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I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

Does it come with a codpiece?  And I can easily singlehand or cruise with the wife and no crew. I say that a lot when I see an exotic, beautiful car, or a mansion that is just too f'n big

Posted Images

At the docks on Thanksgiving day. Sangermani, Anselmi Beretti, Luglio,....not a local build. I recognize '67 vintage wood. 

1681887965_LOUISAbuildersplate.thumb.jpg.93919293c52d1b7b130d053b981eb11f.jpg

Wide decks, 50F warm sun, would make you want to go sailing were it not so still.  

1288495085_LOUISAdecks.thumb.jpg.592e38a7b6786a1ada4bbda1fd001cab.jpg

Someone took advantage of the off season in the shop to get a facelift. Can you get that shine on fiberglass? The painters must have placed the fenders. 

2138940713_LOUISAtopsides.thumb.jpg.823e41a487c81a3e682b9ba64bb31ab3.jpg

1967 Italian house details: Sleek. 

771852739_LOUISAhouse-2.thumb.jpg.37bc4b5eb1873acd70502896ac46cb46.jpg

Yawl, LOUISA is a long way from Luglio. 

262375797_LOUISAfar.thumb.jpg.45f210c841853aa3faea5e55a0990e05.jpg

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On 11/25/2021 at 7:30 AM, Whinging Pom said:

Bull, I thought this would be more your style.  It's machine washable too.:P

Gigi14.jpg 

Does it come with a codpiece? 

cod6.jpg.7da9c53fb2ac76ab01a93d920e102cfe.jpg

Just now, accnick said:

Nah, you've already got a really, really nice boat that looks just as classic, but almost certainly sails better.

And I can easily singlehand or cruise with the wife and no crew. I say that a lot when I see an exotic, beautiful car, or a mansion that is just too f'n big. Sometimes I wish I wanted things, but I just don't. I'm so happy with my entire life right now. We've had our granddaughter in town, she's an inspiration for politicians everywhere. THIS is how you get your foot in your mouth!

 

Lexi foot.jpg

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44 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

We've had our granddaughter in town, she's an inspiration for politicians everywhere. THIS is how you get your foot in your mouth!

 

Lexi foot.jpg

Lounging back on the couch with a little critter like that asleep on your chest is one of the best feelings you can experience.

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9 minutes ago, Bull City said:

^^ feng shui?

  1. (in Chinese thought) a system of laws considered to govern spatial arrangement and orientation in relation to the flow of energy (qi), and whose favorable or unfavorable effects are taken into account when siting and designing buildings.
     
    Imagining say blustery night on the gulf of Maine, I think not, Bull. But if I were a charterer with a good week forecast, I'd go for that design. 
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9 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Always popular with photographers, the venerable Peapod. Add a dash of Caribbean blue sprinkled on fresh cream buff, irresistible. 

Peapod.thumb.jpg.4206532624cae8a96954dc52ff211982.jpg

I love Peapods. I also quite like the paint scheme on this, appropriately named, dink. I think the colors just work together. It rows and tows beautifully.

654530213_BBYtransomjoke.thumb.jpg.6ac5e312144634dbbe0b66a2df792745.jpg

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9 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

When speed drives design, everything else goes along for the ride. 

1232000102_ScreenShot2021-11-25at8_26_35AM.thumb.png.be2dbd4352ec990af6d49097c372ca4a.png

 

Geeez, I dunno...

Bimbo pads on a sailboat?

I could probably afford one of those winches.

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This centerboard Yawl is overwintering at the same yard as me. Check out the pedestal helm. It looks like it belongs on a powerboat flybridge form the 40’s. Then there is the beautiful bronze main sheet winch/cleat combination. The rig is also unusual

 

Twinbro told me to check out the unusual cockpit so I immediately said “helm forward?” He said “You’ll see.” At least I was partially correct.

C6A5AF17-B288-4285-A430-ADA40E55C9FD.jpeg

8A3C6DE2-37B1-4235-89D6-E2E370E14323.jpeg

29AEA2D4-C9C3-4B55-83F7-BB3F9C2CF94F.jpeg

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I think the colors just work together. It rows and tows beautifully.

654530213_BBYtransomjoke.thumb.jpg.6ac5e312144634dbbe0b66a2df792745.jpg

That’s the one you leased for a regatta that required a tender IIRC. I wanted to paint my boat topsides that color. Very pretty. Went white with beige trim…but I might redo it now that I see that greenblue.

