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20 minutes ago, Maldwin said:

    I think someone accused me of hypocrisy. 

That is border line ad hominem., and probably valid based on your objecting to political content just prior to unleashing political commentary.

Say three Hail Marys and sin no more. :D

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Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Does it come with a codpiece?  And I can easily singlehand or cruise with the wife and no crew. I say that a lot when I see an exotic, beautiful car, or a mansion that is just too f'n big

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1 hour ago, Maldwin said:

    I think someone accused me of hypocrisy. 

    In any event, i wish I had followed my own advice, and not engaged in politics on a Sailing Forum. My only excuse is having a second espresso before going on deck to chamois. 

At least it wasn't a second martini.

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In a healthy society there'd be an Uncool Boat Tax, and a Cool Boat Tax Exemption. 

The tax would be permanent and with no limit. Stuff like the Starck abomination would pay for more spirited and correct designs down the pipeline. 

Now back to regular programming.

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16 hours ago, Voiled said:

Those Skutsjes are relatively light so they float high on their sides without taking in water. A tugboat is used to pull them right side up again:

 

 

P1010054.JPG

Thank you. They're really interesting boats, I remember being moored next to one and being amazed at some of the kit when I took a closer look.

 

Bit more than launching a couple of RIBs with the club laser fleet.

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3 hours ago, fufkin said:

In a healthy society there'd be an Uncool Boat Tax, and a Cool Boat Tax Exemption. 

The tax would be permanent and with no limit. Stuff like the Starck abomination would pay for more spirited and correct designs down the pipeline. 

Now back to regular programming.

I love this idea.  How about the Unncool Boat Tax is used pay a negative tax to Cool Boats?

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8 hours ago, Hukilau said:

Quickstep 22?

Its been a while since I saw that ad, but I believe it is a Quckstep 24. I have seen pictures of the 24 with both a traditional transom and the double ended transom pictured.  To my eye, the traditional transom seems a bit abrupt ruining the lines of the boat.  So, I prefer this version which seems to flow with the sheer.  

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13 hours ago, Maldwin said:Ralph Stanley Friendship Sloop. My next purchase will be another sailboat, which explains why I want to hear about sailboats. 

Not the Jarvis Newman Friendship Sloop schooner rigged by Stanley in NJ is it? Sharp looking boat either way.

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18 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

"What a cool picture. And what good models,...So bored."

I love the world (and sketchy computer translation). I'm not wild about this boat, though,...

1517724950_ScreenShot2021-12-23at3_36_00PM.thumb.png.4afe7838286cef9d475cf4c832733dfa.png

 

Simon appears to be a sailor, but Garfunkel. Yes Garfunkel looks bored.

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3 hours ago, Santanasailor said:

Its been a while since I saw that ad, but I believe it is a Quckstep 24. I have seen pictures of the 24 with both a traditional transom and the double ended transom pictured.  To my eye, the traditional transom seems a bit abrupt ruining the lines of the boat.  So, I prefer this version which seems to flow with the sheer.  

24.  Yup.  Thanks for the correction.  I had one on the dock across from me for a few years.   Looked like a nice boat.  About the only double-ender I actually liked.

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4 minutes ago, Hukilau said:

24.  Yup.  Thanks for the correction.  I had one on the dock across from me for a few years.   Looked like a nice boat.  About the only double-ender I actually liked.

So what do you think about a Rozinante? Be careful with your answer. :rolleyes:

image.thumb.png.515b2f0555880272389ad8939834b331.png

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2 hours ago, Voiled said:

The GWS Schouw, a cool little boat and probably the most affordable way to get into racing classics.

06-Wietske-van-Soest-1024x540.jpg

05c735cc-57d6-4c06-9ecd-0cc51850b3d4.jpg

Note the blunt bow, the word "scow" is derived from "schouw".

I guess a schouw is another double ender design...

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2 hours ago, Bull City said:

So what do you think about a Rozinante? Be careful with your answer. :rolleyes:

image.thumb.png.515b2f0555880272389ad8939834b331.png

There are so many things to love about a Rozinante... but there's other things I don't so much love.  Collectively, though, a photo such as this brings a wistful longing nonetheless.

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3 hours ago, Bull City said:

So what do you think about a Rozinante? Be careful with your answer. :rolleyes:

image.thumb.png.515b2f0555880272389ad8939834b331.png

   There was one in Dark Harbor for years, on a mooring near mine, and I was never that taken by her. However I don’t think I ever saw her under sail, and she looks much better to me now. In those days, there were 2 Aramintas in Rockport harbor which excited me more, possibly because i grew up on a boat with a clipper bow. Today, i might like QUIET TUNE the best of all the LFH boats in that size range. 

