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Patton was sent into North Africa to relieve Fredendall, the previous commander who had fucked up.

Even the Germans regarded him as the best allied field commander.

Dying in that car accident was sure a good career move though - he had nowhere to go but down by then. :ph34r:

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Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Does it come with a codpiece?  And I can easily singlehand or cruise with the wife and no crew. I say that a lot when I see an exotic, beautiful car, or a mansion that is just too f'n big

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Fredendall is a serious contender for worst US general in WW2, but he does have some competition. 

Patton at least had reasonable taste in boats....

131427232_10157310363992237_193586841559 

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1 hour ago, Elegua said:

Fredendall is a serious contender for worst US general in WW2, but he does have some competition. 

Patton at least had reasonable taste in boats....

131427232_10157310363992237_193586841559 

That was the most aptly-named Alden schooner I know. Friend of mine from university skippered her when the Landmark School used her as a school ship in the 1970s.

I believe she is in the charter trade now.

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It's easy to have good taste in boats when you are born into money.

Well named indeed - IIRC he never sailed it.

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6 hours ago, kinardly said:

Read "An Army at Dawn", the first of Rick Atkinson's very well reviewed Liberation Trilogy, and then tell me if you still think Patton's f/ups were only political. He ignored orders and got his ass handed to him in North Africa. Basically, the Brits bailed out the US Army by advancing cautiously but steadily to threaten Rommel's rear from the El Alamein foothold until until he had to retreat to a stronghold in Tobruk. During that time the US Army had to absorb some bitter lessons about fighting an experienced adversary with poorly trained troops and second class equipment. Patton's record and actions were less than stellar. To me, having read quite a bit about the Union Army's incompetent leadership during the American Civil War campaigns in Virginia from 1861-1863, it was like deja vu all over again.

I've read it. Perhaps unintentionally you make the case. The US Army took pressure off the Brits. Yes, inexperienced, poorly trained and ill-equipped. But the Allied effort, England, was in extremis, and we kept the Germans occupied. Not terribly different from our performance in WWI. That is the price of delayed entry. We threw men and material at the Germans. Not pretty, but effective.

 

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Patton was also known for his love of the South Carolina dish, Country Captain: chicken simmered in tomato, onion, bell pepper and curry, served over rice, garnished with raisins, almond slivers, and crumbled bacon.

Similar to the favorite of another famous general, Chicken Marengo, devised by Napoleon's cook after the battle of the same name: chicken simmered with mushrooms, onion and tomato, served over noodles. You will think you were there.

Full recipes available on request.

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7 hours ago, kinardly said:

Read "An Army at Dawn", the first of Rick Atkinson's very well reviewed Liberation Trilogy, and then tell me if you still think Patton's f/ups were only political. He ignored orders and got his ass handed to him in North Africa. Basically, the Brits bailed out the US Army by advancing cautiously but steadily to threaten Rommel's rear from the El Alamein foothold until until he had to retreat to a stronghold in Tobruk. During that time the US Army had to absorb some bitter lessons about fighting an experienced adversary with poorly trained troops and second class equipment. Patton's record and actions were less than stellar. To me, having read quite a bit about the Union Army's incompetent leadership during the American Civil War campaigns in Virginia from 1861-1863, it was like deja vu all over again.

I’ve read the book as well…another awesome “first” book.  Patton didn’t have much of an Army to work with…so while he did get “it” handed to him by the Germans more than once, short of not fighting, I’m not sure there could have been any other outcome.  The Army needed to learn how to fight, needed to learn its weaknesses (both tactics and equipment). The only way to learn those lesson was to fight.  Patton keep engaging the Germans, even when losing.  It’s how the Army learned.  Rarely did Patton make the same mistake twice.  That’s why the Germans respected him so much as a combat commander.  

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5 hours ago, accnick said:

That was the most aptly-named Alden schooner I know. Friend of mine from university skippered her when the Landmark School used her as a school ship in the 1970s.

I believe she is in the charter trade now.

