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Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Does it come with a codpiece?  And I can easily singlehand or cruise with the wife and no crew. I say that a lot when I see an exotic, beautiful car, or a mansion that is just too f'n big

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At one point Kohinoor supported a 113' fractional spar that was fully powered up in 8 true. Some of the guys sailing her thought it made for interesting times especially when the halyard lock jammed.

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I am listening to Von Karajan right now. Yesterday I received his full set of Sibelius symphonies.

I did not find him"bombastic" at all. I find him subtle. ( As I type this he is pounding away half way through the first movement of the first symphony. Subtle?)

I loved his conducting style.

 

But for a favorite conductor I must go with Vladimir Ashkenazy. Maestro Ashkenazy has the good taste to own one of my designs a nice, Scorpio 72. We have exchanged communications and he has a set if my cartoons framed and mounted on the bhd above his piano. He must love art. He calls me Bob and I call him Maestro. In return I received autographed cd's. Treasures. His ENIGMA VARIATIONS is the best.

 

So,,,,,I got that going for me. Which is good.

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I am listening to Von Karajan right now. Yesterday I received his full set of Sibelius symphonies.

I did not find him"bombastic" at all. I find him subtle. ( As I type this he is pounding away half way through the first movement of the first symphony. Subtle?)

I loved his conducting style.

 

But for a favorite conductor I must go with Vladimir Ashkenazy. Maestro Ashkenazy has the good taste to own one of my designs a nice, Scorpio 72. We have exchanged communications and he has a set if my cartoons framed and mounted on the bhd above his piano. He must love art. He calls me Bob and I call him Maestro. In return I received autographed cd's. Treasures. His ENIGMA VARIATIONS is the best.

 

So,,,,,I got that going for me. Which is good.

So let's see, von Karjan had Kohinoor, Ashkenazy has a Perry designed Scorpio 72, my wife is a conductor and we don't even have a dinghy, where did she go wrong? She is a choir director too, that is her choir singing the Communio from Mozart's Requiem, a beautiful piece, in the video below, she borrowed the orchestra from a friend of ours. My wife isn't even 5' tall so she is hard to see in the video, just look for the waving arms. Bob, I will be happy to have my wife autograph a DVD of the Mozart Requiem concert and send it to you in exchange for an original drawing of yours. Hell I'll even throw in an autographed Carmina Burana DVD too I find my wife's style to be sensitive and delicate,anything but bombastic. I think there should be more female conductors in the musical world.

 

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Ed:

It's a deal!

Today, being Spike's birthday would be perfect for Mozart's Requiem. I'll play it. Many thanks for that reminder. Spike was a real Mozart fan. As he said once as he dozed off on the couch, " Ahhh, Mozart, the sound of the cabin."

I'll need to to PM me your mailing address.

 

Maybe I'll play the Beethoven Requiem too and the Verdi. It is a requiem kind of day here at the shack.

Some Brahm's choral works would be good.

Could be a long music day at the shack.

Probably have to add the Faure mass and cap the day with Schubert's Quintet in C major, a piece that has always reminded me of Spike.

Long music day. Thoughtful, emotional and fun.

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Ed:

It's a deal!

Today, being Spike's birthday would be perfect for Mozart's Requiem. I'll play it. Many thanks for that reminder. Spike was a real Mozart fan. As he said once as he dozed off on the couch, " Ahhh, Mozart, the sound of the cabin."

I'll need to to PM me your mailing address.

 

Maybe I'll play the Beethoven Requiem too and the Verdi. It is a requiem kind of day here at the shack.

Some Brahm's choral works would be good.

Could be a long music day at the shack.

Probably have to add the Faure mass and cap the day with Schubert's Quintet in C major, a piece that has always reminded me of Spike.

Long music day. Thoughtful, emotional and fun.

Some nice music for a sombre anniversary. Music has incredible power to heal.

 

I sent you a PM, thanks.

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I've got the pieces lines up now Ed. Going to do Herreweghe for the Mozart, Faure and the Beethoven. Got the Pm. Will pick out a nice drawing for you so you can show off when Maestro Ashkenazy comes over for dinner.

