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The forward raking windshield is very practical. You hardly see a fishing boat in the PNW built in the last 30 years without the forward raked windshield. Given the abrupt and orthogonal ends on YMT's boat I might have been inclined to go with a softer shape to the house but I'll bet you this feature was client driven and chosen for its practicality.

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I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

Does it come with a codpiece?  And I can easily singlehand or cruise with the wife and no crew. I say that a lot when I see an exotic, beautiful car, or a mansion that is just too f'n big

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The forward raking windshield is very practical. You hardly see a fishing boat in the PNW built in the last 30 years without the forward raked windshield. Given the abrupt and orthogonal ends on YMT's boat I might have been inclined to go with a softer shape to the house but I'll bet you this feature was client driven and chosen for its practicality.

ALISON_zps9fe1b1ca.jpg

 

20 years ago, even the East Coast Canadian guys in the Maritimes started to adopt that--which went very much against convention but is very noticeably better in terms of glare. It is often referred to as a "Western" windscreen. Haha.

 

Here's one built by a friend of mine:

 

http://www.novimarinebrokers.com/Broker/viewListing/?listing_id=13904&b=1575

fishing_boat_LOBSTER_for_sale_4191.jpg?w

 

 

And Bob, it goes without saying but your cartoons are really really great.

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Rozema is about 40 minutes up the road from me. I stop in from time to time. They build a lot of fishing boats. That trawler yacht is a beauty.

Also consider the forward raked windscreen offers advantages in to interior volume and headroom while adding to available deck space. The conventionally raked windscreen intrudes on available headroom and eats up available deck space.

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I knew somebody would ask that FB. It's tricky to envision (I could show you in a sketch in 5 seconds) but imagine a wheel position and where the helmsman would sit or stand. You need some room ahead of the wheel for installation of gear and you need headroom over the helm position allowing for normal human movement. So fix that headroom point over the helm position, add some tolerance for normal movement and start your conventionally raked windscreen from there. It goes well forward till it intersects the deck plane. This eats up available deck area while converting it to overly generous and useless "dashboard" area inside. Sometimes this "dashboard" area is used as a chart table. The reverse rake is a win/ win in both of these areas. It does not intrude forward into the available deck space and it provides even more headroom inside, measured fore and aft to give a feeling of spaciousness and getting rid of the feeling that you might smack your head on the windscreen in a sea.. And,,,it reduces glare and looks salty as hell.

 

I sincerely doubt that this has anything at all with wealthy English people indulging in shabby chique.

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Maybe it's me at the tail end of a long week, but how does it add to available deckspace?

Because for a given minimum useable pilothouse area, you have more area outside the pilothouse. With a conventionally sloped windscreen, the area under the windscreen is unusable. Obviously there is some dependence on the specifics of the arrangement and especially where electronic equip is located etc but that's the basic idea.

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Raspy:

 

I agree. The Portuguese bridge and reverse rake windscreen is like Stilton and vintage port, a perfect combination.

I'm pretty sure Rozema does all in house design. I'd stop by and offer them my design services but they do such a great job on their own I don't think I can contribute anything. Shitski! Their fish boats are beautiful.

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Some owners insist on the conventional windscreen and you just have to go with them:

 

3882629603_cdf9d049ea_b.jpg

See the helmsman standing there? See all that wasted space forward? See how all there is is a toe-space to walk around? Cleaning the windows is difficult. But the look is important to this boat. The customer wanted it that way.

Here is an example where the sloping windshied is a departure from a traditional vertical one. In this case, it cuts into the walking space outside the pilothouse a bit, but not much. Again, this was client-driven. The glare factor is really important. (But not to all operators--see previous).

4906459822_a4845416e2_b.jpg

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As much of a YMT fan as I am I think I'll go with Sailby on that cabin trunk. That forward raking windshield is a very strong design element and has to be done with finesse and care. It's subjective. I can assure you that this will be a very good sailing boat and that's objective.

I quite like the cabin trunk. It has a sort of irreverent irony to it.

 

The hull and rig indicate a well-thought-out sailing machine, which could have looked quite yachty. But the cabin trunk appears to have taken straight off a fishing boat, squishing that image. It's also a very practical design -- there's a reason fishing boats use that shape.

 

The combination of fine hull design and unrefined coach roof is the sort of thing that some of the British aristocracy do. Let the dog sleep on the antique sofa, wear clothes fit for a scarecrow, eat off chipped and cracked plates and hack the roast meat apart with gardening tools. They can do it because they don't need to prove anything; they still own half the county, so people don't need to be reminded to defer to them. These scruffy toffs actually take pride in being frugal with small things, and look disdainfully at those who they deride as nouveaux riches for "trying too hard" to display wealth.