Sure is.  Growing up I used to always look at her when she was at the dock at Crockers or Manchester Marine in the winter   Sad day when she got blown onto the rocks I think during Gloria, but it may have just been a nor’easter around the same time… I can’t remember.    

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Bull City said:

Patton was also known for his love of the South Carolina dish, Country Captain: chicken simmered in tomato, onion, bell pepper and curry, served over rice, garnished with raisins, almond slivers, and crumbled bacon.

Similar to the favorite of another famous general, Chicken Marengo, devised by Napoleon's cook after the battle of the same name: chicken simmered with mushrooms, onion and tomato, served over noodles. You will think you were there.

Full recipes available on request.

Bring 'm on!  They both sound good

 

 

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On 1/5/2022 at 10:04 AM, accnick said:

I spent the better part of three months laid up in bed with back problems back in the late 1980s. During that time, I read Samuel Eliot Morison's 15-volume History of US Naval Operations during WW2 while lying on my back. There are several volumes of that I would read again, given the time.

The good thing is that if you have a specific interest, such as the war in the Pacific from Guadalcanal to Okinawa, you can be selective in the parts you read.

My late father-in-law fought that part of WW2 as a Marine aviator. Unfortunately, he was a man of few words, so I had to learn things second-hand.

Morison was a crusty old dude.  He hated my poetry.

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6 hours ago, Amati said:

Morison was a crusty old dude.  He hated my poetry.

We had the Rhodes ketch Mary Otis in our boatyard in about 1975. This was the boat used by the Harvard Columbus expedition of 1939, led by Morison, which re-traced the early voyages of discovery of Columbus.

It was a unique boat, but rotten as a pear by the time the yard had it.

The yard was doing some rebuilding of the boat, and tried to get in touch with Morison for some background. This was shortly before he died, and Morison basically came back and said "I'm old, and I don't think about those things anymore."

Mary Otis was unique for a Rhodes design, in that she was not very yacht-like, having been built for exploring. She was about 45' on deck, and largely flush-deck, but with an open-back doghouse just forward of the cockpit. Midships. In what would normally be the prime belowdecks living space, she had a big engine room with massive fuel tanks and a larger than normal engine.

What intrigued me was the shelter at the forward end of the cockpit. It had a large mahogany chart table in it, and the  chart table was covered with tiny holes from pins used to hold charts in places, as well as pricks from endless pairs of dividers. 

That chart table was pure magic, when you thought about the charts that had been spread out on it.

The boat was lost a few years later on an offshore voyage, which was probably a fitting end.

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On 1/5/2022 at 10:04 AM, accnick said:

I spent the better part of three months laid up in bed with back problems back in the late 1980s. During that time, I read Samuel Eliot Morison's 15-volume History of US Naval Operations during WW2 while lying on my back. There are several volumes of that I would read again, given the time.

Good friend of mine’s father is (was) the preeminent military historian in the US, which I never knew/appreciated until I was older.  He wrote volumes and volumes and volumes on everything.

I don’t have a particular interest in military history, but knowing that he was a strategic genius and author of so many books makes me the same way...I.e., if I had time, I’d read some of them...but if I had the time to read the history of warfare I might read something else instead.  Like that copy of War and Peace brought aboard while crewing Victoria, BC-San Francisco in 1991, and that I later carried with me to Japan with high hopes of finishing it there :-) :-). Still have it, but now it’s on my own boat...it’ll happen...

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Cool boat: ORC 50 carbon cat.

https://www.katamarans.com/marsaudon-composites-ts5/

Ignoring the price, it does have a few “cons” (there’s a list of nice “pros” too in the link):

Cons

  • These are technical boats to sail and will only suit experienced sailors.
  • Even the non sailors onboard are likely to feel intimidated by the power and speed of this yacht.
  • The interiors of these boats are pretty spartan – it´s all about weight saving inside. She has her charm, but don´t expect to feel cosy.
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19 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Cool boat: ORC 50 carbon cat.

https://www.katamarans.com/marsaudon-composites-ts5/

Ignoring the price, it does have a few “cons” (there’s a list of nice “pros” too in the link):

Cons

  • These are technical boats to sail and will only suit experienced sailors.
  • Even the non sailors onboard are likely to feel intimidated by the power and speed of this yacht.
  • The interiors of these boats are pretty spartan – it´s all about weight saving inside. She has her charm, but don´t expect to feel cosy.