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4 hours ago, Bull City said:

So what do you think about a Rozinante? Be careful with your answer. :rolleyes:

image.thumb.png.515b2f0555880272389ad8939834b331.png

5th amendment.  Not about looks, but about your last sentence.  I have enough enemies in this world already.  I do like wooden boats.

Just this morning as I was lying in bed, I thought about my career working with people with developmental disabilities, both as an advocate and later as a teacher.  I had to be the most controversial individual in the entire state of Louisiana.  People either loved me or hated me.  Sadly, too many hated me that were in a higher pay grade.  

All that said, a student of mine transferred to a school where my best friend taught.  The school was located in another parish.  He asked the student if she knew me…..

She said yes, and he was my favorite teacher.  

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4 hours ago, Bull City said:

So what do you think about a Rozinante? Be careful with your answer. :rolleyes:

image.thumb.png.515b2f0555880272389ad8939834b331.png

Horror of horrors. :o I posted a photo of a boat that is not a Rozinante. Can you tell why?

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1 minute ago, Bull City said:

Bingo. It's Doug Hylan design based on the Rozinante, and got the mizzen out of the cockpit.

Any difference besides the rig, Bull?

Nat Benjamin did a Rozinante inspired yawl as well.  The design is called TERN, but I believe he's built several of them.  It's got 18" more beam and fuller ends, not to mention a gaff mainsail.  Not quite as elegant as the original, in my opinion, but probably has a lot more room in the cockpit and down below.

undersail.jpg

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I propose 3 sub-categories for “cool boats”:

1) cool boats for messing about in. See the entries immediately above.

2) cool boats for offshore work.

3) cool boats that are aesthetic marvels but utterly impractical due to size, cost, or extreme design.

Or, to get it down to 2 categories:

1) cool boats I could afford to operate.

2) cool boats if somebody else paid for the upkeep, crew, berth, steaks, scantily clad models, etc.

 

Not that the thread should be restricted to any one of the categories above—all are nice.

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12 hours ago, Bull City said:

Sorry, no idea.

I believe Doug H also added 6” to the beam.  I consider both the reworking of the mizzen and the additional beam to be very nice improvements and that it’s still a Rozinante in style, looks, character and performance.  There’s always someone who wants to pick a nit…. Doug did, and the boats are better for it.

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4 hours ago, Veeger said:

I believe Doug H also added 6” to the beam.  I consider both the reworking of the mizzen and the additional beam to be very nice improvements and that it’s still a Rozinante in style, looks, character and performance.  There’s always someone who wants to pick a nit…. Doug did, and the boats are better for it.

In the words of Bill Garden: “Every boat can be improved with hindsight.”

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4 hours ago, huey 2 said:

 

Lovin to get back on track with the cool boats. 

I'll see your Ovni 37 (but look up Lavranos 37 aluminum w hard dodger s/v Trance) and raise it. 

I'll raise it up to the Garcia 52.

 

 

 

 

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On 12/24/2021 at 11:20 AM, Bull City said:

So what do you think about a Rozinante? Be careful with your answer. :rolleyes:

image.thumb.png.515b2f0555880272389ad8939834b331.png

Never insult a man's wife or his boat.

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On 12/24/2021 at 1:54 AM, TwoLegged said:

I love this idea.  How about the Unncool Boat Tax is used pay a negative tax to Cool Boats?

Shhhh!  Do you want to start a panic run on cool boats?

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Something entirely different, to the point i'm not sure which thread to put it.  A Moon Boat from the Bay of Bengal. Apparently it's shaped like this to be able to be rocked over a sandbank in front of the beach they are launched from. Not sure how and or that would work so take it with a grain of salt.

2560px-Moon_boat_at_Teknaf_sea_beach_09.

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

Black deck house? Not too sure about that.

IMG_8222

I think it works quite well, especially with the black sails.

IMG_8046

 

IMG_8340

This is Yunikon, a 12 m daysailer built by Heinrichwerft in Switzerland, some years ago already.

It was designed by Juliane Hempel, one of the few female naval architects I know. Very, very nice portfolio that she has designed in the past, she also specializes in wooden masts for 12Metre yachts nowadays.

