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In 1963 I returned from Europe on the SS United States in October. The captain of the ship must have wanted to get home in a hurry, we made the crossing from Le Havre, France to NYC in 4 1/2 days. The North Atlantic was a tad rough, the waves were big enough to toss an almost 1,000' ship up and down like an elevator on crack. One minute you would be weightless, the next, your stomach was trying to push through your diaphragm. The only time in my life I got seasick, the first day was hell and then I got used to the motion. Back then the ocean liners were built to go anywhere, anytime.

 

When I look at these wedding cake mega yachts it reminds of the modern "cruise ships". I don't think any of them would have survived that crossing we made in '63. I like the looks of a purposeful boat. It is a shame that the SS United States is rusting away at a pier in Philadelphia, I hope they can eventually restore her. There is a great video of her past and present on this site: http://www.ssusc.org/category/news/

 

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I've been working on the S Boat painting from the photo I posted a few days ago, and I thought y'all might like to see how it's coming along. It's 12" X 24". I liked the composition of the photo,

Adagio just started the Port Huron to Mackinaw race In her 52'nd year of racing. First large wood-epoxy boat boat built without fasteners. She rates faster than the Santa Cruz 70's.

Does it come with a codpiece?  And I can easily singlehand or cruise with the wife and no crew. I say that a lot when I see an exotic, beautiful car, or a mansion that is just too f'n big

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OMG nooo.... ghastly stinkboat superyachts.... here on dinghy/retro sail boat lovin' anarchy.... surely not?!? I've never seen one I've ever liked. I found in interesting reading that the Irishman Eddie Jordan (him of F1 fame)... has the super posser mega Sunseeker to be dockside Monaco.... though bought the Oyster to go real time circumnav sailing on....still with crew of course. If its gotta say FOTROYPs... then only Perini Navi will do...

 

Perini-Navi-52-metre-superyacht-CLAN-VII

 

Though while docked in Poros/Πόρος, Greece... I'll never forget Aegyd arriving double handed at sunset on 'Sarah Key'.... parking neatly backward amongst the white Corolla/Camry MV tottie.... a crowd gathered quickly.

 

For sheer class...sail wins hands down... always.

 

P4279926.JPG

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I crossed the Atlantic on France back in '72 - one of the last regularly scheduled crossings from New York to Southampton and on to Le Havre...

 

Unfortunately i was just 6 years old at the time - too young to really appreciate the chance I had, but I still have some memories of the ship and the voyage...

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That is beautiful. It actually has spring to the sheer. It actually has a sheer. I bet it even has walk around side decks above the sheer.

 

And I see Ben Lexcen had a hand in the design of the funnels....

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That is beautiful. It actually has spring to the sheer. It actually has a sheer. I bet it even has walk around side decks above the sheer.

 

And I see Ben Lexcen had a hand in the design of the funnels....

 

:)

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Re stink boats:

*I've never seen one I've ever liked*

Actually that’s not quite true, (well we all do white lies occasionally)…John Shuttleworth’s ‘Adastra’ is a beauty… and very fuel efficient too…

Superyacht-Adastra-profile-a-42.5m-Power

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-GCDuwu_Z8

http://www.shuttleworthdesign.com/adastra.php

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I wonder how you tie it to the dock?

 

Re stink boats:

*I've never seen one I've ever liked*

Actually thats not quite true, (well we all do white lies occasionally)John Shuttleworths Adastra is a beauty and very fuel efficient too

Superyacht-Adastra-profile-a-42.5m-Power

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-GCDuwu_Z8

http://www.shuttleworthdesign.com/adastra.php

 

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This was having a bum scrub down at the marina (Shotley, Essex) on Saturday.

 

Such beautiful lines, you couldn't help but stop and admire it.

 

Newish 8m by the looks of it, missing its appendages?

 

 

That's my guess, it looks exactly like a 1960s~1970s era 12 Meter, only without the rig or foils. And it looks too big to be a 6M.

