/2021 at 6:22 AM, Cruisin Loser said:

The Stone Horse did it before the Cal20 , I think. 

1468163496_stonehorse.jpg.9c8abf48254a9e1e245f8f8762b147e7.jpg

Actually, that is a very sweet looking cutter. Any idea what that cut away topsides quarter treatment is called, CL? 

There were one or two early turn of the century NZL designs a bit similar to that design.

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1 hour ago, Sailbydate said:

Actually, that is a very sweet looking cutter. Any idea what that cut away topsides quarter treatment is called, CL? 

There were one or two early turn of the century NZL designs a bit similar to that design.

I don't think there's a specific term for the cutaway quarter rails and they aren't inherent to a raised foredeck.  On SAMARI, another Sam Crocker design, they end just aft of the companionway bulkhead.

5312386387_92fd1cd2e4_b.jpg.f4a503d1e13c3a64657429168333e74f.jpg

SAMARI is a pretty early Crocker design, and in the later boats like the STONE HORSE, GULL, SPARHAWK or MACKINAW he carried the whale strake all the way aft to the transom.  On the STONE HORSE and GULL they form a sort of cockpit coaming.

555463_3759740227170_682860253_n.jpg.2b53df61716742a3bb23af89e99868cc.jpg

On MACKINAW they may be more like a bulkwark... it's hard to tell from the photos I've seen

M1-1536x1152.thumb.jpg.8983bf0a0da2ac271d39b2d91f7d3b79.jpg

I've done a lot of sailing on a STONE HORSE, and they're great boats. Interestingly, the STONE HORSE was designed with several different rigs and deck layouts, including a traditional shear and cabin trunk.  In my opinion, the raised foredeck version is both the best looking as well as the most practical.  Gives the boat a sort of buoyant look and adds a lot of elbow room down below.

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4 hours ago, Sailbydate said:

Actually, that is a very sweet looking cutter. Any idea what that cut away topsides quarter treatment is called, CL?

In Dutch it would be a "bakdekker" which roughly translates as "Forecastle Decked" but not necessarily indicates only the frontmost part of the boat has this treatment. The word is most mostly used for motorboats as a bakdek is more common with those.

Google image search result for: bakdekker zeiljacht.

One of the more famous Dutch examples is the "Takebora" a Baron G.W.W.C. van den Hoëvell design. It was used in an attempt to be the first Dutchman to sail around the world solo. It's skipper, Hans Maurenbrecher perished but the wreck was found in Australia.

 

A ketch rigged version of the boat Maurenbrecher sailed:

OB-design-03.jpg

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5 hours ago, Sailbydate said:

Actually, that is a very sweet looking cutter. Any idea what that cut away topsides quarter treatment is called, CL? 

There were one or two early turn of the century NZL designs a bit similar to that design.

The broken  or discontinuous sheeerline is generally referred to as a "raised deck", or in some case "raised foredeck." This is different from a "flush deck", where the sheerline is generally continuous, with relatively few on-deck structures, ie, no deckhouse or a small deckhouse.

These are not absolutes, of course: just general reference terms.

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14 hours ago, MFH125 said:

We can go further back than 1775.  Here's VICTORY from 1758.  Those crazy Brits carried their raised deck so far they ended up with two extra levels!

MV5BMzQ4NTkxYjUtZGU2MC00YmQ1LTgzOTUtODlh

And the Greeks were doing it before that!macedonian-trireme-16.pngIn all seriousness, some ideas defy finding any beginning.

Oh, there is definitely a beginning point for raised topsides. The very first guy who sat on a floating log said to himself, "Self, it would be darn nice if this log kept my butt higher above the water."

- DSK

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Some Jollenkreuzer-type boats have that. I once looked into the construction rules (very complicated!). I think they have a rule that determines maximum mast length in relation to deck height at the mast position, so you have an interest in raising the deck here. That's why you see a lot of boats with an inverse sheerline, some even with some sort of knuckle.

297.jpg

Arti_20er.jpg

 

 

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3 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Oh, there is definitely a beginning point for raised topsides. The very first guy who sat on a floating log said to himself, "Self, it would be darn nice if this log kept my butt higher above the water."

- DSK

https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/O8EAAOSw7p5ailzW/s-l400.jpg

"Grak have coamings. Grak! You fancy fancy boy."

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3 hours ago, Matagi said:

Some Jollenkreuzer-type boats have that. I once looked into the construction rules (very complicated!). I think they have a rule that determines maximum mast length in relation to deck height at the mast position, so you have an interest in raising the deck here. That's why you see a lot of boats with an inverse sheerline, some even with some sort of knuckle.

Hey @Matagi, what's imposes the construction rules?  Is Jollenkreuzer a racing class?

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4 hours ago, Matagi said:

Some Jollenkreuzer-type boats have that. I once looked into the construction rules (very complicated!). I think they have a rule that determines maximum mast length in relation to deck height at the mast position, so you have an interest in raising the deck here. That's why you see a lot of boats with an inverse sheerline, some even with some sort of knuckle.

297.jpg

Arti_20er.jpg

 

 

Those look like really nice boats. I wonder why we don't have anything like them in the US of A?

- DSK

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9 hours ago, Sailbydate said:

Actually, that is a very sweet looking cutter. Any idea what that cut away topsides quarter treatment is called, CL?

It's always just been called a "raised foredeck" IME.

If the aft portion wasn't cut down then it would just be a conventional sheer wouldn't it?