 

This fishing-boat cabintop would fit perfectly with some of those scruffy toffs.

 

A left-wing English parliamentarian was on TV recently describing her son's experience at the posh private school to which she had sent him (causing outrage among her political allies). Their home is in a fairly poor area of London, although with some gentrification amidst the poverty. Her sons friends at his local primary school all wore expensive branded trainers, and sneered at those wearing cheaper supermarket shoes. This was reversed at the private school, where the children of very wealthy parents wore cheap shoes and laughed at the poorer kids with expensive footwear.

 

Funny old world.

 

Only in England you say?

 

Those tiresome status games are a specialty of the Brits - they long ago raised status gradations to an art form. It's an essential component of that moronic class system they insist on clinging to.

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The Bolger view on windshield rake:

 

Any boat steered from inside a deckhouse has a problem with the view from the helm. .... In Quest, the prospective master of the boat specified the far-forward, forward-raked windshield, the door beside the wheel, and the chart table handy to the helm. I don't much care for the forward rake because when you have to shelter a hatch in the deck, such a rake greatly increases the volume and wind resistance of the house. However, I did sympathize with his desire to see where the lobster pot buoys were. 30-Odd Boats, page 123.

 

Quest was a 38', steel utility vessel for a research institution. The drawings show a rather moderate forward rake to the pilothouse windows.

 

There is a sort of "compared to what?" issue here. As Bob described, the forward rake to the windshield reduces the size of the area to be sheltered for a given amount of headroom.

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Coming from a guy in Washington NC, that says a lot! What is the name of your local BBQ hotspot? I went there with Bob P and the guys at PSC for lunch. Fun to watch Bob's introduction to NC BBQ and fixin's. He liked pretty much everything but had a hard time understanding Hush Puppies. He might have got it if we had gone to a fried Catfish joint.

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I am equal opportunity when it comes to BBQ (don't think I've met a style of BBQ I didn't like), though I am partial and biased toward our Eastern NC vinegar-based variety. I'd say the best we have here in Washington is Hog Heaven. You might also have ended up at Boss Hog's. Can't go wrong with either.

 

But 20 minutes away in Greenville is B's Barbecue, which is a roadside dive I'd put up against any Q, anywhere. Skylight Inn in Ayden isn't far away either and has been on its fair share of Best BBQ lists.

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Coming from a guy in Washington NC, that says a lot! What is the name of your local BBQ hotspot? I went there with Bob P and the guys at PSC for lunch. Fun to watch Bob's introduction to NC BBQ and fixin's. He liked pretty much everything but had a hard time understanding Hush Puppies. He might have got it if we had gone to a fried Catfish joint.

 

Wilbur's in Goldsboro used to be the tops. Haven't been there in a few years (wtf!!).

There's a great spot in Grifton just down the road from Washington. I'd be interested to know where 2ndW goes forBBQ.

 

What's hard to figure out about hush puppies??!?

 

FB- Doug

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Coming from a guy in Washington NC, that says a lot! What is the name of your local BBQ hotspot? I went there with Bob P and the guys at PSC for lunch. Fun to watch Bob's introduction to NC BBQ and fixin's. He liked pretty much everything but had a hard time understanding Hush Puppies. He might have got it if we had gone to a fried Catfish joint.

 

Wilbur's in Goldsboro used to be the tops. Haven't been there in a few years (wtf!!).

There's a great spot in Grifton just down the road from Washington. I'd be interested to know where 2ndW goes forBBQ.

 

What's hard to figure out about hush puppies??!?

 

FB- Doug

 

 

I am equal opportunity when it comes to BBQ (don't think I've met a style of BBQ I didn't like), though I am partial and biased toward our Eastern NC vinegar-based variety. I'd say the best we have here in Washington is Hog Heaven. You might also have ended up at Boss Hog's. Can't go wrong with either.

 

But 20 minutes away in Greenville is B's Barbecue, which is a roadside dive I'd put up against any Q, anywhere. Skylight Inn in Ayden isn't far away either and has been on its fair share of Best BBQ lists.

 

Ayden! Not Grifton! Sorry, the Skylight is very good, that's what I was thinking of. I don't really know where stuff is, I just know how to drive there.

 

I will try B's although we don't spend much time up in G-ville. Moore's here in New Bern is pretty darn good, and as a bonus it's almost next door to West Marine.

