Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 16.4k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Does it come with a codpiece?  And I can easily singlehand or cruise with the wife and no crew. I say that a lot when I see an exotic, beautiful car, or a mansion that is just too f'n big

Posted Images

Thanks Pom. That is so cool. I have two questions:

Can you find hull lines for any of those boats. I'd really like to see OBERON's lines to see how close the stern shape is to FRANKIE.

How much HP are those steam engines putting out.

 

The magic of long and skinny.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The club at the lake used an old 6X6 to power the travel lift for years. in fact, it was just retired in favour of an old Case 4x4 tractor this year. 3 or for years ago a member had the 6x6 jump the blocks sending the travel lift and the 6x6 down the ramp. all you could see of the truck was the top few inches of the cab. they hauled the whole mess out, drained and replaced the fluids, let it dry out for a few days and bob's your uncle she fired right up!

 

That's pretty cool. Launch the boat, drive the truck onto the boat and you're off.

Come to think of it, one could probably find a way to load both the trailer and the truck and be totally amphibious.


And, with a deuce and a half, you can back down the ramp until the driver's seat is awash.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob, I'm pretty sure all those steam launches are part of the museum on Windermere, a lake in the north of England.

 

http://www.steamboats.org.uk/

 

Dunno about hull lines.

 

A small version of Turbinia with a steam turbine, rather than a reciprocating engine would be fun.

 

Hull lines should be around, maybe not easily available. Bob might be able to pry them loose, however.

 

Built 1999-00 by Paul Smith at Kintbury.

Designed by Paul Smith.

Fit-out by Paul Smith.

LOA: 29', LWL: 28', Beam: 5', Draft: 10", Displacement: About 0.9 ton..

Plywood (¼"), epoxy sheathed

Two chine, black hull with varnished mahogany decks and cockpits, wheel steering.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob, I'm pretty sure all those steam launches are part of the museum on Windermere, a lake in the north of England.

 

http://www.steamboats.org.uk/

 

Dunno about hull lines.

 

A small version of Turbinia with a steam turbine, rather than a reciprocating engine would be fun.

 

Y'know, I've thunk that same thought. I even got a small turbine rotor to use some day, but really never got past the vague-plan stage. Other problems include getting a reduction gear (which Turbinia herself did not have, but would vastly improve efficiency) and stability.

 

http://www.nationalhistoricships.org.uk/register/138/turbinia

 

Very cool boat, though

 

FB- Doug

Link to post
Share on other sites

Especially when you can remember the first Whitbreads taking nearly 200 days. Chichester was Knighted for doing it in 9 months. :D

 

I'll bet that is one miserable 45 days though - like riding a rodeo bronc continuously for 45 days.

Especially after reading the specs.

 

Shower: None

Head: Portable

 

I must be getting old, I'll pass on that trip round the marble.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This popped up on my radar. Maybe you've seen it. Sorry can't go back through 38 pages.

 

DYI Dutch built double - ender, from felled trees to sailing on the water. 25 minutes of superb hand craftsmanship. I think the B&W picture in the beginning is the designer. Set to the Brandenberg Concertos. Bob, I think you'll like this one if you haven't already seen it. Hope not.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

This popped up on my radar. Maybe you've seen it. Sorry can't go back through 38 pages.

 

DYI Dutch built double - ender, from felled trees to sailing on the water. 25 minutes of superb hand craftsmanship. I think the B&W picture in the beginning is the designer. Set to the Brandenberg Concertos. Bob, I think you'll like this one if you haven't already seen it. Hope not.

 

Great story.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This popped up on my radar. Maybe you've seen it. Sorry can't go back through 38 pages.

DYI Dutch built double - ender, from felled trees to sailing on the water. 25 minutes of superb hand craftsmanship. I think the B&W picture in the beginning is the designer. Set to the Brandenberg Concertos. Bob, I think you'll like this one if you haven't already seen it. Hope not.

Colin Archer. A boat that shape could only be one of his.

 

See there's a webpage. http://colinarcheremma.com/

 

Under sail

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

This popped up on my radar. Maybe you've seen it. Sorry can't go back through 38 pages.