Got your PM, would love to have maestro Ashkenazy over for dinner, he and my wife could talk music all night while I listened. Next time you talk to him tell him you have friends in Poland that would love to have him over for dinner. If the timing was right, I could have Howard Griffiths come too, he is the conductor for the Brandenburg State Orchestra. He is a pretty well know British conductor, lives in Switzerland and conducts an orchestra in Germany and his lovely wife is Turkish. Next time I see him, I'll ask if he knows maestro Ashkenazy.

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Maestro Ashkenazy lives in Switzerland too so may be he and Howard could car pool over to your place.

Shotgun!

Jeebus, small world, I'll bet Howard and Vladmir know each other. Howard invited us to his home in Switzerland, outside of Zurich, but we haven't made it down there yet. When we do maybe we can hook up with maestro Ashkenazy too. I told my wife to sign the DVDs from the maestra to the maestro. My wife, with her typical modesty said, but kochanie (honey), I'm no maestra. I said well Bob is no maestro either but we call him that on SA. I need your address or should I just send it to Bob Perry, The Shack, Puget Sound, WA. That should get to you, right?

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Ed:

If we used "Maestro" in the world of yacht design surely I would have qualified by now. I like being called "Maestro". Makes me feel important, respected by those who know. I call myself "Maestro".

"Time to take out the garbage,,,Maestro."

 

My address is on my web site, www.perryboat.com

 

Mozart's Confutatis just playing now.

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The bluish light makes it look like a 1980s porno palace. I'm sure it's actually very nice in person.

Those highly varnished panels are certainly pornographic. :) A little aromatherapy oil on the heater and hubba hubba..

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Anyone up North know anything about this Garden designed trawler named Pisces?

Sorry, not sure how to post direct link,,,,,,,

 

 

<www.yachtworld.com/boats/1958/Vic-Franck-Garden-design-North-sea-trawler-2306328/Seattle/WA/United-States#.VMWiSkukJBU>

 

Use the link button on the menu bar, 9 from the left. Hover over the symbols and they tell you what to do, just like the voices in my head.

 

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1958/Vic-Franck-Garden-design-North-sea-trawler-2306328/Seattle/WA/United-States#.VMWiSkukJBU

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Not familiar with that one but Beach Boy just came on the market - one of Gardens best ever IMO. It was designed & built as a log salvage boat, hence the name. Only a partial pic available but trust me, it is a fabulous looking boat. I saw it when it was new and even though it was a work boat in a hard service it looked better than most of the trawler yachts on the market at the time.

 

http://vancouver.craigslist.ca/van/boa/4848870778.html

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Globes : I know PISCES. Built for the "candy king". 67 trawler. Right? Not much of a layout compared to what you would get today in 67', But good looking in that little ship way.

 

TACOS TONIGHT was always to my eye been an awkward looking boat.

 

BEACH BOY is one of my all time favorite Garden designs also and living proof that a lack of "yacht like" details does not mean a boat has to be ugly.

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http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/01/23/taconite-yacht-for-sale-photos_n_6535874.html Taconite, MV built in teak for William Boeing in 1930. 2.5 mil and it's yours!

I'll be honest, I wet my pants a little looking at the pictures. Now I am going to check between the couch cushions and see if I can scrape up a couple of mil.

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I was going through my "download" file, and ran across this very interesting sketch, which must be by Maestro Perry, since the file name is Perry_62. It must appear somewhere in the forum.

 

It reminded me of a design which appeared in the Sketch Book section of a recent Wooden Boat magazine, which featured a proposed 27' daysailer/racer called Aurora. Here is a link:

 

http://www.woodenboat.com/aurora-5

 

Perry_62

Aurora

aurora

 

 

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http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/01/23/taconite-yacht-for-sale-photos_n_6535874.html Taconite, MV built in teak for William Boeing in 1930. 2.5 mil and it's yours!

 

There was a writeup in the local paper about it coming on the market. Cost $400K in 1930. :o How much would that be today? A big house cost $5K and a new car was only $hundreds. Still has the original engines and only burns 12 gallons an hour. Boeing had a crew of 14 on it.