That's a refreshing change from the typical advertising blather.

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33 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Cool boat: ORC 50 carbon cat.

https://www.katamarans.com/marsaudon-composites-ts5/

Ignoring the price, it does have a few “cons” (there’s a list of nice “pros” too in the link):

Cons

  • These are technical boats to sail and will only suit experienced sailors.
  • Even the non sailors onboard are likely to feel intimidated by the power and speed of this yacht.
  • The interiors of these boats are pretty spartan – it´s all about weight saving inside. She has her charm, but don´t expect to feel cosy.

That is a cool boat. 

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12 minutes ago, Elegua said:

That is a cool boat. 

Lots of pics and tech specs here,’at manufacturer:  https://www.marsaudon-composites.com/en/models/orc50-ts5/-9/

Someone I sorta know just got one.  (I’m, like, how the hell do you afford this...but the pandemic has been very good to a very small number of people...)

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8 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Lots of pics and tech specs here,’at manufacturer:  https://www.marsaudon-composites.com/en/models/orc50-ts5/-9/

Someone I sorta know just got one.  (I’m, like, how the hell do you afford this...but the pandemic has been very good to a very small number of people...)

Well, if you can't afford the 50 footer they do have a 42 footer for the peasant class.

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13 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Lots of pics and tech specs here,’at manufacturer:  https://www.marsaudon-composites.com/en/models/orc50-ts5/-9/

Someone I sorta know just got one.  (I’m, like, how the hell do you afford this...but the pandemic has been very good to a very small number of people...)

You're talking to the wrong guy. I drive the cheepest car in the company and drive it like a badge of honor. 

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27 minutes ago, slap said:

Well, if you can't afford the 50 footer they do have a 42 footer for the peasant class.

That’s absurd.  Following that well-known and long-established engineering and financial law —namely, the GBOGH Maxim— I’d go with their 57 foot offering.  As the ad copy explicitly states, the 57 “guarentee[s] [sic] pleasurable long cruises and efficient sailing!”

https://www.marsaudon-composites.com/en/models/orc57/

The problem is, with the big one, you’d get to your destination so fast, you’d never have time to enjoy the trip :-) :-)

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8 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Cool boat: ORC 50 carbon cat.

https://www.katamarans.com/marsaudon-composites-ts5/

Ignoring the price, it does have a few “cons” (there’s a list of nice “pros” too in the link):

Cons

  • These are technical boats to sail and will only suit experienced sailors.
  • Even the non sailors onboard are likely to feel intimidated by the power and speed of this yacht.
  • The interiors of these boats are pretty spartan – it´s all about weight saving inside. She has her charm, but don´t expect to feel cosy.

Yeah, they are awesome, but definitely a serious performance boat even if it's marketed as a cruiser/racer.

 

 

 

 

Some nice shots of cruising in the Caribbean there on the smaller 42.

Regarding the 2019 ARC result, certainly it was a great achivement. On the other hand, Régis Guillemot, while he might be in his 60s, is a well known French sailor who has sailed in numerous offshore races (winner of the Route du Rhum 2002 in his category) as well as being the the cousin of another great sailor, Marc Guillemot (3rd in the Vendée Globe 2008).

So not the average mom and pop cruiser... Even his wife says “For him, there is full speed ahead, or nothing!” So his average 'cruising' speeds on passage might not be comparable to most mere mortals.

And to give some indication that these boats can still bite, the same TS5 capsized after hitting a UFO at speed in 2020 on their way to the Canaries to join the ARC again - with the loss and death of one of the crew... :(

 

 

For people that can handle the performance the biggest disadvantage when cruising is that these light cats really feel every ripple when anchored in a bay somewhere which is quite a reduction in comfort for live aboards.