DYI Dutch built double - ender, from felled trees to sailing on the water. 25 minutes of superb hand craftsmanship. I think the B&W picture in the beginning is the designer. Set to the Brandenberg Concertos. Bob, I think you'll like this one if you haven't already seen it. Hope not.

Colin Archer. A boat that shape could only be one of his.

 

See there's a webpage. http://colinarcheremma.com/

 

Under sail

 

 

The Archer brothers have an interesting history in Queensland Australia where they explored and opened up new land as pioneers there. Colin Archer went there in his early 20s to work with his brothers and was credited with sailing the first vessel up the Fitzroy River to what is present day Rockhampton.

 

A very hot, remote and tough beginning to a working life and a contrast to his boatbuilding/designing career later in Norway.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This popped up on my radar. Maybe you've seen it. Sorry can't go back through 38 pages.

 

DYI Dutch built double - ender, from felled trees to sailing on the water. 25 minutes of superb hand craftsmanship. I think the B&W picture in the beginning is the designer. Set to the Brandenberg Concertos. Bob, I think you'll like this one if you haven't already seen it. Hope not.

 

Thanks for that one SC. Absolutely breathtaking. I wonder what the combined years of experience are for the crew that put Emma together. In today's age of plastic and carbon boats it is so cool to see people with the knowledge and skills to build one the "old fashioned" way. Just amazing!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ooooh! Long and skinny! I love it!

 

What they use now. 4.3 litre V6. They've got ?4? of the things, built over the years. One of the things about coaching a crew at Henley - you plus a guest get to ride the lauch with the umpire behind you crew.

w

umpire-launch.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

This popped up on my radar. Maybe you've seen it. Sorry can't go back through 38 pages.

 

DYI Dutch built double - ender, from felled trees to sailing on the water. 25 minutes of superb hand craftsmanship. I think the B&W picture in the beginning is the designer. Set to the Brandenberg Concertos. Bob, I think you'll like this one if you haven't already seen it. Hope not.

 

Thanks for that one SC. Absolutely breathtaking. I wonder what the combined years of experience are for the crew that put Emma together. In today's age of plastic and carbon boats it is so cool to see people with the knowledge and skills to build one the "old fashioned" way. Just amazing!

 

Yes, wow. The range of skills displayed by the builder alone were amazing.

 

Thanks for posting, I really enjoyed watching it, moments of "why such a huge winch" to "ah, you're lifting a small tree up a large tree…"

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Ooooh! Long and skinny! I love it!

 

What they use now. 4.3 litre V6. They've got ?4? of the things, built over the years. One of the things about coaching a crew at Henley - you plus a guest get to ride the lauch with the umpire behind you crew.

w

umpire-launch.jpg

I bet that thing still sends a tidal wave up the bank though.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

This popped up on my radar. Maybe you've seen it. Sorry can't go back through 38 pages.

DYI Dutch built double - ender, from felled trees to sailing on the water. 25 minutes of superb hand craftsmanship. I think the B&W picture in the beginning is the designer. Set to the Brandenberg Concertos. Bob, I think you'll like this one if you haven't already seen it. Hope not.

Colin Archer. A boat that shape could only be one of his.

See there's a webpage. http://colinarcheremma.com/

Under sail

 

 

Thanks for digging that up. She is lovely, splendid under under sail. Pretty sail plan too. Should I be surprised she moves so well?

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Ooooh! Long and skinny! I love it!

 

What they use now. 4.3 litre V6. They've got ?4? of the things, built over the years. One of the things about coaching a crew at Henley - you plus a guest get to ride the lauch with the umpire behind you crew.

w

umpire-launch.jpg

Love it!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Ooooh! Long and skinny! I love it!

 

What they use now. 4.3 litre V6. They've got ?4? of the things, built over the years. One of the things about coaching a crew at Henley - you plus a guest get to ride the lauch with the umpire behind you crew.

w

umpire-launch.jpg

 

I guess a V6 makes a lot of sense but I can't help feeling that a boat that looks like that should make "pocketa pocketa' noises

Link to post
Share on other sites

On the topic of coaching launches, the catamarans are cool. Here are two "Stillwater" launches:

 

25XLvs25Cbw.jpg

 

And here's the Platt-form 19:

 

The catamarans are cool. Here's a different approach for a different purpose.