 

FB- Doug

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Coming from a guy in Washington NC, that says a lot! What is the name of your local BBQ hotspot? I went there with Bob P and the guys at PSC for lunch. Fun to watch Bob's introduction to NC BBQ and fixin's. He liked pretty much everything but had a hard time understanding Hush Puppies. He might have got it if we had gone to a fried Catfish joint.

 

Wilbur's in Goldsboro used to be the tops. Haven't been there in a few years (wtf!!).

There's a great spot in Grifton just down the road from Washington. I'd be interested to know where 2ndW goes forBBQ.

 

What's hard to figure out about hush puppies??!?

 

FB- Doug

They're shoes, right?

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A little different approach to a MBCC or MBPC(modern Bristol pilot cutter)

 

By the way ,i like that forward raking windshield it has his own character

 

Any more info about this beauty? Looks like a great merging of classic and modern lines.

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A little different approach to a MBCC or MBPC(modern Bristol pilot cutter)

 

By the way ,i like that forward raking windshield it has his own character

 

Any more info about this beauty? Looks like a great merging of classic and modern lines.

 

Here is a link to Aka's blog

http://alu56.blogspot.it

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That ferry looks great. I could cartoon that.

BLUEPETER_zps27975f29.jpg

Another winner of a painting.

 

As long as we have posted "cattle boats" as someone referred to them, I might as well post a favorite of mine and one of my kids:

 

Sabinomain.jpg

 

By the way, credit for the general overall design of the AUCOCISCO III goes to John Hunter. She was designed at Seaworthy Systems back in the early 2000s.

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That ferry looks great. I could cartoon that.

BLUEPETER_zps27975f29.jpg

Another winner of a painting.

 

As long as we have posted "cattle boats" as someone referred to them, I might as well post a favorite of mine and one of my kids:

 

Sabinomain.jpg

 

By the way, credit for the general overall design of the AUCOCISCO III goes to John Hunter. She was designed at Seaworthy Systems back in the early 2000s.

Nice ferry. But how would they launch that ship's boat, just out of interest?

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By the way, credit for the general overall design of the AUCOCISCO III goes to John Hunter. She was designed at Seaworthy Systems back in the early 2000s.

Nice ferry. But how would they launch that ship's boat, just out of interest?

 

Good question!

 

Like this, perhaps?

 

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Re Pilothouse.

Typically.The owner came with a photo of a 44 footer from NL with a raking forward windshield. The object was to reduce the size of the boat to 40' for European regulations purpose. In order to visually minimize the size of the pilothouse I placed angled corners and many windows. The result gives a "chiseled" looking boat.

 

post-32003-0-02909000-1419111590_thumb.jpg

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Re Pilothouse.

Typically.The owner came with a photo of a 44 footer from NL with a raking forward windshield. The object was to reduce the size of the boat to 40' for European regulations purpose. In order to visually minimize the size of the pilothouse I placed angled corners and many windows. The result gives a "chiseled" looking boat.

 

I like it

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Re Pilothouse.

Typically.The owner came with a photo of a 44 footer from NL with a raking forward windshield. The object was to reduce the size of the boat to 40' for European regulations purpose. In order to visually minimize the size of the pilothouse I placed angled corners and many windows. The result gives a "chiseled" looking boat.

 

I like it

I do too......

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Re Pilothouse.

Typically.The owner came with a photo of a 44 footer from NL with a raking forward windshield. The object was to reduce the size of the boat to 40' for European regulations purpose. In order to visually minimize the size of the pilothouse I placed angled corners and many windows. The result gives a "chiseled" looking boat.

 

I like it

I do too......

It's still not pretty.

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Sailby:

I think there are feminine "pretty" boats and there are masculine "handsome" boats. I do my best to be gender neutral but I'd consider the PSC a feminine looking boat. I think YMT's boat is a masculine, handsome boat. We tried a similar approach on ND's boat, PSC 63, and we called it the "You talkin' to me" look. ND showed it to his wife one weekend. I called him Monday and asked how she liked it. He said, "She could not have hated it more."

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Sailby:

I think there are feminine "pretty" boats and there are masculine "handsome" boats. I do my best to be gender neutral but I'd consider the PSC a feminine looking boat. I think YMT's boat is a masculine, handsome boat. We tried a similar approach on ND's boat, PSC 63, and we called it the "You talkin' to me" look. ND showed it to his wife one weekend. I called him Monday and asked how she liked it. He said, "She could not have hated it more."