 

Beautiful boat, hope it goes back together well

 

FB- Doug

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When I had my cronie dinner the other night we were discussing the meter boats and saying despite the controls imposed or because of those controls those hulls are among the most beautiful ever designed. That big, deep midsection with all that deadrise was a pure result of the rule and the midships chain and skin girth measurements. Simply speaking you paid a penalty if your skin girth and your chain girth were not the same.

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I know a lot of people that pay a penalty because their skin girth and chain girth are not the same, but I can think of women that are beautiful as a result of same. Go figure.

Life is full of mysteries like that. It's a conundrum.

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You know you are bordering on becoming one of the world's most boring people when a discussion of skin and chain girths is exciting.

I resemble that remark.

 

Hey Soaker!

Next week on the PBS show Globe Trekker they are doing Poland. I'm going to watch it because you live there.

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No.

http://www.5.5class.org/technique/55_rating_rules_07.pdf

 

2. MEASUREMENT FORMULA AND LIMITS

2.1. 0.9*((L*S^(1/2)/12/D^(1/3))+((L+S^(1/2))/4)) shall not exceed 5.500 metres

Where: L = Length for rating (rule 3) S = Measured sail area (rule 16) D = Displacement in cubic metres. This shall be taken as the weight (kg) when the yacht is first measured or when it is re-weighed for subsequent revalidation's, divided by 1025.

2.2. The following limits shall apply: Minimum beam 1.900m (rule 5) Maximum draft 1.350m (rule 14) Maximum D 2.000m3 Minimum D 1.700m3 Minimum average F 0.628m (rule 4) Maximum S 29.000m² (rule 16) Minimum S 26.500m²

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You know you are bordering on becoming one of the world's most boring people when a discussion of skin and chain girths is exciting.

I resemble that remark.

 

Hey Soaker!

Next week on the PBS show Globe Trekker they are doing Poland. I'm going to watch it because you live there.

Good to see you have weathered your technology hickup Bob and are back entertaining us w/ pearls of wisdom!!

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You know you are bordering on becoming one of the world's most boring people when a discussion of skin and chain girths is exciting.

I resemble that remark.

 

Hey Soaker!

Next week on the PBS show Globe Trekker they are doing Poland. I'm going to watch it because you live there.

That's cool. Make sure you have some ice cold vodka on hand or at least some Polish beer. I'll have to see if I can watch it on the internet. Nas drowia!

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Ed:

I'll try and find out exactly when it's going to be on. I will get some Polish vodka. Care to recommend one?

In my opinion pretty much all but the cheapest vodkas are alike. The biggest difference is the more expensive ones might be filtered a little more. Belvedere, Chopin, Sobieski are all good better brands. If you want something different there is Dąbrowa which is aged in oak with a nice hint of oak in it. Dąb means oak in Polish. Or there is Żubrówka, a Żubr is a type of European bison. They eat a particular grass which has a spicy, touch of cinnamon flavor. They use this in the vodka and there is one stem of the bison grass in the bottle. You can mix it with apple juice and make a drink called "Czarlotka" which means "apple pie' which is exactly what you taste when you drink it. Both of those brands should be available in the US. Whatever you get, drink it cold, I keep mine in the freezer, melting ice dilutes it too much. Warm vodka sucks.

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This is the next iteration

 

attachicon.gifphoto.JPG

 

Looks like an Imperial Stormtrooper.

 

I can see the aesthetic/seakeeping progression for the white one, but I like the yellow one more. For cruising an archapeligo, inland passages, lakes, rivers etc.? :wub:

 

Carry a blow up convertible Windsurfer/ SUP or maybe a blow up sailing proa? Nuzzle up to a beach, gunk holing etc.......

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I'll see what I can find Ed. Chopin vodka sounds good.

Chopin is my sentimental favorite, when I first met my wife, she gave me a bottle of Chopin vodka with two shot glasses. The vodka is long gone but I still love the glasses with a profile of Chopin on them. I love Chopin. The composer that is, the vodka is good too. My wife plays Chopin for me when I am good. Chopin vodka costs about $20.00 for a .7 liter bottle here in a nice box. That is high end vodka in Poland where the average stuff is about $7.00-10.00 for .7 liter. I have no idea what it will cost in the US. Of course in Poland tradition demands once you open a bottle, you don't put the cap back. Vodka usually comes in .5 and .7 liter bottles, occasionally 1 liter. I have 2 brothers in law that drink that shit like water, I can handle a half liter ok, after that things get dicey.