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7 hours ago, Matagi said:

Here's a neat little fella, currently up for sale, it seems:

462029-ba97437f14e55df9473f43638ae96b06-

price tag says 39.500.000 €. 

That sounds about right.

The bright topsides are really lovely. About a million years ago, I bought a surfboard, foam of course, that had been airbrushed to look like a glued up balsa blank. It was really extraordinary. That would be cool to do on a fiberglass boat, if it could resemble that ^^.

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A company did that back in the 80’s to look like old Chris Craft runabouts. They looked pretty realistic. Run by the son of an Ensign sailor who owned a high end furniture and clock making business. 

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20 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

A company did that back in the 80’s to look like old Chris Craft runabouts. They looked pretty realistic. Run by the son of an Ensign sailor who owned a high end furniture and clock making business. 

I've seen these "wrap" products, where they take a plastic film of some kind, and apply it to the topsides. I don't think it's meant to be permanent. You could make a roll of the stuff, say 3 feet wide in teak, run it along the sheer, trim it at the waterline, enter the WoodenBoat Show, win a prize, peel it off, and Bob's your uncle.

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10 hours ago, Bull City said:

That would be cool to do on a fiberglass boat, if it could resemble that ^^.

I know, but I guess you would always sail around with the feeling that 'something isn't quite right', wouldn't you? And I'm not sure if maintaining an expensive airbrushed wooden finish would really make that much of a difference in comparison to a wooden boat? It depends, I guess?

And also: does it really, really 'always' have to be 100% perfect?

dayattheraces002.jpg

'A Day at the Races' is one of the last RORC boats for the One Ton Cup, a Camper & Nicholson design, 35ft. I love that boat as it looks like an enlarged Twister. She featured in a very nice episode of 'My Classic Boat', in which the owner said that the hull was entirely planked in teak. The owner said, he has to repaint the hull only every five or six years or so, because it is so well-built and the seams never ever let anything through.

So she may look a bit 'seasoned' here and there, but I think it only adds character and shows some 'endurance' to the eye of a connaisseur.

Oh, and bonus points for that sweetheart of a dog.

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12 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

That’s the one you leased for a regatta that required a tender IIRC. I wanted to paint my boat topsides that color. Very pretty. Went white with beige trim…but I might redo it now that I see that greenblue.

   What are the 2 boats on he dock? The outer one”s cabin top reminds me of a Rhodes I know. 

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13 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

A company did that back in the 80’s to look like old Chris Craft runabouts. They looked pretty realistic. Run by the son of an Ensign sailor who owned a high end furniture and clock making business. 

Do you know this boat/owner? Sails on your bay. Nice photos, words on instagram. 

115066450_ScreenShot2021-11-28at7_47_51AM.thumb.png.4ca1d9660486caae617ca0a1130fc1ff.png

A nice simple boat with a woodburner below. 

1997099159_ScreenShot2021-11-27at3_36_31PM.thumb.png.5568da49332be2190ca5ae022deeff95.png

The beauty of a wood fire below in a small boat is not to survive a harsh winter (there are better heat sources for that).

It is for few memorable hours listening to the crackle of the fire, and just reading a book. 

1756408995_ScreenShot2021-11-28at7_47_16AM.thumb.png.91aab580c0fe1d7212d776e93d2429f0.png 

 

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I do know it. It was at Beaton’s Boat Yard had been holed pretty severely during Superstorm Sandy. I thought it was going to be destroyed like many boats were. Instead, the owners had the yard repair it. I spoke with them( older couple) during the repair and they were confident that the work was of excellent quality. I saw it out sailing a few times after. They sail the north end of the Bay and I sail the middle and lower Bay where there is more water.  I’ll have to take a ride up to the yard this week and see if it’s still there. I also want to inquire about a Lawley built S boat that was there during the same period. It wasn’t for sale and the S boat association states that only one Lawley survives. At this point they may be right. 

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1 hour ago, Maldwin said:

   What are the 2 boats on he dock? The outer one”s cabin top reminds me of a Rhodes I know. 

The inner boat is a Herreshoff.  I think it's a Newport 29.  They don't all have bowsprits, but ROGUE, has a short one like that.

Not sure about the outer one.  The photo is taken on the Castine Yacht Club float.  Maybe in the lead up to the Castine-Camden classic yacht race, @Cruisin Loser?

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16 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I love Peapods. I also quite like the paint scheme on this, appropriately named, dink. I think the colors just work together. It rows and tows beautifully.