 

There were much better looking old "ships" around here from that era. Gordon Gibson's "Maui Lu" was a much better looking fantail boat but sank up north some years ago. I always though it curious that an aircraft builder would build such a dumpy looking yacht for himself.

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I was going through my "download" file, and ran across this very interesting sketch, which must be by Maestro Perry, since the file name is Perry_62. It must appear somewhere in the forum.

 

It reminded me of a design which appeared in the Sketch Book section of a recent Wooden Boat magazine, which featured a proposed 27' daysailer/racer called Aurora. Here is a link:

 

http://www.woodenboat.com/aurora-5

 

Perry_62

Aurora

 

Bull, that was the sketch Bob did in about 5 minutes when I came to him and said: "Hey Bob, let's do a Puget Sound Daysailor."

 

I have the original and I am thinking of having it framed. That was the beginning of Sliver.

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http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/01/23/taconite-yacht-for-sale-photos_n_6535874.html Taconite, MV built in teak for William Boeing in 1930. 2.5 mil and it's yours!

 

There was a writeup in the local paper about it coming on the market. Cost $400K in 1930. :o How much would that be today? A big house cost $5K and a new car was only $hundreds. Still has the original engines and only burns 12 gallons an hour. Boeing had a crew of 14 on it.

 

There were much better looking old "ships" around here from that era. Gordon Gibson's "Maui Lu" was a much better looking fantail boat but sank up north some years ago. I always though it curious that an aircraft builder would build such a dumpy looking yacht for himself.

$400,000 in 1930 is about $5,670,000 now. Not a bad deal for that kind of workmanship. (I bet it would be $20M+ to build a copy today.)

 

I especially like that there is a "Radio Room" up on the top deck.

 

But "Blue Peter" is much better looking.....

post-8115-0-46318300-1422303063_thumb.jpg

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Geez Kim. Didn't Atalanta have a "radio room". A big nav station really but as the racing nav/tactician you could lock the door and navigate in your slippers!

Yeah, the nav room on Atalanta did have some radios installed, but that Boeing boat's drawing actually labels that top deck room as the "Radio Room". I believe she has a seperate nav room/area down in the pilot house.

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Blue Peter is very much like Gibson's Maui Lu. Those fantail sterns must be just about the best place imaginable for late afternoon drinks.

 

I'm sure that $5MM figure is the official inflation number but I find them very questionable - I'm sure $400K in 1930 was a whole lot richer than $5MM is now.

 

Boeing had the big radio room so he could run his business while cruising all summer. He had his guests flown in on Boeing flying boats. Sort of set the standard for today with the helicopters and satcom systems.

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Slightly off topic, but note that "Blue Peter" refers to the signal flag "P" (papa).

 

In harbor, a ship hoisting "P" means "All persons should report on board as the vessel is about to proceed to sea".

 

From my time in the Navy, hoisting "P" on an operational ship meant "get the heck back, get on board or be left behind". Kind of a double-edged sword depending on where the ship was docked :)

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BLUEPETER_zps27975f29.jpg

 

When my son Max was getting ready to get married I asked him where he wanted the ceremony. He said he'd like to get married on the BLUE PETER. I told him it was a private yacht and not a charter boat. He said he knew that but since I had done design work on the boat maybe I could talk to the owners. KIDS! But I'm a good dad and I told him Id give them a call and see what I could do. I called. They agreed immediately and gave me the available dates. " We always figured we'd have a lot of weddings on the boat." Cost? Nothing. "Just use our caterer." A bit later I got a call from the owner, "Would your son and his wife like to go for a honeymoon cruise? The boat would be going north for the rest of the summer as so long as they could make their own way back to Seattle they could have the boat to themselves for a week." Cost? Nothing. I knew the skipper having worked with him on the redesign job. I tipped him $500 and tipped the cook some amount I've forgotten. And that was that. I can remember standing on the dock, watching BLUE PETER pull away, my son and his wife lounging on the fantail and wondering "Do they know just how lucky they are?" I did not know how to thank the owners. Then it came to me, a cartoon. They really liked it.

Spike%20wedding_zpsethjkxpz.jpg

Spike stlyin' on the BLUE PETER the day his brother Max got married.

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Yep, I am a good dad.