 

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1 hour ago, MFH125 said:

Hey @Matagi, what's imposes the construction rules?  Is Jollenkreuzer a racing class?

Jollenkreuzer means something dinghy-cruiser in German. The idea is that these are bigger unbalasted boats with some "interior". They usually are only balasted with a steel centerboard. Any boat built this way is called Jollenkreuzer in the german speaking regions.

There is however a very active (and very competitive) racing scene around some construction rules (most notably https://www.20er-jollenkreuzer.org/). Mostly in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. 

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5 hours ago, Voiled said:

The Regenboog Klasse (Rainbow Class) a design from 1917 is still actively raced in class events:

 

IMG_9762-e1556631927726.jpgrb110.jpg3644713_2_org.JPG?width=1600&height=1200

A little reminiscent of the, Uffa Fox Flying 15's maybe?

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6 hours ago, Voiled said:

In Dutch it would be a "bakdekker" which roughly translates as "Forecastle Decked" but not necessarily indicates only the frontmost part of the boat has this treatment. The word is most mostly used for motorboats as a bakdek is more common with those.

Google image search result for: bakdekker zeiljacht.

One of the more famous Dutch examples is the "Takebora" a Baron G.W.W.C. van den Hoëvell design. It was used in an attempt to be the first Dutchman to sail around the world solo. It's skipper, Hans Maurenbrecher perished but the wreck was found in Australia.

 

A ketch rigged version of the boat Maurenbrecher sailed:

OB-design-03.jpg

Pretty.

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2 hours ago, MFH125 said:

Hey @Matagi, what's imposes the construction rules?  Is Jollenkreuzer a racing class?

Yes, it's a construction class.

There are classes named 15 (or P), 16 (S), 20 (R), 25 (Blitz) and 30 (B). The number signifies the sail area in square metres, however, only the measured sail area. 

This basically only counts the foretriangle, so these boats all sport relatively small main sails and huuuuge genoas. P-boats and S-boats are sailed with crew of two, R-boats with three, these are also the most active classes. 

P and R-boats are the traditional classes with round hulls, S-boats are more modern and have chined hulls. In fact, P and R-boats could technicalls still have gaff sails, though this is non-existent in new competition boats.

 

Some other fun facts from the R class rules:

_Class surveyor is allowed to drill holes to examine thickness and material (so no forbidden sandwich...).

_aft deck must be closed, drain opening must not be larger than 250 square centimetres (all combined).

_among other very specific measures: floor width next to the centreboard must be not less than 25 centimetres.

_Inside, there are very specific rules regarding storage space and their openings.

_Materials can be: wood (traditional or cold-molded, the most common in new boats), GRP or ... steel.

And don't get me started on how they measure sails...

 

They can be very complex machines, very expensive, too. Here is a look at the cockpit of a 30 sqm. All control lines run hidden underneath. Often, they end in rollers that automatically furl in the excess so the cockpit is always clutter free. Zeese are wery German boats, ja?

christen-bootsbau-20er-jollenkreuzer-05.

All in all this is a very old class that has evolved over roughly 100 years now, so it's no wonder that these two boats are from the same class:

Ich_und_mein_Boot_Meusel-1024x670.jpg

134-1.pyc.jpg

and:

20erYachttest.jpg

Infoecke für Bauvorschriften - Deutsche Klassenvereinigung der 20qm  Jollenkreuzer e.V.

 

 

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Nothing stops my scrolling fingers faster than an old greyhound of the sea by Sparkman and Stephens. 

"Refanut is a Sparkman & Stephens design (#1104) built at Neglingevarvet outside Stockholm in 1955. She was commissioned as a fast off-shore racer with good upwind capabilities." 

690464238_ScreenShot2021-11-23at6_56_52AM.thumb.png.fffb434b4229e291d61a99ad43296918.png

 

 

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On 11/21/2021 at 12:51 PM, Steam Flyer said:

Those look like really nice boats. I wonder why we don't have anything like them in the US of A?

- DSK

Europe gets all the cool shit (motorcycles also!)

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9 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

"Refanut is a Sparkman & Stephens design (#1104) built at Neglingevarvet outside Stockholm in 1955. She was commissioned as a fast off-shore racer with good upwindunderwater capabilities." 

690464238_ScreenShot2021-11-23at6_56_52AM.thumb.png.fffb434b4229e291d61a99ad43296918.png

 

 

FIFY

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9 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Nothing stops my scrolling fingers faster than an old greyhound of the sea by Sparkman and Stephens. 

"Refanut is a Sparkman & Stephens design (#1104) built at Neglingevarvet outside Stockholm in 1955. She was commissioned as a fast off-shore racer with good upwind capabilities." 

690464238_ScreenShot2021-11-23at6_56_52AM.thumb.png.fffb434b4229e291d61a99ad43296918.png

 

 

One family ownership since built in 1955.  Now owned by the grandsons. That's some history for you!

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15 minutes ago, accnick said:

One family ownership since built in 1955.  Now owned by the grandsons. That's some history for you!

That seems to often be the case with some of these old beautiful boats.

Here's another cool boat, Solaris 50. I think it's a nice clean design of the newer genre of boats.

I chuckled because I used to get a much better shape with my 1961 roller furling spruce boom!

992943441_ScreenShot2021-11-22at4_48_12PM.thumb.png.7a604bbda3fd6ed8369ba7833e226f9e.png

 

 

 

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