I'm building a larger version of the Water bug with 20 HP that will allow longer range cruising and sleeping aboard. Water bug has been a great ride for many rears and and lots of long trips.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Has Innismara been mentioned? 67.5' x 10.3' makes her very narrow. In New Zealand. Trying to find a picture under sail.

 

http://classicyacht.org.nz/cyaforum/topic/innismara-2/

 

Bernie Schmidt began building his own design in a Penrose shed in the early 1960s. He had strong ideas of his own but in many ways this new boat was similar to his earlier Young designed and built 42 foot Shemarra. But the new boat was extremely long in proportion to Shemarra and yet light displacement - and became the 67 foot Innismara. Schmidt built it in strip planked, nailed kauri with convex edges but without fiberglass sheathing which was considered unacceptable construction by local wise men however despite criticisms of amateurism, he worked on and finally finished Innismara nearing the end of the decade. Innismara was radical, very long, thin and flat with a deep draft keel. Young when he first saw the yacht in the Penrose shed thought, Poor old Bernie, looks like this will bend itself in half, going to be a dog but I was wrong. And John Vause, crew on Millers Stewart 34 Pioneer, called her the long pointed tube with sails. The yacht was fast, designed for reaching and running and on these points of sail the long waterline and lightweight hull excelled. Schmidt wanted to take the yacht offshore but official criticism along with rejection of the design and construction destroyed his plans Innismara instead became a regular Gulf racer and performed far beyond what critics believed possible. Again retrospectively, the construction method and design, called dangerously bad by officials, has survived well for Innismara is still alive and has logged many hard miles under its keel.

post-81201-0-85540800-1416978082_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Aramoana B23 is a fine classic and one of the last yachts designed by Arch Logan. She was built in 1938 by Bill Couldrey in Northcote, of kauri construction with three skin diagonal hull and double skin deck, with mahogany and teak used in the cockpit and cabin. Aramoana has an illustrious race record with RNZYS B class from her heyday and remains in great condition following major refits in 1989 and 2006 and a complete re-paint in 2013. Berthed with other classics at Heritage Landing, Silo Marina, Westhaven, courtesy of CYA.

 

Construction: Kauri three skin diagonal hull, double skinned deck

Dimensions: LOA 3810, LWL 27, Beam 86, Draft 56

Displacement: 6 tonnes

post-81201-0-13693500-1416979595_thumb.jpg

post-81201-0-58710300-1416979613_thumb.jpg

post-81201-0-52813800-1416979630_thumb.jpg

post-81201-0-46778500-1416979646_thumb.jpg

post-81201-0-07821500-1416979659_thumb.jpg

post-81201-0-76822700-1416979673_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

On the topic of coaching launches, the catamarans are cool. Here are two "Stillwater" launches:

 

25XLvs25Cbw.jpg

 

And here's the Platt-form 19:

 

 

The cats are an excellent no wake solution. Wake is a big deal on those rivers.

 

Most people just pick up a shitty old polyprop beach cat and use that as a base these days. I'd agree it now really the same.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I probably built both of those boats

 

I was looking around for that huge one that Princeton had--designed by some other guy--but couldn't find it. That was quite a rig.

 

I need to get some better photos of mine. There's a reason yacht owners hire Billy Black. His photos are good.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

+1 @ Southern Cross... that's a cool trailer for what looks like and interesting movie to come, ta for that. When we were anchored off Île-à-Vache, Haiti we saw some pretty basic local built craft, but most seaworthy they were, the lack of physcial cash on the isle means if you don't make it or catch it yourself... you go without.

 

'Necessity is the mother of invention', rings very true....

 

The style of the edit reminded me of this movie byy KAAPS....

 

http://vimeo.com/8451943

Link to post
Share on other sites

Has Innismara been mentioned? 67.5' x 10.3' makes her very narrow. In New Zealand. Trying to find a picture under sail.