But time on passage will be definitely be reduced! :)

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I suspect catamarans are a lot of fun, offer some unique advantages and in the hands of skilled sailors are able to do some amazing voyages.  

For my thoughts, when the water is cool or the distance to shore is long and a committee boat is not available for rescue, I want to sail something that has a really good chance of self righting.  

That’s why our MC Scow stays on the trailer when the water cools on Caney Creek Lake.  (Exception, the rare race when there is a committee boat close by) 

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This 53 foot Amel Super Maramu Named SV Delos is a nice story,
He sails to New Zealand, met his wife, takes her on board.
Sails 3 times around the world, and have a baby together.
A modern fairytale.

879096432_Livingsailboat.png.6c49d6b5144b203e66d36274ae4ca9db.png


https://svdelos.com/sailing-travel-blog/amel-super-maramu-2000-sailing-sv-delos/

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2 minutes ago, Voiled said:

She looks like a futuristic galleon and that's awesome. The only thing wrong with it is she's undercanvassed but hey, those galleons were no speed machines either.

sailingyachta-1.jpg

 

You're either insane or an oligarch.

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5 minutes ago, Voiled said:

She looks like a futuristic galleon and that's awesome. The only thing wrong with it is she's undercanvassed but hey, those galleons were no speed machines either.

sailingyachta-1.jpg

 

Without the „rig“ she looks like a suppository. 

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    Unlike motor yacht A, which has slightly grown on me, Sailing yacht A looks just as bad as the first time I saw her. I am open to hearing from someone who understands naval architecture better than I do why I am wrong. 

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1 minute ago, Maldwin said:

    Unlike motor yacht A, which has slightly grown on me, Sailing yacht A looks just as bad as the first ice i saw her. I am open to hearing from someone who understands naval architecture better than I do why I am wrong. 

I am definitely not a naval architect but if you have so much money to burn, you might as well build a skinnier, longer and lower version that will sail @ 20 knots effortlessly in comfort while carrying as much tat on board.

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55 minutes ago, Maldwin said:

Unlike motor yacht A, which has slightly grown on me, Sailing yacht A looks just as bad as the first time I saw her.

Admittedly the design had to grow on me and i did not like it at first. The design choices started to make sense when i became aware of the tumblehome visible in the picture below and the galleon quarter fell.

I hope we get to see some helicopter view heavy weather sailing footage with the rig up some day.

Nobiskrug_SY_A_201906__4_.jpg

 

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5 hours ago, Voiled said:

She looks like a futuristic galleon and that's awesome. The only thing wrong with it is she's undercanvassed but hey, those galleons were no speed machines either.

sailingyachta-1.jpg

 

it appears her freeboard might catch a bit of wind on a beam reach.  That said, her hull design might actually generate a bit of lift when close hauled.  

Hope they have good generators available to run the elevators.  

Wonder what the draft is?  My thought, whatever they are thinking, double it, no triple it and have a really big bulb on the tip.  That’s a lot of freeboard.  

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7 hours ago, Voiled said:

I'm just willing to think out of the box.

You should be stuffed back in that box - and the lid nailed shut.

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I love this yacht.  My tastes have changed and do favor more modern designs, but, this just grabs my attention immediately.  A work of art in my opinion.  Probably sails like a witch too.  Windwalker is a Lyman Morse 60.

May be an image of body of water and nature

 

 

I believe I've actually toured this boat at the Newport Boat show years ago.  Maybe I imagined it.

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16 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

I love this yacht.  My tastes have changed and do favor more modern designs, but, this just grabs my attention immediately.  A work of art in my opinion.  Probably sails like a witch too.  Windwalker is a Lyman Morse 60.

May be an image of body of water and nature

 

 

I believe I've actually toured this boat at the Newport Boat show years ago.  Maybe I imagined it.

I've seen her at the LM docks. I believe she has at least one circumnavigation under her belt. Not just a yacht club queen 

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7 hours ago, Voiled said:

I hope we get to see some helicopter view heavy weather sailing footage with the rig up some day.

That is likely never going to happen.

That might chip a chandelier and jam the elevators...