654530213_BBYtransomjoke.thumb.jpg.6ac5e312144634dbbe0b66a2df792745.jpg

I'm a big fan of colorful paint schemes.  Yacht owners are, in my opinion, WAY too conservative about color choices: not every boat needs to be white or dark blue.

I've started collecting photos of interesting paint jobs:

CHICKADEE-Warner-Halcyon-Wooden-Sloop-Sailboat-good-boats-for-sale-1-1200x750.thumb.jpg.2f130baf96698648284fb9c0c0b0665a.jpg349_tomtownsend.thumb.jpg.e35b435381bf36a29bef9551db5e6a1a.jpg2011-09-06_08-50-08_786.thumb.jpg.8204b6f7cca701b80dd5b2bb01b6629a.jpgmaxresdefault.thumb.jpg.d878bd835944610e3b30b81384567ba0.jpg

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56 minutes ago, MFH125 said:

The inner boat is a Herreshoff.  I think it's a Newport 29.  They don't all have bowsprits, but ROGUE, has a short one like that.

Not sure about the outer one.  The photo is taken on the Castine Yacht Club float.  Maybe in the lead up to the Castine-Camden classic yacht race, @Cruisin Loser?

I think you're right about that. The outer boat is Thora, a Ted Hood design. 

Yes, this was the day before Castine-Camden. 

Is that Mermaid in the bottom pic?

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2 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

I do know it. It was at Beaton’s Boat Yard had been holed pretty severely during Superstorm Sandy. I thought it was going to be destroyed like many boats were. Instead, the owners had the yard repair it. I spoke with them( older couple) during the repair and they were confident that the work was of excellent quality. I saw it out sailing a few times after. They sail the north end of the Bay and I sail the middle and lower Bay where there is more water.  I’ll have to take a ride up to the yard this week and see if it’s still there. I also want to inquire about a Lawley built S boat that was there during the same period. It wasn’t for sale and the S boat association states that only one Lawley survives. At this point they may be right. 

To S-boat purists, the Lawley boats are the red-headed step-sister. I don't believe they have the Herreshoff molded sheer strake, but could be wrong. Somewhere I have a construction drawing for that one. I think they were called the 830 class.

My first "real" boat was a Herreshoff S-boat.

I also had a beautiful Lawley-built Q-boat, which had been converted from sloop to yawl for ocean racing (!) after it was out-built for class racing after two years. The construction details on that boat were spectacular: double-planked and copper riveted, with dovetailed corner joints in all the deck structures.

That boat had a five different rig configurations over its lifetime, stepped in at least three different locations. Ironically, they all involved only three different masts, which got shortened and lengthened multiple times over her 75 life. She was finally lost in LI Sound  during a fall race in a near gale in the late 1990s.

It was a sad but fitting end for a boat that loved to sail.

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Just now, accnick said:

To S-boat purists, the Lawley boats are the red-headed step-sister.

Makes sense that the only Lawley S that I sailed on was named Redhead. 

Musketeer (my favorite) is for sale but needs extensive work to undo a botched cockpit rebuild. 

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4 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Makes sense that the only Lawley S that I sailed on was named Redhead. 

Musketeer (my favorite) is for sale but needs extensive work to undo a botched cockpit rebuild. 

A few S-boats have been fortunate to get complete, proper re-builds. Senator Sheldon Whitehouse of RI co-owns one of those with Dyer Jones, former NYYC Commodore and AC race official.

I only owned an S-boat for a couple of years, at which point I got the "bigger boat" bug. Realistically, however, I learned to sail on the S-boat.

There are some wonderful lines in the S-boat description  in the Herrreshoff Manufacturing Company "catalog" (Yachts by Herreshoff) of about 1937:

"... The 'S' boats, while originally designed by Herreshoff for Class racing, are comfortable for short cruises. They are able enough to cruise along the New England Coast in summer weather, while the rig is so arranged with winches for both halyards that one man,  or woman, can handle it under any condition.... [italics mine]

"They are large displacement boats and very sturdy, but at the same time are more than moderately fast, and will give a good account of themselves in any weather."

Accommodations consist of two benches under a cuddy cabin, with room for a bucket.

The rig that one person can so easily handle has a self-tacking jib, but also has runners and checkstays, no fixed backstay, and a mainsail of about 350 square feet. 

Sailors were tougher in the 1930s.