 

http://classicyacht.org.nz/cyaforum/topic/innismara-2/

 

Bernie Schmidt began building his own design in a Penrose shed in the early 1960s. He had strong ideas of his own but in many ways this new boat was similar to his earlier Young designed and built 42 foot Shemarra. But the new boat was extremely long in proportion to Shemarra and yet light displacement - and became the 67 foot Innismara. Schmidt built it in strip planked, nailed kauri with convex edges but without fiberglass sheathing which was considered unacceptable construction by local wise men however despite criticisms of amateurism, he worked on and finally finished Innismara nearing the end of the decade. Innismara was radical, very long, thin and flat with a deep draft keel. Young when he first saw the yacht in the Penrose shed thought, Poor old Bernie, looks like this will bend itself in half, going to be a dog but I was wrong. And John Vause, crew on Millers Stewart 34 Pioneer, called her the long pointed tube with sails. The yacht was fast, designed for reaching and running and on these points of sail the long waterline and lightweight hull excelled. Schmidt wanted to take the yacht offshore but official criticism along with rejection of the design and construction destroyed his plans Innismara instead became a regular Gulf racer and performed far beyond what critics believed possible. Again retrospectively, the construction method and design, called dangerously bad by officials, has survived well for Innismara is still alive and has logged many hard miles under its keel.

Wow. She looks stunning again.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Those Currie boats look good. I believe they are a development of a Quarter tonner he built in the late 70's. Always wondered how they'd stack up against a SJ 24 - they look very similar.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Those Currie boats look good. I believe they are a development of a Quarter tonner he built in the late 70's. Always wondered how they'd stack up against a SJ 24 - they look very similar.

 

We could set a derelict adrift in a Currie and see if he beats Rimas to Samoa.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never been a huge fan of the whaler Morgan at Mystic Seaport. I do understand that it's probably their most important artifact, but frankly, i'm just not that much into whaling. That said, I think the Seaport deserves big props for getting the boat into something like seaworthy condition and sailing it around New England. Especially because they did sail it, and not just gingerly tow her around in calm weather. So good for them!

 

 

 

Morganonroutetonewport.jpg

 

The Seaport sent a self-congratulatory ("Epic Voyage!") brochure out to their members (and why not) which includes a little map of the voyage. I was surprised to see that it includes a passage through Quick's Hole on the passage from Vineyard Haven to New Bedford. If they really did do that, I'm surprised. It's not so much that it's difficult or dangerous, but that they really would have been second-guessed if anything had gone wrong. It's fairly tight, there rocks (which are marked), and the current can be strong. I assume they had a fair wind.

 

1-screen_shot_2012-11-11_at_9.59.14_pm.j

Link to post
Share on other sites

post-22256-0-14382800-1417880509_thumb.jpg

 

Back when I was growing up in the 60s in the SF bay area there was a very cool little boat named Spirit.

She was SS designed 33' 29' wl 8'6" beam.

I came a across an article in an old Woodenboat magazine (156) A few bits from said article.

 

"Spirit didn't have an engine-wasn't built with one-and they wanted to bring her around and do some east coast racing,so they left SF, went south,got someone to drag them through the Panama Canal,and came on up to Florida,arriving just after the start of the Venice race.They spun around on the starting line,having sailed nonstop from Panama,and set off in hot pursuit of the first racers that year in the SORC. Then she came up the East Coast,did the Onion Patch- a series of races leading up to the Bermuda Race- She was allowed to enter the Bermuda race after a letter from Rod Stephens called her a "pretty wholesome boat". After Bermuda she raced the transatlantic to Copenhagen. Spirit spent a winter in Europe then did the Fastnet,Cowes Week and other European races. She sailed back across the Atlantic to do the SORC races then got trucked from Florida to California. Later,she did a couple of transpacs including the Tahiti race and then the Sydney-Hobart."

Most all of this was done with no standing headroom, no engine and a bucket!

 

"In 1964 Spirit won her class in the Acapulco race,the 66 Bermuda race and that years Transatlantic to Denmark. She took first in class and first overall in the 1,700 mile Flemish Cap-to-St. Kilda race in 1966; second in the '67 Burnam week regatta; first in the '67 Fastnet and first in the'68 RORC season championship. In the pacific she sailed to 4th overall in the 1970 Tahiti race, first overall in the Suva to Auckland. They were continuing to kick butt in the '71 Sydney-Hobart until the rudder broke off."

And that my friends, I think, makes for a very cool boat.

If you can get your hands on Woodenboat # 156 do so,it's good read.

The lines for her are in there,I'll try and scan them and put them up.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

attachicon.gifIMG_0003 (Medium).jpg

 

Back when I was growing up in the 60s in the SF bay area there was a very cool little boat named Spirit.