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12 hours ago, Schakel said:

This 53 foot Amel Super Maramu Named SV Delos is a nice story,
He sails to New Zealand, met his wife, takes her on board.
Sails 3 times around the world, and have a baby together.
A modern fairytale.

879096432_Livingsailboat.png.6c49d6b5144b203e66d36274ae4ca9db.png


https://svdelos.com/sailing-travel-blog/amel-super-maramu-2000-sailing-sv-delos/

Actually, if it were a fairytale, there would be no crying baby on board.  Who wants that?

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12 minutes ago, Liquid said:

That is likely never going to happen.

That might chip a chandelier and jam the elevators...

It has some cool design features (like a hidden under the water line anchor, which has fallen off in a seastate at least once and the 'windows'), but it is a flat bottom power boat with some sails on it.

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1 hour ago, MauiPunter said:

I love this yacht.  My tastes have changed and do favor more modern designs, but, this just grabs my attention immediately.  A work of art in my opinion.  Probably sails like a witch too.  Windwalker is a Lyman Morse 60.

May be an image of body of water and nature

 

 

I believe I've actually toured this boat at the Newport Boat show years ago.  Maybe I imagined it.

Either way it was just a dream. :D

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Let’s see, I have my choice 

This 

image.jpeg.4a88d7b699bdb640b727d701685addcc.jpeg

Or this

image.thumb.jpeg.695f56579b3de32dcee61429565ba810.jpeg

Do I want a traditional yacht that actually sails wonderfully….. or some sort of nautical abomination that has some sticks sticking up that might actually catch a bit of wind if used, but no one in their right mind would ever try because it might spill water out of the swimming pool and sink the entire mess thereby causing an obstruction in the channel (because no one also in their right mind would ever take this “thing” out of sight of land.)

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10 hours ago, Santanasailor said:

it appears her freeboard might catch a bit of wind on a beam reach.  That said, her hull design might actually generate a bit of lift when close hauled.  

Hope they have good generators available to run the elevators.  

Wonder what the draft is?  My thought, whatever they are thinking, double it, no triple it and have a really big bulb on the tip.  That’s a lot of freeboard.  

She is a motorsailer first, but she draws about 8m and apparently has an observation pod moulded into the keel structure somewhere with big, foot-thick glass windows. A cool feature on a yacht that is otherwise abosolutely hideous and impractical. Her masts also had to be curved agressively and project well forward of their bases so that they could fit furling booms that were aligned with the sheer for "aesthetics," whatever that means when the rest of your yacht looks like that...

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1 minute ago, Hell-Bent said:

She is a motorsailer first, but she draws about 8m and apparently has an observation pod moulded into the keel structure somewhere with big, foot-thick glass windows. A cool feature on a yacht that is otherwise abosolutely hideous and impractical. Her masts also had to be curved agressively and project well forward of their bases so that they could fit furling booms that were aligned with the sheer for "aesthetics," whatever that means when the rest of your yacht looks like that...

Good thing she’s a motorsailer.  Lots of power available to run the electrics, elevators taking the “sailors” from deck to deck so they won’t be too tired when it comes time to jump in the pool.

So much for sarcasm, I truly wonder just how much experience that the architect has in sailing vessels.  It seems to me that the mast and sails are not an afterthought, but more of a decoration.  She would be much better served as strictly a power boat.  She would gain a shallower draft, both air draft and water draft while loosing nothing more than the appearance of a sailboat.  I realize, green is in, but I don’t see much green in her.  In case anyone hasn’t guessed, I really don’t like this boat.  

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9 hours ago, Santanasailor said:

So much for sarcasm, I truly wonder just how much experience that the architect has in sailing vessels.

According to Wikipedia, Dykstra had a hand in it. Maybe that was the sailing part of this motorsailer. They have done both(?) Dynarig-boats (Maltese Falcon and Black Pearl) so they're familiar with unconventional rigs and unstayed masts.