Yunikon is wood core (strip planked) 11.78 m long, weighs 3.5 tons and has an upwind SA of 91 sqm and a gennaker with 150 sqm. Very powerful for a daysailer, but: The owners had an Esse 850 before, so you know where she has her roots. 

Here are more pics, you can find more on the yards website

I very much enjoyed following the build process that was covered in a blog.

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12 minutes ago, Matagi said:

IMG_8222

I think it works quite well, especially with the black sails.

IMG_8046

 

IMG_8340

This is Yunikon, a 12 m daysailer built by Heinrichwerft in Switzerland, some years ago already.

It was designed by Juliane Hempel, one of the few female naval architects I know. Very, very nice portfolio that she has designed in the past, she also specializes in wooden masts for 12Metre yachts nowadays.

Yunikon is wood core (strip planked) 11.78 m long, weighs 3.5 tons and has an upwind SA of 91 sqm and a gennaker with 150 sqm. Very powerful for a daysailer, but: The owners had an Esse 850 before, so you know where she has her roots. 

Here are more pics, you can find more on the yards website

I very much enjoyed following the build process that was covered in a blog.

Very nice boat.  I’d love to go sailing on that.  But I’d be hard pressed to get the Admiral out for an afternoon daysail.  (Sigh)

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2 hours ago, Matagi said:

I think it works quite well, especially with the black sails.

Don't get me wrong. It looks cool, but I think it would get hot as Hades in the sun. In August around here, you could fry an egg on it.

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27 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Don't get me wrong. It looks cool, but I think it would get hot as Hades in the sun. In August around here, you could fry an egg on it.

I think he's in Sweden. They need all the heat they can get.

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55 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Cool wet boat.  

1965761970_ScreenShot2021-12-29at7_54_33AM.thumb.png.811aa477aa10e8866a2783fe75f5bb4a.png

A couple of guys in the stern just about washed away. Look at the wake coming off the guy's legs on the starboard quarter.

That's when you hope the lifelines and stanchions are really strong.

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2 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Cool wet boat.  

1965761970_ScreenShot2021-12-29at7_54_33AM.thumb.png.811aa477aa10e8866a2783fe75f5bb4a.png

Gotta love those open transoms. So east to take a dip.

(What are those white things on the centerline that look like storm trooper helmets?)

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53 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Gotta love those open transoms. So east to take a dip.

(What are those white things on the centerline that look like storm trooper helmets?)

Various types of satcom domes. I suspect the big one is used for video streaming and similar high-bandwidth functions.

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6 minutes ago, accnick said:

Various types of satcom domes. I suspect the big one is used for video streaming and similar high-bandwidth functions.

So the off-watch can lounge down below watching TV and eating popcorn?

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3 hours ago, Presuming Ed said:

Sweden? As Swedish as Inga here. In her lederhosen.

19A3BE92-D470-4B5C-83D5-6777D5A8488D.jpeg.c9017d387882d908996f3829b89a6bee.jpeg

Yeah, I had another look at the flag on the boat and it is not Swedish, but I was too lazy to look it up to see where it really was from.

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1 hour ago, Ishmael said:

Yeah, I had another look at the flag on the boat and it is not Swedish, but I was too lazy to look it up to see where it really was from.

If you're talking about the red flag with the smaller white cross in the middle that's Switzerland.

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29 minutes ago, accnick said:

If you're talking about the red flag with the smaller white cross in the middle that's Switzerland.

If symmetrical: Switzerland

Pantone 485 C or 485 U1200px-Flag_of_Switzerland.svg.png

Otherwise(as appears this case) Denmark

Pantone 186c

450px-Flag_of_Denmark.svg.png

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3 hours ago, Voiled said:

Wyvern II build in 1944-1945 on a yard in Antwerp, Belgium by designer/builder Bob Murdoch:

8c448838-876a-b0c0-f135-b8802ede34cb.jpg

 

9f1ba39b-a310-b515-3fda-136f4248998c.jpg

Before restauration in 2001:

caae0f74-201c-dc40-9d1a-d2041fe94364.jpg

 

She was quite successful in races like the Fastnet.

Nice.

That boat deserves to be a schooner.

How the hell did they manage to build a yacht in wartime Belgium?

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5 minutes ago, Voiled said:

Belgium had just been liberated when he started to build this boat. It was a real struggle to find materials though.

So you're saying it was plated in wrecked tank armour?

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20 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

So you're saying it was plated in wrecked tank armour?

kinda looks like it.