She was SS designed 33' 29' wl 8'6" beam.

I came a across an article in an old Woodenboat magazine (156) A few bits from said article.

 

"Spirit didn't have an engine-wasn't built with one-and they wanted to bring her around and do some east coast racing,so they left SF, went south,got someone to drag them through the Panama Canal,and came on up to Florida,arriving just after the start of the Venice race.They spun around on the starting line,having sailed nonstop from Panama,and set off in hot pursuit of the first racers that year in the SORC. Then she came up the East Coast,did the Onion Patch- a series of races leading up to the Bermuda Race- She was allowed to enter the Bermuda race after a letter from Rod Stephens called her a "pretty wholesome boat". After Bermuda she raced the transatlantic to Copenhagen. Spirit spent a winter in Europe then did the Fastnet,Cowes Week and other European races. She sailed back across the Atlantic to do the SORC races then got trucked from Florida to California. Later,she did a couple of transpacs including the Tahiti race and then the Sydney-Hobart."

Most all of this was done with no standing headroom, no engine and a bucket!

 

"In 1964 Spirit won her class in the Acapulco race,the 66 Bermuda race and that years Transatlantic to Denmark. She took first in class and first overall in the 1,700 mile Flemish Cap-to-St. Kilda race in 1966; second in the '67 Burnam week regatta; first in the '67 Fastnet and first in the'68 RORC season championship. In the pacific she sailed to 4th overall in the 1970 Tahiti race, first overall in the Suva to Auckland. They were continuing to kick butt in the '71 Sydney-Hobart until the rudder broke off."

And that my friends, I think, makes for a very cool boat.

If you can get your hands on Woodenboat # 156 do so,it's good read.

The lines for her are in there,I'll try and scan them and put them up.

 

Info here on S&S blog..

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I wasn't certain where to post this, but it's cool, and I like it so it's going here. I wonder if he has peddles in this thing?

 

boat2.jpg

Add a mast ... Its the same guy?

 

They do look like they're the same boat, don't they?

 

However, the sailing version certainly wants to become a submarine. Dive, Dive, Dive... aooga, aooga, aooga

 

Personally, I prefer the "cuddy cabin" powerboat/peddle-boat version.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Those Currie boats look good. I believe they are a development of a Quarter tonner he built in the late 70's. Always wondered how they'd stack up against a SJ 24 - they look very similar.

Fabulous little boats. I'm not sure Clint (Cletus) Currie was really looking to make it into a quarter tonner and those boats would kill a SJ 24 etc in a heartbeat. Clint won his division in his own boat years & years. He sold it too a friend and it just kept going. I'm going to say there were only 2 built, maybe 3, but great performance & quality. Why someone hasn't grabbed that boat yet is anybody's guess. Maybe it's a little bit of an orphan but? There are a hell of lot lesser boats at the size and price.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I wasn't certain where to post this, but it's cool, and I like it so it's going here. I wonder if he has peddles in this thing?

 

boat2.jpg

Add a mast ... Its the same guy?

Hah... That's a friend of mine in the Frosty. Definitely not the same people. Funny dude.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted at the request on Tom Ray. A Gil Smith Great South Bay catboat. Absolutely fabulous ass!

 

 

10750336_10154903269385092_2651713517599

 

I love that pic - that particular issue of Wooden Boat is in the magazine basket in my family reading room. This is the kinda thing we all learned to sail on - no slugs/winches, just wood/rope hoops and blocks. My very first sail was @ 9, in an old crabbing skiff. Got to go on my uncle's skipjack a bit later that summer, after I learned how to stay outta the way.

 

Back to this boat - I LOVE that old catboat, perfect for the shallow water and muddy bottoms of the Eastern Shore.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Being a NJ boy by birth and upbringing, I have to offer the Barnegat Bay A-Cats:

 

DSC_4347.JPG

 

An A-Cat is just about twice a Laser all around: twice as long, twice as wide, 4 times as much sail, 8 times the weight. Unballasted. Likes a lot of weight on the rail. Also with a weather helm.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mooner:

I'll be picky. NOT grumpy, just picky. Damn it.

 

"have to admit I couldn't keep my eyes off that ass..." assman?