 

When I show boats to my wife she says "do whatever you want, love."

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Sailby:

I think there are feminine "pretty" boats and there are masculine "handsome" boats. I do my best to be gender neutral but I'd consider the PSC a feminine looking boat. I think YMT's boat is a masculine, handsome boat. We tried a similar approach on ND's boat, PSC 63, and we called it the "You talkin' to me" look. ND showed it to his wife one weekend. I called him Monday and asked how she liked it. He said, "She could not have hated it more."

You got to be kidding me, that is a beautiful boat!

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Kim:

ND's wife likes what we have. It's just what she wanted. The model she hated was the plumb bowed version. ND and I liked it but in a project like this it's very important to keep the wife engaged. I just look at it as part of the overall challenge. I like a tough client. The trick it get them to articulate exactly what they want. That is not always easy until they see what they don't want. It's a process of elimination.

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Sailby:

I think there are feminine "pretty" boats and there are masculine "handsome" boats. I do my best to be gender neutral but I'd consider the PSC a feminine looking boat. I think YMT's boat is a masculine, handsome boat. We tried a similar approach on ND's boat, PSC 63, and we called it the "You talkin' to me" look. ND showed it to his wife one weekend. I called him Monday and asked how she liked it. He said, "She could not have hated it more."

Thanks, Bob. I hadn't ever thought of that gender alternative angle. Interesting. I'm a grumpy old fart it's true, but happily still learning.

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Sailby:

I think there are feminine "pretty" boats and there are masculine "handsome" boats. I do my best to be gender neutral but I'd consider the PSC a feminine looking boat. I think YMT's boat is a masculine, handsome boat. We tried a similar approach on ND's boat, PSC 63, and we called it the "You talkin' to me" look. ND showed it to his wife one weekend. I called him Monday and asked how she liked it. He said, "She could not have hated it more."

 

When I show boats to my wife she says "do whatever you want, love."

How is it you guys get women folk like this when it comes to boats? Talk about lucky.

I was talking the other day with my wife about buying a new boat. Her response, "You'll be sailing it by yourself!"

What am I doing wrong? :huh:

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Kim:

ND's wife likes what we have. It's just what she wanted. The model she hated was the plumb bowed version. ND and I liked it but in a project like this it's very important to keep the wife engaged. I just look at it as part of the overall challenge. I like a tough client. The trick it get them to articulate exactly what they want. That is not always easy until they see what they don't want. It's a process of elimination.

Whew! You had me worried there Bob.

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Sailby:

Sounds like you are doing it right to me. One man, one boat. Perfect.

 

"I'm a grumpy old fart it's true,"

I think you are delightful. Birds of a feather and all that.

 

Kim:

I'm glad ND;s wife pushed us towards that look. It's distinctive in this age. Another plumb bowed boat could easily have been boring.

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SWMBO likes FRANKIE, a lot.

 

She wasn't so sure during the project stage. "Why 62 feet?" she would ask. "It is a very small 62 feet honey" I would reply. She wasn't buying that until she went on that first test sail. After that first absolutely no issue gybe she was sold. She does not like drama while sailing (she does not race). She finds FRANKIE to be drama free. Nice job Maestro!

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Can't say I'm a fan of drama under sail either. Maybe there was a time. But that has long passed. Now I like effortless speed and good manners. Thanks Kim.

 

When SWMBO asked, ""Why 62 feet?"

You should have said, "Because 85' won't fit on our dock."

 

Raining hard here but all in all a good day.

IMG_5137_zps87f5237b.jpg

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How is it you guys get women folk like this when it comes to boats? Talk about lucky.

I was talking the other day with my wife about buying a new boat. Her response, "You'll be sailing it by yourself!"

What am I doing wrong? :huh:

You picked the wrong gal.

You may be right, Kimb. But after 42 years, habits can be hard to break.

Besides, I can get my "new boat" kicks vicariously - through your, Bob's and kdh's generosity.

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Can't say I'm a fan of drama under sail either. Maybe there was a time. But that has long passed. Now I like effortless speed and good manners. Thanks Kim.

 

When SWMBO asked, ""Why 62 feet?"

You should have said, "Because 85' won't fit on our dock."

No that show real talent! I'm starting to catch on here.

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How is it you guys get women folk like this when it comes to boats? Talk about lucky.

I was talking the other day with my wife about buying a new boat. Her response, "You'll be sailing it by yourself!"

What am I doing wrong? :huh:

 

You picked the wrong gal.