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42 minutes ago, Presuming Ed said:

Funky, but cool. The Russian submarine salvage ship Kommuna. Built 1912. AIUI, still in service. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_salvage_ship_Kommuna

474A58D1-6B96-4CE7-A440-46EAFDB5A860.jpeg.6d3fdf1272a933b81c4cc020ac0d2024.jpeg

110 year old Russian ship on active duty?

Ha! Practically brand new. The oldest US Navy vessel still in commission and on active duty is the heavy 44-gun frigate USS Constitution, launched 1797. Here is her crew photo from 2017.

 

Constitution crew.jpg

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1 hour ago, accnick said:

110 year old Russian ship on active duty?

Ha! Practically brand new. The oldest US Navy vessel still in commission and on active duty is the heavy 44-gun frigate USS Constitution, launched 1797. Here is her crew photo from 2017.

 

Constitution crew.jpg

Active duty has a very limited meaning for that one

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15 hours ago, Fleetwood said:

They have a lot of demand for salvaging submarines in Russia?

Mostly in Swedish waters.

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On 1/4/2022 at 12:37 AM, accnick said:

110 year old Russian ship on active duty?

Ha! Practically brand new. The oldest US Navy vessel still in commission and on active duty is the heavy 44-gun frigate USS Constitution, launched 1797. Here is her crew photo from 2017.

 

Constitution crew.jpg

I wonder if there is a single bit of original material in her, other than perhaps the ships bell. Having briefly worked on the HMS Victory, which isn't even active, I doubt it. But still a cool vessel. Just more a replica of a 1797 vessel by this stage. 

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On 1/3/2022 at 7:37 PM, accnick said:

110 year old Russian ship on active duty?

Ha! Practically brand new. The oldest US Navy vessel still in commission and on active duty is the heavy 44-gun frigate USS Constitution, launched 1797. Here is her crew photo from 2017.

 

Constitution crew.jpg

Not much rust-chipping going on

- DSK

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4 hours ago, Jackett said:

I wonder if there is a single bit of original material in her, other than perhaps the ships bell. Having briefly worked on the HMS Victory, which isn't even active, I doubt it. But still a cool vessel. Just more a replica of a 1797 vessel by this stage. 

You raise an interesting point, but if you replace every part of a ship a piece at a time over its 200+ year history, even the documentation records consider it the same ship. With a replica, you simply build new from scratch.

Ships of this type were in constant states of re-build almost from the day they were launched.

Consititution has undergone numerous rebuilds over her long history, but she is not a replica. The spirit of those who built her in 1797 is still there.

I've been on her a number of times over the years, and she is an amazing ship.

She was state of the art in her day: a very heavy 44-gun (rated) flush-deck (no quarterdeck) frigate displacing over 2,000 tons, with massive firepower for a frigate at both short range (20x32-pounder carronades) and long range (30x24-pounder long guns), plus two 24-pounder bow chasers.

For a country that was very young in 1797, with no pretensions (yet) to being a major naval force on the world stage, she was an impressive piece of naval equipment.

I've been on HMS Victory, too, and she is impressive because of sheer size and total firepower, not to mention her history. But except in a one-on-one encounter with a ship of the line, I'd take a smaller, more agile ship like Constitution. Constitution could sail away a ship like Victory, provided she could get out of range of the bigger ship's long guns.

Sorry for the ramble. Ships of this period are pretty fascinating. They were evolving quickly in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, with steam power and iron construction looming on the horizon just a few decades later.

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20 minutes ago, accnick said:

You raise an interesting point, but if you replace every part of a ship a piece at a time over its 200+ year history, even the documentation records consider it the same ship. With a replica, you simply build new from scratch.

Ships of this type were in constant states of re-build almost from the day they were launched.

Consititution has undergone numerous rebuilds over her long history, but she is not a replica. The spirit of those who built her in 1797 is still there.

I've been on her a number of times over the years, and she is an amazing ship.

She was state of the art in her day: a very heavy 44-gun (rated) flush-deck (no quarterdeck) frigate displacing over 2,000 tons, with massive firepower for a frigate at both short range (20x32-pounder carronades) and long range (30x24-pounder long guns), plus two 24-pounder bow chasers.

For a country that was very young in 1797, with no pretensions (yet) to being a major naval force on the world stage, she was an impressive piece of naval equipment.

I've been on HMS Victory, too, and she is impressive because of sheer size and total firepower, not to mention her history. But except in a one-on-one encounter with a ship of the line, I'd take a smaller, more agile ship like Constitution. Constitution could sail away a ship like Victory, provided she could get out of range of the bigger ship's long guns.