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On 11/27/2021 at 4:46 AM, Kris Cringle said:

When speed drives design, everything else goes along for the ride. 

1232000102_ScreenShot2021-11-25at8_26_35AM.thumb.png.be2dbd4352ec990af6d49097c372ca4a.png

 

That is not a race boat. Just saying.

it was not designed to be fast, it was designed to look fast while being a great party barge. 

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49 minutes ago, accnick said:
1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Makes sense that the only Lawley S that I sailed on was named Redhead. 

Musketeer (my favorite) is for sale but needs extensive work to undo a botched cockpit rebuild. 

A few S-boats have been fortunate to get complete, proper re-builds. Senator Sheldon Whitehouse of RI co-owns one of those with Dyer Jones, former NYYC Commodore and AC race official.

I only owned an S-boat for a couple of years, at which point I got the "bigger boat" bug. Realistically, however, I learned to sail on the S-boat.

There are some wonderful lines in the S-boat description  in the Herrreshoff Manufacturing Company "catalog" (Yachts by Herreshoff) of about 1937:

"... The 'S' boats, while originally designed by Herreshoff for Class racing, are comfortable for short cruises. They are able enough to cruise along the New England Coast in summer weather, while the rig is so arranged with winches for both halyards that one man,  or woman, can handle it under any condition.... [italics mine]

"They are large displacement boats and very sturdy, but at the same time are more than moderately fast, and will give a good account of themselves in any weather."

Accommodations consist of two benches under a cuddy cabin, with room for a bucket.

The rig that one person can so easily handle has a self-tacking jib, but also has runners and checkstays, no fixed backstay, and a mainsail of about 350 square feet. 

Sailors were tougher in the 1930s.

Part of what makes S-boats unique and so rewarding is the fraternity surrounding them. I only sailed one with a friend a dozen or so times in afternoon races. I can't imagine cruising in one.  They are lots of fun to sail but it's a hard work kind of fun.

When I was in the Navy, visiting a Med port with a row of sailboats stern-tied to the quay, I spotted an S-boat. It was very distinctive and looked out of place but proud. I came back to it several times and was rewarded with meeting it's owner whom I recall mostly his earnest disclaimer of having sailed the boat across. Anyway he seemed to be keeping it in good shape and loved sailing it.

- DSK

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31 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

Part of what makes S-boats unique and so rewarding is the fraternity surrounding them. I only sailed one with a friend a dozen or so times in afternoon races. I can't imagine cruising in one.  They are lots of fun to sail but it's a hard work kind of fun.

When I was in the Navy, visiting a Med port with a row of sailboats stern-tied to the quay, I spotted an S-boat. It was very distinctive and looked out of place but proud. I came back to it several times and was rewarded with meeting it's owner whom I recall mostly his earnest disclaimer of having sailed the boat across. Anyway he seemed to be keeping it in good shape and loved sailing it.

- DSK

My girlfriend (later my first wife) and I had trouble finding racing crew, in part because we had lousy sails and didn't really know what we were doing yet when trying to race the S-boat. This was in the very early 1970s, when we were both just out of college.

So we sometimes cruised on the S-boat, from our mooring in Riverside in upper Narragansett Bay as far as Martha's Vineyard.

We had a cooler with ice and food, no stove and a bucket for a head, a 5-gallon jug of water, a couple of sleeping bags, a tarp to go over the boom at night, and a dinky anchor. Pretty sure we had a compass, and maybe a chart.

That was about it.

But we were very young, and in love with both our boat and each other. We didn't exactly know what we were doing, but we had fun, and learned as we went. Somehow, we survived.

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1 hour ago, Trevor B said:

That is not a race boat. Just saying.

it was not designed to be fast, it was designed to look fast while being a great party barge. 

True, it's a charter boat. But the broad aft wedge shape I think is driven by planing. I get that and in boat sizes below say 50' or so the 'space' looks a little more manageable. 2 wheels is a thing now, needed or not. 

MIST_.thumb.jpg.de9411fe0ad11a5365586213cdc15d23.jpg

When the boats get bigger, the wheels begin to part company. Maybe these big sleds don't lurch like old sailboats, ...but go over the waves like gliders, perhaps on a cushion of air, smoothing out the ride? 

Or maybe the person in the middle station is a spotter for the helmsmen during tacks, like in gymnastics? 

I like these Solarisyachts. 