I don't think it's very interesting or attractive as a sailing boat, nevertheless the sheer scale and engineering is something I can appreciate in a way. Speaking of scale, I think this would have to be one of my favorite pictures of it (or part of it at least): 

thumbnail_339566e8-3978-472a-8619-2fd0846507e1.jpg.04bfaedf9db58b95bb403be6d663ccbf.jpg

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19 hours ago, nogetwe said:

It has some cool design features (like a hidden under the water line anchor, which has fallen off in a seastate at least once and the 'windows'), but it is a flat bottom power boat with some sails on it.

yikes. I let out an involuntary sigh of relief - seriously, lol - when somebody posted an actual good looking boat other than that stupendous abomination named A. I guess it must a case of a real-life modern day version of the king with no clothes. Everybody just went along with this thing? nobody said don't do it, just stop? lol. I swear its so ugly its hard to believe its real. I have to think any and all involved in its creation must have shaken their heads every morning before going to work, and took a long hot shower after..

what a hull is supposed to look like: J-Class-Yacht.jpg

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20 hours ago, Elegua said:

I've seen her at the LM docks. I believe she has at least one circumnavigation under her belt. Not just a yacht club queen 

I think you’re mistaken.  Windwalker I, a sistership to my boat has a circumnavigation (or at least to NZ and back to NE US).  I don’t think WW2 ever did that.  

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14 minutes ago, eliboat said:

I think you’re mistaken.  Windwalker I, a sistership to my boat has a circumnavigation (or at least to NZ and back to NE US).  I don’t think WW2 ever did that.  

I could very well be wrong. You have a 49? 

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1 minute ago, Elegua said:

I could very well be wrong. You have a 49? 

46.  WW1 is a 44.  Only three 49s were built. Chewink, Finback and Narnia.  Finback might just be the perfect yacht (she was renamed a couple of years ago…not sure the new name). 

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39 minutes ago, eliboat said:

46.  WW1 is a 44.  Only three 49s were built. Chewink, Finback and Narnia.  Finback might just be the perfect yacht (she was renamed a couple of years ago…not sure the new name). 

Finback is pretty awesome. Now Quartet? Any of the 49's would make great cruising boats except for the varnished coachroof that makes them look so good. 

When they are on the docks I usually take a close look at any Seguins on the pier. They are usually well set up for offshore sailing. 

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21 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

I love this yacht.  My tastes have changed and do favor more modern designs, but, this just grabs my attention immediately.  A work of art in my opinion.  Probably sails like a witch too.  Windwalker is a Lyman Morse 60.

May be an image of body of water and nature

 

 

I believe I've actually toured this boat at the Newport Boat show years ago.  Maybe I imagined it.

Maui, you've got to be kidding. It only has one wheel!

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15 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Finback is pretty awesome. Quartet? Any of the 49's would make great cruising boats except for the varnished coachroof that makes them look so good. 

When they are on the docks I usually take a close look at any Seguins on the pier. They are usually well set up for offshore sailing. 

Aren't the 49s totally different designs, and k/cb? The 44 and 46 were both S&S, with the difference being the stern, as I recall. The 44/46 was basically a conservative IOR hull, but a very nice one.

I tried to get LM to sell me a 44 hull to finish off myself in the mid-80s. They wouldn't do it, but the boat I ended up building was finished off in a similar fashion, but without the varnished deckhouse of the Seguins.

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54 minutes ago, accnick said:

Aren't the 49s totally different designs, and k/cb? The 44 and 46 were both S&S, with the difference being the stern, as I recall. The 44/46 was basically a conservative IOR hull, but a very nice one.

I tried to get LM to sell me a 44 hull to finish off myself in the mid-80s. They wouldn't do it, but the boat I ended up building was finished off in a similar fashion, but without the varnished deckhouse of the Seguins.

49's are Hood designs I believe. 

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7 minutes ago, accnick said:

Cabot Lyman's Chewink was definitely a Hood design. She may have had a tandem centerboard arrangement.

Never heard of that.  Sounds intriguing.

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8 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

Never heard of that.  Sounds intriguing.

Some Ted Hood boats had a second CB aft for running down wind.  