Yes, it is a good cartoon. Thanks Kim. It's a bit different from my other cartoons in that I was trying to stay faithful to the lines and details of the boat. I didn't exaggerate anything. I was working from several photographs given to me by the owner's wife.

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Bull, that was the sketch Bob did in about 5 minutes when I came to him and said: "Hey Bob, let's do a Puget Sound Daysailor."

 

 

I have the original and I am thinking of having it framed. That was the beginning of Sliver.

 

 

I'd frame it and give it a prominent spot on a bulkhead on the boat.

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Gee whizz,,,,I would have tried harder if I knew this was going to be spread around. Reminds me of the time I found the guy going through my dumpster looking for my sketches.

:blink: Dumpster diving for sketches! A higher class of street person I guess. What's this world coming to?

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whatever happened to "Olympic"( from memory 70>80' feet long), saw it at a disposal auction late 86 in seattle and always wondered

I think her name is actually "Olympus", right?

 

If you are talking about Olympus, she is kept in a shed on Lake Union. We see her about from time to time. Apparently, she is chartered quite a bit by her owner.

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I agree Bob. Blue Peter is a better looking boat IMO too, although Olympus is no slouch.

 

Rick Etsell, a friend of mine, is the captain of Olympus and is a naval architect by training. His own boat is a smaller yacht of that era named Argosy.

 

Argosy:

post-25831-0-55823500-1422388625_thumb.jpg

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Very nice but I prefer the unbroken sheer sweep of BLUE PETER.

Who doesn't, Blue Peter is the vessel by which I judge all other classic motor yachts!

 

But I love the fact the owner of Olympus serves as the Stewardess when the boat is chartered.

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I was going through my "download" file, and ran across this very interesting sketch, which must be by Maestro Perry, since the file name is Perry_62. It must appear somewhere in the forum.

 

It reminded me of a design which appeared in the Sketch Book section of a recent Wooden Boat magazine, which featured a proposed 27' daysailer/racer called Aurora. Here is a link:

 

http://www.woodenboat.com/aurora-5

 

Perry_62

Aurora

 

I'll take Hull #..... (the one that comes almost exactly in between 27'loa and 62' loa. I was initially impressed with the aesthetics of Aurora but the more I studied her lines, the more I didn't like her. I can't see any stability in her midsection and the change from V to almost flat underbody seems to be pretty extreme. I'm not confident that just because she flattens out aft, that she'd be a very stiff boat at all. The cassette rudder is attractive in concept on some boats, but this isn't one of them.

 

I'd like to hear others' opinions though...

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RE: Aurora. Why waste so much length in a long aft overhang, on a boat only 27 feet long? I know I know, the star and other great boats had long overhangs but that was then and this is now. I guess I'm not familiar with the reference design--if it is loved so much, why not simply find a way to keep building them but efficiently rather than a new class?

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The high aspect ratio rig and the Swedish square meter appearance with the inboard head stay caught my eye. But the more I looked at it the less I liked it--in fact, the things I didn't like became so painful that I put it to rest early on. I was just curious whether the things I disliked were just me or whether I was alone in my opinions.

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What about Talitha G?

 

images.jpg

 

Stacks are too fat, masts on a motorboat fail, cartoonish freighter-prodster on the bow, which is too pointy.

 

Ooops, thought I was in a mocking thread. Nevermind.

 

Talitha G was originally Reveler. The Cox & Stevens design had one, properly proportioned funnel. In 1993 she was "modernized" under the direction of Jon Bannenberg who created two oversize funnels to conceal equipment including the giant communications domes of the day. I thought it was a pretty good tradeoff......

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What about Talitha G?

 

images.jpg

Stacks are too fat, masts on a motorboat fail, cartoonish freighter-prodster on the bow, which is too pointy.

 

Ooops, thought I was in a mocking thread. Nevermind.

Tom! The masts are to hold up your 80 meter dipole! Or better yet your broad band doublet fed with 600 ohm twin feeders.
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Talitha G was originally Reveler. The Cox & Stevens design had one, properly proportioned funnel. In 1993 she was "modernized" under the direction of Jon Bannenberg who created two oversize funnels to conceal equipment including the giant communications domes of the day. I thought it was a pretty good tradeoff......