429921625_ScreenShot2021-11-28at2_26_11PM.thumb.png.d55bb050a557e0b0d90abf163c0d7db8.png

 

 

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There are some really cool boats here.

Thank you all for this!

 

I have another one. But you have to look closely at the photography to recognize it.

It is a great looking tartan design on a classic 12mR.

In reality it is quite spectacular.

https://classicsailboats.org/alfred-mylne-12mr-jenetta-is-back/

Holger

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33 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

 

Some of these new boats are a photographers dream! 

No longer obscured by sunken cockpits, raised coamings, aft decks and stern pulpits, here our helmsman - feet planted wide, death grip on the wheel - and the power of nature are as one.

1494614132_ScreenShot2021-11-29at7_55_31AM.thumb.png.6b65838dae8fa0831464e6e37405957a.png 

 

Harnesses obviously not a issue on these aircraft carriers.

 

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2 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

 

Some of these new boats are a photographers dream! 

No longer obscured by sunken cockpits, raised coamings, aft decks and stern pulpits, here our helmsman - feet planted wide, death grip on the wheel - and the power of nature are as one.

1494614132_ScreenShot2021-11-29at7_55_31AM.thumb.png.6b65838dae8fa0831464e6e37405957a.png 

 

I would feel very exposed standing out there like that. Anyone who thinks those lifelines across the stern are always going to catch you when the flush deck is swept by a wave and you lose your grip on the wheel is kidding himself.

And has been pointed out, no harnesses in those conditions?

Nice photo, however.

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On 11/28/2021 at 8:04 AM, Kris Cringle said:

Do you know this boat/owner? Sails on your bay. Nice photos, words on instagram. 

115066450_ScreenShot2021-11-28at7_47_51AM.thumb.png.4ca1d9660486caae617ca0a1130fc1ff.png

A nice simple boat with a woodburner below. 

1997099159_ScreenShot2021-11-27at3_36_31PM.thumb.png.5568da49332be2190ca5ae022deeff95.png

The beauty of a wood fire below in a small boat is not to survive a harsh winter (there are better heat sources for that).

It is for few memorable hours listening to the crackle of the fire, and just reading a book. 

1756408995_ScreenShot2021-11-28at7_47_16AM.thumb.png.91aab580c0fe1d7212d776e93d2429f0.png 

 

Sjogin has a big following on the Woodenboat forums, enough that folks chipped in to get her lines taken and a design done by Paul Gartside.  There’s a few being built now. 
 

Cool boat with lots of character, but I prefer the Nielsen double enders. 

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On 11/27/2021 at 8:20 AM, Kris Cringle said:
  1. (in Chinese thought) a system of laws considered to govern spatial arrangement and orientation in relation to the flow of energy (qi), and whose favorable or unfavorable effects are taken into account when siting and designing buildings.
     
    Imagining say blustery night on the gulf of Maine, I think not, Bull. But if I were a charterer with a good week forecast, I'd go for that design. 

OT: You have to use a special carpenters ruler to make sure all your doorways and windows are favorable. It's called a 魯班尺 Lu Ban Chi - Luban's ruler, Lu Ban being patron god of carpenters/builders/contractors.  Possibly useful to people with offset companionways to help mitigate the impending doom. 

 

4361834_orig.jpg.4fc637e13948e12b6fe27afbad21a6a6.jpg

There are four measures on this ruler: 1) Taiwan System left by the Japanese Empire, 2) Ding Lan System for houses, 3) Wen Gong System for religious stuff and lastly Metric because you have to build stuff to code.

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10 minutes ago, Elegua said:

OT: You have to use a special carpenters ruler to make sure all your doorways and windows are favorable. It's called a 魯班尺 Lu Ban Chi - Luban's ruler, Lu Ban being patron god of carpenters/builders/contractors.  Possibly useful to people with offset companionways to help mitigate the impending doom. 

 

4361834_orig.jpg.4fc637e13948e12b6fe27afbad21a6a6.jpg

:o what if offset companionways ARE feng shui and we've been horribly, horribly wrong all these years??

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4 minutes ago, chester said:

:o what if offset companionways ARE feng shui and we've been horribly, horribly wrong all these years??

That's a good question. I've never seen one with an offset companionway. But then again, those were wrecks or re-creations of wrecks and so perhaps unlucky. 

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38 minutes ago, accnick said:

I would feel very exposed standing out there like that. Anyone who thinks those lifelines across the stern are always going to catch you when the flush deck is swept by a wave and you lose your grip on the wheel is kidding himself.