Sorry for the ramble. Ships of this period are pretty fascinating. They were evolving quickly in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, with steam power and iron construction looming on the horizon just a few decades later.

Every time I see a living live oak I think of those frigates. The live oak, procured at great cost and some lives, was a superior building material. 

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42 minutes ago, accnick said:

You raise an interesting point, but if you replace every part of a ship a piece at a time over its 200+ year history, even the documentation records consider it the same ship. With a replica, you simply build new from scratch.

Ships of this type were in constant states of re-build almost from the day they were launched.

Consititution has undergone numerous rebuilds over her long history, but she is not a replica. The spirit of those who built her in 1797 is still there.

I've been on her a number of times over the years, and she is an amazing ship.

She was state of the art in her day: a very heavy 44-gun (rated) flush-deck (no quarterdeck) frigate displacing over 2,000 tons, with massive firepower for a frigate at both short range (20x32-pounder carronades) and long range (30x24-pounder long guns), plus two 24-pounder bow chasers.

For a country that was very young in 1797, with no pretensions (yet) to being a major naval force on the world stage, she was an impressive piece of naval equipment.

I've been on HMS Victory, too, and she is impressive because of sheer size and total firepower, not to mention her history. But except in a one-on-one encounter with a ship of the line, I'd take a smaller, more agile ship like Constitution. Constitution could sail away a ship like Victory, provided she could get out of range of the bigger ship's long guns.

Sorry for the ramble. Ships of this period are pretty fascinating. They were evolving quickly in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, with steam power and iron construction looming on the horizon just a few decades later.

 

20 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Every time I see a living live oak I think of those frigates. The live oak, procured at great cost and some lives, was a superior building material. 

I recommend "Six Frigates" by Ian Toll. It is an excellent and highly readable account of our history around this time, the politics, the decision to build the frigates, and the building process.

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6 hours ago, Jackett said:

I wonder if there is a single bit of original material in her, other than perhaps the ships bell. Having briefly worked on the HMS Victory, which isn't even active, I doubt it. But still a cool vessel. Just more a replica of a 1797 vessel by this stage. 

The US Naval Institute website says, "Today, perhaps 15 percent of USS Constitution – including the keel – is original material from the 1790s..."

https://news.usni.org/2017/07/26/uss-constitution-leaves-drydock-following-two-years-of-repairs

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13 minutes ago, Bull City said:

I recommend "Six Frigates" by Ian Toll. It is an excellent and highly readable account of our history around this time, the politics, the decision to build the frigates, and the building process.

I've read most of his books. All very well done. Some maybe a bit too protective of Halsey.

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1 hour ago, Elegua said:

I've read most of his books. All very well done. Some maybe a bit too protective of Halsey.

Halsey was certainly complex - a bit like Patton.

"Six Frigates" was the first book of Toll's that I read, then the Pacific War trilogy. I don't think he has any other books out there.

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46 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Halsey was certainly complex - a bit like Patton.

"Six Frigates" was the first book of Toll's that I read, then the Pacific War trilogy. I don't think he has any other books out there.

I recall I may have liked James D. Hornfischer's trilogy better.  Interesting things I've read recently...

Atkins has started a very good series on the Revolutionary War. 

Lonely Vigil was an interesting recollection of the coast-watchers. 

Tower of Skulls by Richard Frank covers a part of the pre-war (for the West) in Asia.  A bit revisionist on CKS, but brings a bit more nuance and balance to a history that has been largely ignored or overwhelmed by the CCP. 

If you really want to get into the weeds, and perhaps become a Fletcher revisionist, read First Team. by John Lundstrom.  Very well researched and blows up a lot of myths about the early part of the War in the Pacific.  

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Not a cool boat exactly, but related.  The talk of HMS Victory reminds me of my time as an undergraduate at U of T (Toronto), when I was scouring the Engineering Library stacks for books on naval architecture.  I found a musty old tome and pulled it down.  It was the British Admiralty's Instructions to Captains, printed somewhere around 1804.  I remember thinking, OMG, this could have been in Nelson's cabin on the Victory!  Not that copy of course, but I'll bet he had one.  I spent a couple of hours sitting on the floor reading about things like avoiding chafe.  Ultimately, it wasn't all that interesting, but a cool connection to our past.

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

Halsey was certainly complex - a bit like Patton.

He was the Naval versi