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good vodka:

 

 

nl_norway_050413edit.jpg

Any ice cold vodka is good vodka. Vodka is just grain alcohol watered down to usually 80 proof (40% alcohol) and to my palate, just alcohol tastes like shit. Get it cold enough it just slides down the throat and pretty soon you con't care about anything.

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Vikingsfjord is pure potato vodka. That's hard to find today.

Chopin is a potato vodka as well. As is Luksusowa, a very good and more affordable potato vodka than Chopin, but I bet you can't tell the difference. I happen to have a .5l bottle of Żubrówka in my Scotch cabinet that I picked up in Olecko about 10 years ago when I visited the Delphia factory. Maybe I'll open it and have a dram one day.

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Vikingsfjord is pure potato vodka. That's hard to find today.

 

I thought that was the definition of Vodka. What else can it be made from and still be Vodka?

 

Or have the advertising scumbags made it so any sort of grain alcohol is "Vodka"?

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Vikingsfjord is pure potato vodka. That's hard to find today.

 

I thought that was the definition of Vodka. What else can it be made from and still be Vodka?

 

Or have the advertising scumbags made it so any sort of grain alcohol is "Vodka"?

 

 

According to Wikipedia, vodka has always been made from a variety of grains or potatoes. We can still regard the advertising world as scumbags, however.

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[attachment=219094:IMG_3013.jpg

Peniel at Friday Harbor yesterday, looking good.

That's a Bill Garden sloop isn't it, fred? As you say, she's still looking good.

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Yes, definitely Bill Garden, she was owner for a number of years by a friend of Bob Perry and Mine, Peter Dow. He used to create gourmet meals on board, previously owned Cafe Juanita in Seattle area and then went on to be a wine importer, Cavatapi wines. Brings back fond memories to see her being well cared for and could definitely fit in the hard dodger thread too although I would tend to refer to her cabin as a Dog House.

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[attachment=219094:IMG_3013.jpg

Peniel at Friday Harbor yesterday, looking good.

What a nice looking boat. Self confident, still a bit perky but grown-up now, without the slightly fake "look at me I'm a ship" look of some of his boats.

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Similar to the above?

 

Last year I met Hoek design 36' Tintel in Norway:

From designers comment:

"Tin­tel was com­mis­sioned by the owner of the 70-foot clas­sic ketch Kim. The main rea­son for this new pro­ject was his de­sire for a smaller yacht that could be eas­ily han­dled by one or two crew. In re­sponse, we de­vel­oped an ex­cit­ing and in­no­v­a­tive pilot cut­ter, with a plumb bow and tiller steer­ing.

Her mod­ern un­der­wa­ter con­fig­u­ra­tion in­cludes a deep fin keel and spade rud­der, while a very high sail area to dis­place­ment ratio of­fers an im­pres­sive per­for­mance in all con­di­tions. Launched in 2000, Tin­tel ful­filled her brief ad­mirably while cruis­ing in north­ern Eu­ro­pean wa­ters, where her beau­ti­ful looks drew many plau­dits."

 

SPECIFICATIONS

 

LOA 11.0 m

LWL 10.5 m

Beam 3.4 m

Draft 2.1 m

Sail Area 114 m2

Yard Bloemsma & van Breemen

Year 2001

25.jpg

 

303.jpg

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Similar to the above?

 

Last year I met Hoek design 36' Tintel in Norway:

From designers comment:

"Tin­tel was com­mis­sioned by the owner of the 70-foot clas­sic ketch Kim. The main rea­son for this new pro­ject was his de­sire for a smaller yacht that could be eas­ily han­dled by one or two crew. In re­sponse, we de­vel­oped an ex­cit­ing and in­no­v­a­tive pilot cut­ter, with a plumb bow and tiller steer­ing.