You may be right, Kimb. But after 42 years, habits can be hard to break.

Besides, I can get my "new boat" kicks vicariously - through your, Bob's and kdh's generosity.

Yeah, I hear you, I have been with SWMBO for 47, just got lucky with her. You need to come visit and go for a sail with Bob and me.

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Can't say I'm a fan of drama under sail either. Maybe there was a time. But that has long passed. Now I like effortless speed and good manners. Thanks Kim.

 

When SWMBO asked, ""Why 62 feet?"

You should have said, "Because 85' won't fit on our dock."

 

Raining hard here but all in all a good day.

IMG_5137_zps87f5237b.jpg

Wonderful.

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Sailby:

I think there are feminine "pretty" boats and there are masculine "handsome" boats. I do my best to be gender neutral but I'd consider the PSC a feminine looking boat. I think YMT's boat is a masculine, handsome boat. We tried a similar approach on ND's boat, PSC 63, and we called it the "You talkin' to me" look. ND showed it to his wife one weekend. I called him Monday and asked how she liked it. He said, "She could not have hated it more."

When I show boats to my wife she says "do whatever you want, love."

These!

 

I'm an incurable doodler and I will 'sail' a design for weeks and eventually get the courage to show her the 'next thing' and go down in flames with a comment much like what ND must have gotten. The thing is, if it's possible, she wants the next boat almost as much and as bad as do I! She knows I must be happy but I know she has to be as well.

 

It's bad enough having to please a single client but two???

 

A yacht designer's first skills are patience coupled with Dream Interpretation.....

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"A yacht designer's first skills are patience coupled with Dream Interpretation..... "

 

Don't think I am particularily patient Veegs but I have the whole "Dream interpretation" thing nailed. I have a client coming back now for his third custom Perry design.

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Sailby:

I think there are feminine "pretty" boats and there are masculine "handsome" boats. I do my best to be gender neutral but I'd consider the PSC a feminine looking boat. I think YMT's boat is a masculine, handsome boat. We tried a similar approach on ND's boat, PSC 63, and we called it the "You talkin' to me" look. ND showed it to his wife one weekend. I called him Monday and asked how she liked it. He said, "She could not have hated it more."

 

When I show boats to my wife she says "do whatever you want, love."

How is it you guys get women folk like this when it comes to boats? Talk about lucky.

I was talking the other day with my wife about buying a new boat. Her response, "You'll be sailing it by yourself!"

What am I doing wrong? :huh:

 

I didn't say I won't be sailing by myself.

 

There are pictures and discussion of the "talkin' to me" version of ND's boat in the "Drool" thread, mostly relating to bow rake.

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"A yacht designer's first skills are patience coupled with Dream Interpretation..... "

 

Don't think I am particularily patient Veegs but I have the whole "Dream interpretation" thing nailed. I have a client coming back now for his third custom Perry design.

Yes, you do Dream Interpretation quite well and that in itself is where the patience is required. Cutting through the rabbit trails of ideas to capture the essence of the Dream....

 

Now the old saying about ' not suffering fools lightly....', that's a different thing--as well it should be.

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We were going out on the 70'er MERIDIAN one day with the owner Chuck. I had taken the boat to Desolation Sound for two weeks just before this with only family as crew. Max and Spike were about 8 and 6 years old and both very comfortable on the boat. As we cleared the breakwater Max looked up and said, "I'll take it Chuck." Chuck looked a bit puzzled but said OK and gave the wheel to Max. Kids!

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We were going out on the 70'er MERIDIAN one day with the owner Chuck. I had taken the boat to Desolation Sound for two weeks just before this with only family as crew. Max and Spike were about 8 and 6 years old and both very comfortable on the boat. As we cleared the breakwater Max looked up and said, "I'll take it Chuck." Chuck looked a bit puzzled but said OK and gave the wheel to Max. Kids!

+1

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Got the walk around a rarity yesterday, the very royal blue 'Goldina II' one of only ten Najad 570s built, and penned by Judel-Vrolijk

which is currently resting at Marina ZarPar at the mo, top marks for venturing in at night... gawd its a shallow entrance!!.... Lovely boat however, and Mario the owner is on a circumnav'er headed for Mexico, the Pacific, then Indian Ocean... and much like the VOR65s back up that way on the long voyage home.

 

In the DR motor boats rule, the baseball stars that own the big ones, tis not a rig they're interested in, mainly how powerful the boom-box sound system is.... so the Najad's class is somewhat lost on the locals...

 

sailingboat-najad-570.jpg

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