And has been pointed out, no harnesses in those conditions?

Nice photo, however.

Exposed and lonely not what I go sailing for.

 

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2 hours ago, Elegua said:

OT: You have to use a special carpenters ruler to make sure all your doorways and windows are favorable. It's called a 魯班尺 Lu Ban Chi - Luban's ruler, Lu Ban being patron god of carpenters/builders/contractors.  Possibly useful to people with offset companionways to help mitigate the impending doom. 

 

4361834_orig.jpg.4fc637e13948e12b6fe27afbad21a6a6.jpg

There are four measures on this ruler: 1) Taiwan System left by the Japanese Empire, 2) Ding Lan System for houses, 3) Wen Gong System for religious stuff and lastly Metric because you have to build stuff to code.

I was wondering where in the world 9 cm was equal to 3 inches.

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3 hours ago, chester said:

:o what if offset companionways ARE feng shui and we've been horribly, horribly wrong all these years??

IIRC Feng Shui demands that stairs not be in line with doors - kinda difficult on a boat. :D

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On 11/21/2021 at 9:16 PM, Matagi said:

You knew this was coming, didn't you. 

15697327_1194222340668039_15112548635266

Maluka, one of my all time favourite coolest boats.

 

My favourite shot of the 2014 Hobart. I think we furled and unfurled the genoa 20 times up the river.

32916_0_1_photo_SYHO14cb_20107.jpg

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On 11/29/2021 at 7:59 AM, Matagi said:

Saw this beauty earlier this summer, near Cuxhaven. DSC02897s.thumb.jpg.210c0bf13f08aa0b72565f1420edc0cb.jpg

Probably Freya, built by a local shipwright for himself, I think these are Gartside lines.

my father lived part of his childood/youth (~1945>>1949) in cuxhaven, where he and my uncles started messing around boats...

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On 11/29/2021 at 3:56 PM, SloopJonB said:

IIRC Feng Shui demands that stairs not be in line with doors - kinda difficult on a boat. :D

Back in the late 1900s I made a double front entry door for a giant house in West Van. They were built and installed according to the approved drawings.  A Feng Shui master (geomancer?) rejected them outright.  The active door was on the wrong side - something kind of alignment issue.  There was no "let's see if we can modify...." with the architect but "how fast can you make another pair?".  There was no need to talk about money - these doors had to go and new ones needed to take their place. 

The original set hangs on the wall in the stairwell at the shop.  Beautifully made, but burl maple and brass inlay weren't my thing then, and are still not my thing today. 

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On 11/30/2021 at 4:03 AM, Kris Cringle said:

 

I was called by a voice to move the stairs in my old house, that explains it. Sorting out the doors, was easy. 

1540567023_Olddoorshorizontal.jpg.4e8f2106fa2d8f6a39c67f17753002ff.jpg

um. aren't they supposed to hang vertically?

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13 minutes ago, slap said:
20 minutes ago, floater said:

um. aren't they supposed to hang vertically?

Just rotate the photo 90 degrees clockwise.   Then everything is ok.

Dammit, you made me spill my beer.

Could one of y'all help me move the ladder over by a window?

- DSK

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12 hours ago, Jim in Halifax said:

For some reason, that thing reminds me of the pocket battleship Graf Spee...kind of sinister...

640px-panzerschiff_admiral_graf_spee_in_

Somewhere on their website (setsail.com) I remember Dashew mentioning that the brushed aluminium, 'militaristic' look of their boats is a distinct benefit when cruising in more remote locations, discouraging 'unwanted attention'.

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4 hours ago, alphafb552 said:

Somewhere on their website (setsail.com) I remember Dashew mentioning that the brushed aluminium, 'militaristic' look of their boats is a distinct benefit when cruising in more remote locations, discouraging 'unwanted attention'.

That look didn't help Sir Peter Blake very much.

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23 hours ago, Jim in Halifax said:

For some reason, that thing reminds me of the pocket battleship Graf Spee...kind of sinister...

640px-panzerschiff_admiral_graf_spee_in_

What's with all those portholes?

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On 12/3/2021 at 12:57 PM, Sail4beer said:

Back in the old days they let sailors get some fresh air.

4 inches of belt armor and you go and punch a bunch of windows in it.:wacko: It's like those Tudor-era 'castles' with french doors opening on the terrace.

castle gardens - Picture of Thornbury Castle Hotel & Restaurant -  Tripadvisor

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58 minutes ago, Diarmuid said:

4 inches of belt armor and you go and punch a bunch of windows in it.:wacko: It's like those Tudor-era 'castles' with french doors opening on the terrace.