Her mod­ern un­der­wa­ter con­fig­u­ra­tion in­cludes a deep fin keel and spade rud­der, while a very high sail area to dis­place­ment ratio of­fers an im­pres­sive per­for­mance in all con­di­tions. Launched in 2000, Tin­tel ful­filled her brief ad­mirably while cruis­ing in north­ern Eu­ro­pean wa­ters, where her beau­ti­ful looks drew many plau­dits."

 

SPECIFICATIONS

 

LOA 11.0 m

LWL 10.5 m

Beam 3.4 m

Draft 2.1 m

Sail Area 114 m2

Yard Bloemsma & van Breemen

Year 2001

25.jpg

 

303.jpg

Lovely looking cutter. Maybe a little more sheer spring and a longer sprit in line with her sheer, would please me more - but she is pretty for sure.

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I don't like that Hoek design. Everything about it looks wrong to my eye. It's a B- at best. I'm really thinking C+.

 

Yea, I have to agree. Something very wonky and stilted about that design.

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I'm sort of picky. It's a fabulous boat. no question. But I'd like to tweak every line about 2.783" That is all it would take.

 

Ok, 2.82115". The extra room will help. I don't need all of it.

That cabin trunk may be "retro" but it's retro awful.

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i am too and i couldn't figure out what everybody was on about

 

Just remember we're right, and they're the ones that see the world oddly . . .

 

 

There was a really cool show on NPR last weekend - I think it was RadioLab - that addressed visual acuity (and especially color detection) and what the world looks like to various species, which they illustrated with a chorus that expanded its range as color reception (# of cone types) grew. More infrared, more ultraviolet, more graduations of blue.

 

Turns out the mantis shrimp is the champion, with 14 types of cones as opposed to our measly 3 (and for the R/G colorblind, 2). The vocal illustrations were fascinating. I knew those stupid Costco runs were good for something.

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Back when I lived in Miami I used to see the France (though she was called the Norway at the time) going in and out of Government cut. That was a pretty ship

 

attachicon.gifSS_Norway.jpg

 

The France surrendered and became the Norway. ;-)

 

Also, my Dad did 3 1/2 transatlantics between '53 and '56 on the SS United States, coming from Germany to the States to woo my Mom, who had to accompany her parents to the US after they escaped East Berlin. The last 1/2 was to stay in the US. One of the transat runs was a record-setter according to him; he loved that boat.

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Vikingsfjord is pure potato vodka. That's hard to find today.

Chopin is a potato vodka as well. As is Luksusowa, a very good and more affordable potato vodka than Chopin, but I bet you can't tell the difference. I happen to have a .5l bottle of Żubrówka in my Scotch cabinet that I picked up in Olecko about 10 years ago when I visited the Delphia factory. Maybe I'll open it and have a dram one day.

 

 

We have a domestic single-point-of-origin potato vodka here in Colorado, Woody Creek. From Hunter S. Thompson's old stomping ground - they grow the potatos, harvest them, distill, filter and age it all on site.

 

Our town hosted a Colorado distiller's show for which my wife's shop was a food pairing; to me the Woody Creek was the best Wodka by far. And we don't really like them folks up Aspen way ;-)

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I'm sort of picky. It's a fabulous boat. no question. But I'd like to tweak every line about 2.783" That is all it would take.

 

Ok, 2.82115". The extra room will help. I don't need all of it.

That cabin trunk may be "retro" but it's retro awful.

 

Ok Bob, should I ever get to win the Euromillions lottery, I'll let you design your updated version of the classic pilot cutter

 

I love the basic concept but I agree with you, looking at it more closely, there are some lines that are just a bit 'off'...

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Similar to the above?

 

Last year I met Hoek design 36' Tintel in Norway:

From designers comment:

"Tin­tel was com­mis­sioned by the owner of the 70-foot clas­sic ketch Kim. The main rea­son for this new pro­ject was his de­sire for a smaller yacht that could be eas­ily han­dled by one or two crew. In re­sponse, we de­vel­oped an ex­cit­ing and in­no­v­a­tive pilot cut­ter, with a plumb bow and tiller steer­ing.