 

When I saw the photo of Talitha G I thought it had a certain resemblance to the Danish royal yacht, aside from the double stacks. It was built about the same time, 1931, and it does have the communications domes they hid on Talitha G. Click through for the full size.

 

gallery_13136_823_265780.jpg

 

gallery_13136_823_53684.jpg

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What about Talitha G?

 

images.jpg

 

Stacks are too fat, masts on a motorboat fail, cartoonish freighter-prodster on the bow, which is too pointy.

 

Ooops, thought I was in a mocking thread. Nevermind.

Theodore Tugboat's yottie friend?

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What about Talitha G?

 

images.jpg

Stacks are too fat, masts on a motorboat fail, cartoonish freighter-prodster on the bow, which is too pointy.

 

Ooops, thought I was in a mocking thread. Nevermind.

Tom! The masts are to hold up your 80 meter dipole! Or better yet your broad band doublet fed with 600 ohm twin feeders.

 

Huh?

 

I'm not sure I want to show my dipole and doublets to the world! And it's really not that big. And I don't really like to shock them.

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I think that Danish Royal yacht is beautiful. I love the overall proportions.

Those twin huge stacks on TALITHA for my eye are far too prominent. Maybe they do a job but I think they do the job poorly.

 

I may apply for the job as King of Denmark. I read the book.

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Pffft. Tasmania isn't as uncivilised and backward as you might believe. We have elek-trickery, tar-McAdam sealed roads, most people have a water-closet in the hose rather than a long-drop in the back garden. Some of us can even read, write and 'rithmetic.

 

What a strange life path - born on Tasmania and ending up as Queen of Denmark.

 

When that happens will the Ozzies hold off on the hillbilly jokes?

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That's all well and good, but what about the sheep?

Pffft. Tasmania isn't as uncivilised and backward as you might believe. We have elek-trickery, tar-McAdam sealed roads, most people have a water-closet in the hose rather than a long-drop in the back garden. Some of us can even read, write and 'rithmetic.

 

 

What a strange life path - born on Tasmania and ending up as Queen of Denmark.

 

When that happens will the Ozzies hold off on the hillbilly jokes?

 

 

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That's all well and good, but what about the sheep?

Pffft. Tasmania isn't as uncivilised and backward as you might believe. We have elek-trickery, tar-McAdam sealed roads, most people have a water-closet in the hose rather than a long-drop in the back garden. Some of us can even read, write and 'rithmetic.

 

What a strange life path - born on Tasmania and ending up as Queen of Denmark.

 

When that happens will the Ozzies hold off on the hillbilly jokes?

 

 

They still have to use the long drop, unless they are housepets, in which case they can use the toilet.

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That's all well and good, but what about the sheep?

Pffft. Tasmania isn't as uncivilised and backward as you might believe. We have elek-trickery, tar-McAdam sealed roads, most people have a water-closet in the hose rather than a long-drop in the back garden. Some of us can even read, write and 'rithmetic.

 

 

What a strange life path - born on Tasmania and ending up as Queen of Denmark.

 

When that happens will the Ozzies hold off on the hillbilly jokes?

 

 

 

 

They still have to use the long drop, unless they are housepets, in which case they can use the toilet.

 

 

Is that why the mainland Aussies refer to Tasmania as a place where "men are men, and sheep are worried"?
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Considering there are around 2 million sheep in Tasmania and around 73 million sheep in the rest of Australia, I don't think you should be pointing the finger at Tassie, cocko!

 

 

 

That's all well and good, but what about the sheep?

Pffft. Tasmania isn't as uncivilised and backward as you might believe. We have elek-trickery, tar-McAdam sealed roads, most people have a water-closet in the hose rather than a long-drop in the back garden. Some of us can even read, write and 'rithmetic.

What a strange life path - born on Tasmania and ending up as Queen of Denmark.

When that happens will the Ozzies hold off on the hillbilly jokes?

 

 


They still have to use the long drop, unless they are housepets, in which case they can use the toilet.

 

Is that why the mainland Aussies refer to Tasmania as a place where "men are men, and sheep are worried"?
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