 

I'm not keen on how the hollow is forced in the stern of that catboat. Look at the waterlines. See around station 7.5 there is an abrupt change of shape and this "kink" goes all the way to the stern.

It's a pretty transom no doubt but I prefer the stern on the A-Cat. There is no hollow aft on the A-Cat and to my eye this is a better shape for boat speed. I like to push the water down as long as I can and only relieve it to provide a clean wake for lower drag. But I like both of these boats. To complain about weather helm on one of these catboats is a but like saying, "I love those old MG's but they have such a hard suspension." It's just part of the fun.

Link to post
Share on other sites

attachicon.gifIMG_0003 (Medium).jpg

 

Back when I was growing up in the 60s in the SF bay area there was a very cool little boat named Spirit.

She was SS designed 33' 29' wl 8'6" beam.

I came a across an article in an old Woodenboat magazine (156) A few bits from said article.

 

"Spirit didn't have an engine-wasn't built with one-and they wanted to bring her around and do some east coast racing,so they left SF, went south,got someone to drag them through the Panama Canal,and came on up to Florida,arriving just after the start of the Venice race.They spun around on the starting line,having sailed nonstop from Panama,and set off in hot pursuit of the first racers that year in the SORC. Then she came up the East Coast,did the Onion Patch- a series of races leading up to the Bermuda Race- She was allowed to enter the Bermuda race after a letter from Rod Stephens called her a "pretty wholesome boat". After Bermuda she raced the transatlantic to Copenhagen. Spirit spent a winter in Europe then did the Fastnet,Cowes Week and other European races. She sailed back across the Atlantic to do the SORC races then got trucked from Florida to California. Later,she did a couple of transpacs including the Tahiti race and then the Sydney-Hobart."

Most all of this was done with no standing headroom, no engine and a bucket!

 

"In 1964 Spirit won her class in the Acapulco race,the 66 Bermuda race and that years Transatlantic to Denmark. She took first in class and first overall in the 1,700 mile Flemish Cap-to-St. Kilda race in 1966; second in the '67 Burnam week regatta; first in the '67 Fastnet and first in the'68 RORC season championship. In the pacific she sailed to 4th overall in the 1970 Tahiti race, first overall in the Suva to Auckland. They were continuing to kick butt in the '71 Sydney-Hobart until the rudder broke off."

And that my friends, I think, makes for a very cool boat.

If you can get your hands on Woodenboat # 156 do so,it's good read.

The lines for her are in there,I'll try and scan them and put them up

I can vaguely remember she put in a appearance in Auckland.

here is one for sale.

http://www.trademe.co.nz/motors/boats-marine/yachts/keeler/auction-820869183.htm

Link to post
Share on other sites

...To complain about weather helm on one of these catboats is a but like saying, "I love those old MG's but they have such a hard suspension." It's just part of the fun.

 

 

That was my thought upon seeing such a complaint. Of course it has weather helm. It's a catboat and it is sailing!

 

If it gets too bad, get more/fatter guys up on the side. Or reef. But before it gets too bad it is indeed part of the fun. :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Posted at the request on Tom Ray. A Gil Smith Great South Bay catboat. Absolutely fabulous ass!

 

 

10750336_10154903269385092_2651713517599

 

I love that pic - that particular issue of Wooden Boat is in the magazine basket in my family reading room. This is the kinda thing we all learned to sail on - no slugs/winches, just wood/rope hoops and blocks. My very first sail was @ 9, in an old crabbing skiff. Got to go on my uncle's skipjack a bit later that summer, after I learned how to stay outta the way.

 

Back to this boat - I LOVE that old catboat, perfect for the shallow water and muddy bottoms of the Eastern Shore.

 

Pics like that are why I say I've never seen a boat that was too beamy for me.

 

To look at anyway.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone's gotta do it. Thanks to Mr. Moon for posting the round catboat for me.

 

There's a coolboat over in the "restore this classic" thread. Steamflyer suggested it should be here and I agree. And its motorboat friend too.

 

... ...

Here is are two of our boats.

041-1.jpg

 

and

 

 

...

For Steamflyer, Dove is a 1946 William Atkins ActiveIII dory ketch. She was built in Connecticut by a man named M. Park. She has Gambel and Hunter sails in the egyptian cottton colored dacron, and all here running rigging is hemp, from Langeman in Holland. She is fairly heavy and needs more than a puff to get going, but an easy boat to sail, and very well behaved in 20 knots of wind.