Her mod­ern un­der­wa­ter con­fig­u­ra­tion in­cludes a deep fin keel and spade rud­der, while a very high sail area to dis­place­ment ratio of­fers an im­pres­sive per­for­mance in all con­di­tions. Launched in 2000, Tin­tel ful­filled her brief ad­mirably while cruis­ing in north­ern Eu­ro­pean wa­ters, where her beau­ti­ful looks drew many plau­dits."

 

SPECIFICATIONS

 

LOA 11.0 m

LWL 10.5 m

Beam 3.4 m

Draft 2.1 m

Sail Area 114 m2

Yard Bloemsma & van Breemen

Year 2001

25.jpg

 

303.jpg

 

Bob, apart from the doghouse (which I grant is a bit crook - it looks like it's in its retracted position), what else is wrong? To my eye it looks a rather manly and matter of fact boat (if a bit chunky). And the "Pilot Cutter" thing has been somewhat overworked of late, it's true.

 

And I wonder what that line hanging from the bobstay fitting is - in the first one it's tied off to the side of the boat, and on the other it seems to be under tension pointing down. And I don't think the rope rode will last long up against the bobstay like that in the first photo.

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Ed:

It's a nice boat. It's beautifully built.

 

I don't like:

the bowsprit treatment

the quasi rub strip line

the puny, thin bootstripe

the ultra boxy cabin trunk

the anemic, weak looking outboard rudder profile

The lack of character in the cockpit coamings.

 

 

It's all subjective. I understand I am being very picky. It's a knee jerk reaction for me to look at a boat and wonder what I would do differently. That's one way I try to continue learning my craft. I suspect Mr. Hoek would have the same reaction if he saw my CF cutter. He'd change everything to suit his eye.

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Similar to the above?

 

Last year I met Hoek design 36' Tintel in Norway:

From designers comment:

"Tin­tel was com­mis­sioned by the owner of the 70-foot clas­sic ketch Kim. The main rea­son for this new pro­ject was his de­sire for a smaller yacht that could be eas­ily han­dled by one or two crew. In re­sponse, we de­vel­oped an ex­cit­ing and in­no­v­a­tive pilot cut­ter, with a plumb bow and tiller steer­ing.

Her mod­ern un­der­wa­ter con­fig­u­ra­tion in­cludes a deep fin keel and spade rud­der, while a very high sail area to dis­place­ment ratio of­fers an im­pres­sive per­for­mance in all con­di­tions. Launched in 2000, Tin­tel ful­filled her brief ad­mirably while cruis­ing in north­ern Eu­ro­pean wa­ters, where her beau­ti­ful looks drew many plau­dits."

 

SPECIFICATIONS

 

LOA 11.0 m

LWL 10.5 m

Beam 3.4 m

Draft 2.1 m

Sail Area 114 m2

Yard Bloemsma & van Breemen

Year 2001

25.jpg

 

303.jpg

 

 

 

And I wonder what that line hanging from the bobstay fitting is - in the first one it's tied off to the side of the boat, and on the other it seems to be under tension pointing down. And I don't think the rope rode will last long up against the bobstay like that in the first photo.

 

 

 

 

 

Ed, I believe the line you're curious about is a strop hooked to the anchor chain. It takes the load of the chain and improves the effective scope, and prevents chafe on the bobstay.

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Similar to the above?

 

Last year I met Hoek design 36' Tintel in Norway:

From designers comment:

"Tin­tel was com­mis­sioned by the owner of the 70-foot clas­sic ketch Kim. The main rea­son for this new pro­ject was his de­sire for a smaller yacht that could be eas­ily han­dled by one or two crew. In re­sponse, we de­vel­oped an ex­cit­ing and in­no­v­a­tive pilot cut­ter, with a plumb bow and tiller steer­ing.

Her mod­ern un­der­wa­ter con­fig­u­ra­tion in­cludes a deep fin keel and spade rud­der, while a very high sail area to dis­place­ment ratio of­fers an im­pres­sive per­for­mance in all con­di­tions. Launched in 2000, Tin­tel ful­filled her brief ad­mirably while cruis­ing in north­ern Eu­ro­pean wa­ters, where her beau­ti­ful looks drew many plau­dits."