English "castles" evolved into ever-lighter defences, as the English and the Norman rulers evolved from fighting each other to travelling abroad, plundering and pillaging the globe.

Warships with windows probably have a similar utility.  Not much use for scrapping with the other imperialist bullies, but just the ticket for sailing up some river in Africa to shell some poor Africans whose only weapons were bows and arrows.

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I’ve seen some warship footage from WWI era where the ship rolls into port and unloads all its munitions into the unsuspecting city or village. Unspeakable tragedy with no chance of defense.

 

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5 hours ago, Diarmuid said:

4 inches of belt armor and you go and punch a bunch of windows in it.:wacko: It's like those Tudor-era 'castles' with french doors opening on the terrace.

castle gardens - Picture of Thornbury Castle Hotel & Restaurant -  Tripadvisor

Contrary to popular belief, armoured warships are not completely armoured. This would not be practical in terms of buoyancy or cost.

Warship protection was based on the ‘citadel’ concept.

Command and control, gunnery directors, armament, magazines and machinery are heavily protected.

Power generation, plotting rooms and working spaces for gun crews and ammunition handling were deep in the ship and as much as possible, kept within the citadel.

Portholes were as a means of illumination and ventilation in unarmoured, non-critical parts of the ship and could also be closed by means of a heavy protective scuttle.

Remember, universal air-conditioning of a warship is a modern innovation. Older warships designed in the years prior to WWII relied on ventilators and portholes.  Especially true for those that might see service in the tropics or Med.

USS Newport News, laid down in 1945 was the first fully air-conditioned surface warship.  She was also the last all gun heavy cruiser designed for the US Navy.

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5 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

English "castles" evolved into ever-lighter defences, as the English and the Norman rulers evolved from fighting each other to travelling abroad, plundering and pillaging the globe..

Well, that ... plus the 15th century advent of cannon meant any vertical stone wall or tower, however thick, was just a breach in waiting. As the Tudors understood and the Roundheads drove home. So you may as well build in some bow windows overlooking your roses and depend on the nearby Vauban earthworks + standing professional army to keep at bay anyone who wants your head on their gatepost. Rather like Citibank HQ having a walk-in lobby. Devolved social control. ;) "We don't need bars on the windows, silly. We own the people who own the police."

You might even say this mindset exists at nation-state scales. Many of the world's greatest cities -- innovators of trade, banking, industry, and talent exchange -- have forgone walls for a clear viewshed and easy access. Rome, Constantinople, Genoa, Venice, London, Paris, Amsterdam, New York, Singapore, Rio, San Francisco.... Not one of them geographically defensible. Most of them sacked more than once.

Still, perforating a cast iron fighting ship with rows of glass-filled holes strikes me as an insane plan. Tear Along Dotted Line.

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23 minutes ago, Diarmuid said:

Still, perforating a cast iron fighting ship with rows of glass-filled holes strikes me as an insane plan. Tear Along Dotted Line.

Not as much as you might think.  Armour-piercing, capped, ballistic capped (APCBC) is a type of armour-piercing shell configuration introduced in the 1930s to improve the armour-piercing capabilities of both naval and anti-tank guns. The configuration consists of a basic armor-piercing shell, normally an armour-piercing high explosive shell, fitted with an armour-piercing cap for improved armor-piercing properties and a ballistic cap for improved velocity and range.

One way to defeat APC rounds was to increase the thickness of armour. However, it became increasingly impractical to up-armour vehicles. One alternative was the use of spaced armour, which consists of a thin outer layer of armour sufficient to deform the armour-piercing cap and a main armour layer sufficient to resist the now "decapped" round.  The citidel concept included the idea of "spaced" armor.  The outer hull of a ship was lightly armored, with the intent being to be just enough armor to "decap" the incoming round.  As those spaces aren't normally manned during General Quarters, you weren't really putting anyone at risk.  

In the Battle of the River Plate, where the Graf Spee fought three British cruisers, no rounds went through portholes on either side, despite the huge number of rounds fired.  Graf Spee was damaged to such a great extent that she was scuttled by her crew, rather than be surrendered to and captured by the British.  Part of the reason for this was the battle was fought at long range, so all the fire was "plunging fire" which came arcing down to hit the topsides of the ships