 

24 minutes ago, accnick said:

Cabot Lyman's Chewink was definitely a Hood design. She may have had a tandem centerboard arrangement.

Not sure if Chewink has that.  I'll ask next time. 

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The 49's are Hood designs, and they have an aft board that you can deploy to tracking and balance; it's more like a skeg.  Pretty sure they all had it.  The only 49 that was really different was Narnia, as it was built for a giant guy, so there's like 8' of headroom in her, and consequently the cabin trunk looks out of proportion, whereas Finback and Chewink are beautifully proportioned. 

As for the disadvantage being the varnished cabin trunk, I will tell you that the cabin trunk, being a large sexy expanse of varnish on the Seguins (minus the 40's...I've never seen one with a varnished trunk), is actually the easiest piece of brightwork to maintain.  It's a large, easy to mask off surface.  Keeping it looking good isn't very hard, and is certainly worth the effort , as the boat looks quite a bit better with it than without it.  Now all the other varnish.... that's where it gets a lot tougher. The toe rail, hand rails, cockpit coaming, dorade boxes etc etc etc are much much more difficult to keep up.  I gave up for example on the trim around my deck hatches and painted them with Epifanes teak colored paint.  Looks terrific and I have no idea when I will need to recoat that! 

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8 hours ago, floater said:

yikes. I let out an involuntary sigh of relief - seriously, lol - when somebody posted an actual good looking boat other than that stupendous abomination named A. I guess it must a case of a real-life modern day version of the king with no clothes. Everybody just went along with this thing? nobody said don't do it, just stop? lol. I swear its so ugly its hard to believe its real. I have to think any and all involved in its creation must have shaken their heads every morning before going to work, and took a long hot shower after..

Thanks for that and I couldn't agree more. There's cool and "not cool". I'd post more boats here, but my tastes are a bit "off" from the mainstream. That being said, I like most of what most of you like.

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17 minutes ago, Russell Brown said:

Thanks for that and I couldn't agree more. There's cool and "not cool". I'd post more boats here, but my tastes are a bit "off" from the mainstream. That being said, I like most of what most of you like.

Variety is the spice of life and there are many flavors of cool. Please share...I'm quite positive you know of some cool boats. 

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10 hours ago, Bull City said:

Maui, you've got to be kidding. It only has one wheel!

I sailed his double wheeler on the delivery. It makes the grade!

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12 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

Thanks for that and I couldn't agree more. There's cool and "not cool". I'd post more boats here, but my tastes are a bit "off" from the mainstream. That being said, I like most of what most of you like.

to be fair, I think the poster above nailed it when he stated A is a motor boat, and not a sailboat. apparently the thing has no keel and the masts are vestigial. So, yeah, as a stupendously hideous motorboat it is a bit more understandable. lol.

and so yes, I have a suspicion the boats you like are good sailors. and if it sails well, what's not to like? 

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a stupendously hideous motorboat is much more acceptable than a stupendously hideous sailboat.

There's a lot more precedent.

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6 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

a stupendously hideous motorboat is much more acceptable than a stupendously hideous sailboat.

There's a lot more precedent.

Yes, that was settled in McGregor vs. Sea Ray in the U.S. Supreme Court. The doctrine of contributory negligence entered into the decision, and the Court noted the blurry line between sail and power with respect to McGregor.

image.png.4d832675c9e662b1e7c3eefa514138f7.png

 

image.thumb.png.8a4a842a0d5ff6fa861a2f94a471e558.png

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1 minute ago, Russell Brown said:

Should we vote on a rule where no hideous boats get posted here? This page is hard for me to look at.

I agree.  This page is starting to reminds me of Facebook Yacht Club, where the proportion of stinkpots has risen to bulimia-inducing levels.

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2 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

Should we vote on a rule where no hideous boats get posted here? This page is hard for me to look at.

Bleach Eyes GIFs | Tenor

I keep it on hand - not just for ugly boat. There's also Gay Santa, any VWAP post etc.