 

SPECIFICATIONS

 

LOA 11.0 m

LWL 10.5 m

Beam 3.4 m

Draft 2.1 m

Sail Area 114 m2

Yard Bloemsma & van Breemen

Year 2001

25.jpg

 

303.jpg

 

 

 

And I wonder what that line hanging from the bobstay fitting is - in the first one it's tied off to the side of the boat, and on the other it seems to be under tension pointing down. And I don't think the rope rode will last long up against the bobstay like that in the first photo.

 

 

 

 

 

Ed, I believe the line you're curious about is a strop hooked to the anchor chain. It takes the load of the chain and improves the effective scope, and prevents chafe on the bobstay.

 

 

I don't see any chain coming down from the boat anywhere...looks like rope rode spliced to chain to me. First pic is with breeze, second is calm with rope hanging with chain on the bottom.

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Similar to the above?

 

Last year I met Hoek design 36' Tintel in Norway:

From designers comment:

"Tin­tel was com­mis­sioned by the owner of the 70-foot clas­sic ketch Kim. The main rea­son for this new pro­ject was his de­sire for a smaller yacht that could be eas­ily han­dled by one or two crew. In re­sponse, we de­vel­oped an ex­cit­ing and in­no­v­a­tive pilot cut­ter, with a plumb bow and tiller steer­ing.

Her mod­ern un­der­wa­ter con­fig­u­ra­tion in­cludes a deep fin keel and spade rud­der, while a very high sail area to dis­place­ment ratio of­fers an im­pres­sive per­for­mance in all con­di­tions. Launched in 2000, Tin­tel ful­filled her brief ad­mirably while cruis­ing in north­ern Eu­ro­pean wa­ters, where her beau­ti­ful looks drew many plau­dits."

 

SPECIFICATIONS

 

LOA 11.0 m

LWL 10.5 m

Beam 3.4 m

Draft 2.1 m

Sail Area 114 m2

Yard Bloemsma & van Breemen

Year 2001

25.jpg

 

303.jpg

 

 

 

And I wonder what that line hanging from the bobstay fitting is - in the first one it's tied off to the side of the boat, and on the other it seems to be under tension pointing down. And I don't think the rope rode will last long up against the bobstay like that in the first photo.

 

 

 

 

 

Ed, I believe the line you're curious about is a strop hooked to the anchor chain. It takes the load of the chain and improves the effective scope, and prevents chafe on the bobstay.

 

 

I don't see any chain coming down from the boat anywhere...looks like rope rode spliced to chain to me. First pic is with breeze, second is calm with rope hanging with chain on the bottom.

 

On closer observation I see there's no hook on the line I guessed to be a strop and as in the first photo the anchor rode appears to be rope, for my guess to be correct it would be necessary to tie the strop onto the rode. This could be done with a timber hitch or two rolling hitches, but might slip when the rode became slack. Gate probably has a knot more suited to the job. On Van Diemen there is a hook on the nylon strop which grabs the chain and works very well.

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Another aesthetically challenged production train wreck, and it's pink!

 

attachicon.gif03.jpg

 

And I really want one. In light grey or powder blue....

 

We could paint your boat in Ugly camouflage. I'd kick in a can of Rustoleum.

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Ed:

It's a nice boat. It's beautifully built.

 

I don't like:

the bowsprit treatment

the quasi rub strip line

the puny, thin bootstripe

the ultra boxy cabin trunk

the anemic, weak looking outboard rudder profile

The lack of character in the cockpit coamings.

 

 

It's all subjective. I understand I am being very picky. It's a knee jerk reaction for me to look at a boat and wonder what I would do differently. That's one way I try to continue learning my craft. I suspect Mr. Hoek would have the same reaction if he saw my CF cutter. He'd change everything to suit his eye.

 

 

Bob

 

Thanks for that! Lovely to hear you thinking out loud. Especially as to the lack of moral fibre in the coamings.

 

God is in the details, eh?

 

I'm pleased you weren't dissing the sheer line which I thought pleasant.

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Ed:

I like the boat but the designer in me says "I can do that better". I looked hard at the sheer and I agree with you, it's nice. But see that rub strip or bump or whatever that lump is running almost parallel to the sheer? I don't care for the interplay of that line with the sheer. It;s closer to the sheer forward and farther away from the sheer at the transom. I would drop it a bit forward. Just silly, subjective small changes.