 

015-4.jpg

 



Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone's gotta do it. Thanks to Mr. Moon for posting the round catboat for me.

 

There's a coolboat over in the "restore this classic" thread. Steamflyer suggested it should be here and I agree. And its motorboat friend too.

 

... ...

 

Here is are two of our boats.

 

041-1.jpg

 

and

 

 

>

...

For Steamflyer, Dove is a 1946 William Atkins ActiveIII dory ketch. She was built in Connecticut by a man named M. Park. She has Gambel and Hunter sails in the egyptian cottton colored dacron, and all here running rigging is hemp, from Langeman in Holland. She is fairly heavy and needs more than a puff to get going, but an easy boat to sail, and very well behaved in 20 knots of wind.

 

015-4.jpg

 

 

 

 

Nice.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you. People walk down the dock and the constant phrase is "It must be a labour of love"..... to which I usually reply "Sometimes it's just a goddamn labour"

 

On really bad days when you hear the phrase more than once, you feel like jamming a sharp chisel into the dark part of the spectators left eye........ :angry:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you. People walk down the dock and the constant phrase is "It must be a labour of love"..... to which I usually reply "Sometimes it's just a goddamn labour"

 

On really bad days when you hear the phrase more than once, you feel like jamming a sharp chisel into the dark part of the spectators left eye........ :angry:

 

Sharp pencils work just fine, plus you can use the rubber end as a warning.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is cool boat designed by one of Cruising Anarchy's resident designers, Yves-Marie de Tanton.

 

This model is a 12-meter (40') MBCC (Modern British Channel Cutter) that was built in steel in Turkey.

 

http://tantonyachtdesign.blogspot.com/2013/11/launching.html

Shame about that cabin and coach roof design. She definitely could have been much sweeter looking without any loss of functionality, IMO.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As much of a YMT fan as I am I think I'll go with Sailby on that cabin trunk. That forward raking windshield is a very strong design element and has to be done with finesse and care. It's subjective. I can assure you that this will be a very good sailing boat and that's objective.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Here is cool boat designed by one of Cruising Anarchy's resident designers, Yves-Marie de Tanton.

 

This model is a 12-meter (40') MBCC (Modern British Channel Cutter) that was built in steel in Turkey.

 

http://tantonyachtdesign.blogspot.com/2013/11/launching.html

Shame about that cabin and coach roof design. She definitely could have been much sweeter looking without any loss of functionality, IMO.

 

I kind of like that coach roof, but one ala Boreal would definitely more streamlined.

 

Simple can be cool, people have just gotten used to fancy. Back in the late 1960's I knew people who raked the following design over the coals, because it had telephone poles for masts, and clamps in its rigging, but look what it accomplished with its skipper!

 

jeudi_9_octobre_2008_04.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

As much of a YMT fan as I am I think I'll go with Sailby on that cabin trunk. That forward raking windshield is a very strong design element and has to be done with finesse and care. It's subjective. I can assure you that this will be a very good sailing boat and that's objective.

Yves has a Bolgeresque side to him I think, a sort of " it works so what is your problem?" flair.

 

Reminds me of the advice of one of my teachers " the key to a satisfying life is to be inconsistently inconsistent".

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Olaf:

send me a pm with your mailing address. Santa might be good to you this year.

 

"Reminds me of the advice of one of my teachers " the key to a satisfying life is to be inconsistently inconsistent".

 

I like that. Kind of reminds me of the advice I was given in college by a short, fat, bald Jesuit, "Get out of my classroom you phony disciple!"

Link to post
Share on other sites

A little different approach to a MBCC or MBPC(modern Bristol pilot cutter)

 

By the way ,i like that forward raking windshield it has his own character

 

Is that your new ride, Aka?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Olaf:

send me a pm with your mailing address. Santa might be good to you this year.

 

"Reminds me of the advice of one of my teachers " the key to a satisfying life is to be inconsistently inconsistent".

 

I like that. Kind of reminds me of the advice I was given in college by a short, fat, bald Jesuit, "Get out of my classroom you phony disciple!"

I sent an email, I think your inbox is full

Link to post
Share on other sites