It's the Anarchy/Internet version of this;

 

smoke2.jpg

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1 hour ago, Russell Brown said:

Here's one:

DSC_9771.jpeg

That’s a hot boat! Reminds me of my favorite little cruiser, Nielsen’s Lucy, which I’m pretty sure has already made an appearance on this thread. 
 

 

81BF4AE7-5F70-4CD8-A653-7099F5353415.jpeg

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15 hours ago, Bull City said:

Yes, that was settled in McGregor vs. Sea Ray in the U.S. Supreme Court. The doctrine of contributory negligence entered into the decision, and the Court noted the blurry line between sail and power with respect to McGregor.

image.png.4d832675c9e662b1e7c3eefa514138f7.png

 

I will not offend by posting directly - but there is a boat that makes the Mac26 look relatively good looking in comparison. lol. so, for the morbidly curious, its that thing that happens when you let your stoned boat yard employee just sort of randomly stick a few windows in the hull.

https://forums.sailinganarchy.com/uploads/monthly_2022_01/bucca.jpg.0289fe9b9db5076a2d361f8305d0d584.jpg

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4 minutes ago, floater said:

I will not offend by posting directly - but there is a boat that makes the Mac26 look relatively good looking in comparison. lol. so, for the morbidly curious:https://forums.sailinganarchy.com/uploads/monthly_2022_01/bucca.jpg.0289fe9b9db5076a2d361f8305d0d584.jpg

There's at least one of those in my marina and I can say with absolute certainty that you are right. 

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2 hours ago, floater said:

I will not offend by posting directly - but there is a boat that makes the Mac26 look relatively good looking in comparison. lol. so, for the morbidly curious, its that thing that happens when you let your stoned boat yard employee just sort of randomly stick a few windows in the hull.

https://forums.sailinganarchy.com/uploads/monthly_2022_01/bucca.jpg.0289fe9b9db5076a2d361f8305d0d584.jpg 53.97 kB · 0 downloads

That has been posted several times in the Uglyboat Admiration thread, which has sadly slid down the page rankings. I'll have to rescuscitate it, to stop Ugly from being posted in Cool.

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On 1/9/2022 at 5:39 PM, accnick said:

Cabot Lyman's Chewink was definitely a Hood design. She may have had a tandem centerboard arrangement.

Hood was an absolute genius.

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1 hour ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

Hood was an absolute genius.

But not always an easy man to work for or with. (I worked for him on a powerboat design subcontract for the better part of a year.)

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On 1/9/2022 at 12:43 PM, Hell-Bent said:

She is a motorsailer first, but she draws about 8m and apparently has an observation pod moulded into the keel structure somewhere with big, foot-thick glass windows. A cool feature on a yacht that is otherwise abosolutely hideous and impractical. Her masts also had to be curved agressively and project well forward of their bases so that they could fit furling booms that were aligned with the sheer for "aesthetics," whatever that means when the rest of your yacht looks like that...

Sorry to bring "it" up again, but what would one realistically see from a pod 8 meters below the surface? I'd hope you'd still be a long way from the seafloor unless someone really fucked things up?

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1 hour ago, [email protected] said:

Sorry to bring "it" up again, but what would one realistically see from a pod 8 meters below the surface? I'd hope you'd still be a long way from the seafloor unless someone really fucked things up?

Whales and people with limpet mines.

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1 hour ago, [email protected] said:

Sorry to bring "it" up again, but what would one realistically see from a pod 8 meters below the surface? I'd hope you'd still be a long way from the seafloor unless someone really fucked things up?

I don't think that the pod is actually 8 meters down. It sounds from the description and renders that it's quite close to the surface and may even rest right up against the bottom of the hull, or close to it as the propellers seem to be almost in line with it. That said, it could just be the size of the yacht messing with me as, having grown up on the west coast of Canada, I don't really have a good sense of scale when it comes to vessels of that size.

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Since we here are the official coolkeepers and beauty pageant jurors and the question was asked on something that is called a 'Vront-Paige' (?): Is it cool?

solar-wing.jpg

I don't know.

It looks like people that think of a Landy as a 'highly practical car' will love it. 

 

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