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Similar to the above?

 

Last year I met Hoek design 36' Tintel in Norway:

From designers comment:

"Tin­tel was com­mis­sioned by the owner of the 70-foot clas­sic ketch Kim. The main rea­son for this new pro­ject was his de­sire for a smaller yacht that could be eas­ily han­dled by one or two crew. In re­sponse, we de­vel­oped an ex­cit­ing and in­no­v­a­tive pilot cut­ter, with a plumb bow and tiller steer­ing.

Her mod­ern un­der­wa­ter con­fig­u­ra­tion in­cludes a deep fin keel and spade rud­der, while a very high sail area to dis­place­ment ratio of­fers an im­pres­sive per­for­mance in all con­di­tions. Launched in 2000, Tin­tel ful­filled her brief ad­mirably while cruis­ing in north­ern Eu­ro­pean wa­ters, where her beau­ti­ful looks drew many plau­dits."

 

SPECIFICATIONS

 

LOA 11.0 m

LWL 10.5 m

Beam 3.4 m

Draft 2.1 m

Sail Area 114 m2

Yard Bloemsma & van Breemen

Year 2001

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And I wonder what that line hanging from the bobstay fitting is - in the first one it's tied off to the side of the boat, and on the other it seems to be under tension pointing down. And I don't think the rope rode will last long up against the bobstay like that in the first photo.

 

 

 

 

 

Ed, I believe the line you're curious about is a strop hooked to the anchor chain. It takes the load of the chain and improves the effective scope, and prevents chafe on the bobstay.

 

 

I don't see any chain coming down from the boat anywhere...looks like rope rode spliced to chain to me. First pic is with breeze, second is calm with rope hanging with chain on the bottom.

 

On closer observation I see there's no hook on the line I guessed to be a strop and as in the first photo the anchor rode appears to be rope, for my guess to be correct it would be necessary to tie the strop onto the rode. This could be done with a timber hitch or two rolling hitches, but might slip when the rode became slack. Gate probably has a knot more suited to the job. On Van Diemen there is a hook on the nylon strop which grabs the chain and works very well.

 

I like this boat a lot but a couple questions. Is it wooden? The stem looks like wood but it was built in 2001 so maybe it was made to look like wood. What is the correct name for the structure projecting off the stern that the back stay attaches to?

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Ed:

I like the boat but the designer in me says "I can do that better". I looked hard at the sheer and I agree with you, it's nice. But see that rub strip or bump or whatever that lump is running almost parallel to the sheer? I don't care for the interplay of that line with the sheer. It;s closer to the sheer forward and farther away from the sheer at the transom. I would drop it a bit forward. Just silly, subjective small changes.

Damn, but you have a good eye. I thought the rub rail thing was just a paralell to the sheer to reduce the visual impact of the higher freeboard.

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Bird:

How you treat that "rub rail" line is a personal thing. I worked with a designer when I was young who always placed the rub rail half way between the sheer and the DWL. I thought it looked like shit there. I do it by eye with an eye to where max beam is and where I think it become less than effective for actual rubbing. I like to flatten the curvature of the rub rail. If it's really close to the sheer, say 6" or maybe 10" you can just parallel the sheer. That works in that case. But if it's further down the hull I use a flatter curve, closer to the sheer amidships and then dropping very slightly in the ends. I do the same thing with a cove stripe. I try to avoid the "smile" shape you get if you maintain a constant "on the skin" distance. It has to be a vertical distance regardless of the skin girth. For my eye anyway. If you look at CATARI, ND's boat, you can see I combined cove stripe and rub rail. I like the result. But I broke my own rule here and gave the curve a bit of a kick aft.

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Tintel is aluminum and the rub strip is probably welded on whilst the hull is upside down. It may be the strip is actually parallel to the sheer and is 'distorted' in the photo shown. When I look at the profile of Catari my cranky eyes interpret the cove stripe/rub rail has a greater curve than the sheer. I personally think the Hoek design is very attractive and needs no 'tweeks' To me that would be an insult to the designer.

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